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Full text of "Public accounts of Canada, 1985, v.1"

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Government 
of Canada 



Gouvernement 
du Canada 



Receiver General for Canada 

Hon. Stewart D. Mclnnes 






jblic accounis of conodo 




r 1 rtl r 



Tfy 



Volume I 

Summary Report and 
Financial Statements 



Canada 



\ 




1^ 



fiOVERNMEHT DOCUMENTS 

US 



Government 
of Canada 



Gouvernement 
du Canada 




Receiver General for Canada 

Hon. Stewart D. Mclnnes 



>ublic occounls of conodo 




METROPOLITAN 

TORONTO 

LIBRAf?y 



Business 



Volume I 

Summary Report and 
Financial Statements 



Canada 



3Bc 



© Minister of Supply and Services Canada 1985 

Available in Canada through 

Authorized Bookstore Agents 
and other bookstores 

or by mail from 

Canadian Government Publishing Centre 
Supply and Services Canada 
Ottawa, Canada K1A0S9 

Catalogue No. P 51-1/1985-lE Canada: $9.50 

ISBN 0-660-1 1891-2 Other Countries: $1 1.40 

Price subject to change without notice 



To Her Excellency 

The Right Honourable Jeanne Sauve, 
P.C, C.C, C.M.M., CD., 
Governor General and 
Commander-in-Chief of Canada. 

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your 
Excellency the Public Accounts of Canada for the year 
ended March 31, 1985. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Robert de Cotret, 
President of the Treasury Board. 

OTTAWA, DECEMBER 5, 1985 



To The Honourable Robert de Cotret, 
President of the Treasury Board. 

In accordance with the provisions of Section 55(1) of 
the Financial Administration Act, I have the honour to 
transmit herewith the Public Accounts of Canada for 
the year ended March 31, 1985, to be laid by you before 
the House of Commons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Stewart D. Mclnnes, 
Receiver General for Canada. 



To The Honourable Stewart Mclnnes, 
Receiver General for Canada. 

Sir: 

I have the honour to submit the Public Accounts of 
Canada for the year ended March 31, 1985. 

Under Section 55(1) of the Financial Administration 
Act, the Public Accounts for each fiscal year shall be 
prepared by the Receiver General and shall be laid 
before the House of Commons by the President of the 
Treasury Board on or before the thirty-first day of 
December next following the end of that year, or if the 
House of Commons is not then sitting, within the first 
fifteen days next thereafter that the House of Commons 
is sitting. 

This annual report is presented in three volumes: 

Volume I — A survey of the transactions for the year 
including summary statements; the financial statements 
of Canada on which the Auditor General has expressed 
an opinion, namely, the statements of transactions, of 
revenue and expenditure on a gross and net basis, of the 
accumulated deficit, of the assets and liabilities of 
Canada and of the use of appropriations together with 
related notes; the observations by the Auditor General 
on the financial statements of Canada; analyses of out- 
lays and appropriations; analyses of budgetary revenue 
and expenditure, and of asset and liability accounts, 
together with those statements required by the Financial 
Administration Act to be published in the Public 
Accounts, and various other schedules and statements. 

Volume II — Details of the financial operations of the 
Government, segregated by department. 

Volume III — Contains an annual consolidated report 
on the businesses and activities of all parent Crown 
corporations together with a listing of all Crown corpo- 
rations and other corporate interests of Canada. 

The audited financial statements, contained in 
Volume I, are for the year ended March 31, 1985. They 
are, however, dated September 16, to allow for the 
closing and audit of accounts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. V. Hession, 
Deputy Receiver General for Canada. 



OTTAWA, DECEMBER 5, 1985 



OTTAWA, DECEMBER 5, 1985 



INTRODUCTION TO THE PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Nature of the Public Accounts 

The Public Accounts is the report of the Government 
of Canada prepared each fiscal year by the Receiver 
General as required by Section 55 of the Financial 
Administration Act. 

The report covers the fiscal year of the Government, 
which ends on March 31, and is prepared from data 
contained in the accounts of Canada and from more 
detailed records maintained in departments and agen- 
cies. The accounts of Canada is the centralized record of 
the Government's financial transactions maintained by 
the Receiver General in which the transactions of all 
departments and agencies are summarized. Each depart- 
ment is responsible for agreeing its accounts to the 
control accounts of the Receiver General, and maintains 
detailed records of the transactions in those accounts. 

The report covers the financial transactions of the 
Government during the year. In certain cases, parlia- 
mentary authority to undertake transactions was pro- 
vided by legislation approved in earlier years. 

Format of the Public Accounts 

The Public Accounts is produced in three volumes. 

Volume I 

Volume I presents a summary and analysis of the 
financial transactions of the Government. The content of 
the sections of Volume I can be summarized as follows: 

SECTION 1: summary statements of the financial 
transactions of the Government of Canada on both a 
Public Accounts and an Extended National Accounts 
basis; 

SECTION 2: audited financial statements of the 
Government of Canada, prepared in accordance with 
Section 55 of the Financial Administration Act; 

SECTION 3: observations by the Auditor General on 
the financial statements; 

SECTION 4: review of envelopes and outlays, and 
Estimates and appropriations; 

SECTION 5: review of budgetary revenue; 

SECTION 6: review of budgetary expenditure; 

SECTION 7: analysis of loans, investments and 
advances; 

SECTION 8: analysis of specified purpose accounts; 

SECTION 9: analysis of other liabilities; 

SECTION 10: analysis of foreign exchange accounts; 

SECTION 1 1 : analysis of unmatured debt; 

SECTION 12: analysis of other accounts reported on 
the Statement of Assets and Liabilities; 



SECTION 13: supplementary information required 
by the Financial Administration Act; and, 

SECTION 14: other miscellaneous information. 

Volume II 

Volume II presents the financial operations of the 
Government, segregated by department. It contains 
financial operations of individual departments and their 
associated agencies, and additional information and 
analysis. 

(a) DEPARTMENTAL FINANCIAL 
OPERATIONS 

In a fashion similar to the Estimates, Volume II 
uses a uniform set of statements to present each 
department's financial operations. In most respects, 
the level of detail is the same as in the Estimates, 
and provides the following information: 

(i) Use of Appropriations 

This is the principal departmental statement. 
It is a summary of the use of the authority given 
by Parliament in appropriation acts and other 
statutes. It displays, by program: 

— the wording of the relevant appropriations or 
statutes; 

— the amount authorized under each appro- 
priation or statute; 

— the total use made during the year of the 
authorized amounts; 

— unexpended balances (amounts lapsed and 
carried forward) or amounts overexpended; 
and, 

— total use for the previous year. 

(ii) Total Cost of Programs — Budgetary 

This table shows the total calculated cost for 
each program, by adding to budgetary expendi- 
ture, the values of services provided by other 
departments, and of accommodation provided by 
the reporting department and by the Department 
of Public Works, and by deducting non-tax 
receipts credited to revenue. 

The total calculated program cost is also re- 
flected in the Estimates and in the Public 
Accounts in the "Programs by Activity" table. 

(Hi) Programs by Activity — Budgetary 

This is a comparison of budgetary appropria- 
tions with actual expenditures and the imputed 
costs and revenues referred to in (ii). The table 



displays total program expenditures by activity 
and type of vote, and total cost of programs by 
type of vote. It is related to the "Program by 
Activities" table displayed in the Estimates. 

(iv) Grants and Contributions 

This table displays details of amounts appro- 
priated for grants and contributions, by class of 
recipients and by program, and the payments. 

(v) Budgetary Expenditure by Program and Stand- 
ard Object 

This table presents expenditure by standard 
object and relates to the "Objects of Expendi- 
ture" table shown in the Estimates. 

(vi) Revenue 

Each department displays summary and 
detailed statements of revenue collected as part 
of its operations. 

(vii) Revolving Funds 

The commercial orientation of a revolving fund 
is reflected in the balance sheet and statement of 
operations, or income and expenditure, presented 
each year. A revolving fund's minimum goal is 
the recovery of cost, and most commercial 
accounting conventions are used to measure cost. 

(viii) Other Entities 

To further the objectives of the Government 
and of departments, various entities such as 
departmental corporations have been created by 
appropriation acts and other legislation. Finan- 
cial statements for these entities are also shown. 



<b) ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND 
ANALYSIS 

Further details are provided, in Volume II, to 
supplement the statements already presented. This 
supplementary information includes: 

— accounts receivable and deletions (Section 30); 

— professional and special services (Section 31); 

— construction and acquisition of land, buildings, 
works, machinery and equipment (Section 32); 

— payments of damage claims, ex gratia pay- 
ments. Federal Court awards and nugatory 
payments (Section 33); 

— selected miscellaneous payments and federal- 
provincial shared-cost programs (Section 34); 

— grants and contributions (Section 35); and, 

— miscellaneous statements by department (Sec- 
tion 36). 

Volume III 

Volume III contains an annual consolidated report on 
the businesses and activities of all parent Crown corpo- 
rations together with a listing of all Crown corporations 
and other corporate interests of Canada. 



VOLUME 1 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



SECTION 

1 . Comparative Statements of Transactions. 

2. Audited Financial Statements of the Government of 
Canada. 

3. Observations by the Auditor General on the Finan- 
cial Statements of the Government of Canada. 

4. Envelopes and Outlays, Estimates and Appropria- 
tions. 

5. Budgetary Revenue. 

6. Budgetary Expenditure. 

7. Loans, Investments and Advances. 

8. Specified Purpose Accounts. 

9. Other Liabilities. 

10. Foreign Exchange Accounts. 

1 1 . Unmatured Debt. 

12. Other Accounts Reported on the Statement of 
Assets and Liabilities. 

13. Supplementary Information Required by the Finan- 
cial Administration Act. 

14. Other Miscellaneous Information. 

15. Index. 



SECTION 



1 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Comparative Statements 
of Transactions 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 1«3 

Summary statement of transactions — Public Accounts presen- 
tation • 1-4 

Summary statement of transactions — Extended National 
Accounts presentation 1-10 

Public Accounts and Extended National Accounts reconcilia- 
tion 1'15 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 



l'3 



INTRODUCTION 

In this section, the financial transactions of the Government 
of Canada are set out in summary form, with comparative 
figures for the previous four years. The financial transactions 
are first presented according to the accounting policies 
explained in Note 1 to the audited financial statements in 
Section 2 of this volume, referred to as the Public Accounts 
presentation; the second presentation is on the National 
Income and Expenditure Accounts basis, extended to encom- 
pass other financial transactions affecting the Consolidated 
Revenue Fund. This second form of presentation is referred to 
as the Extended National Accounts presentation. 

This section is intended to provide an overview of the 
Government's financial operations, both on the Public 
Accounts basis and on the Extended National Accounts basis. 
The Public Accounts presentation reflects the accounting 
procedures and conventions which have been adopted in pro- 
viding Parliament with an accounting of the source and use of 
financial resources. The National Accounts transactions sec- 
tion of the Extended National Accounts presentation is 
designed primarily to facilitate economic analysis of the feder- 
al Government sector on a basis consistent with that used in 
measuring income and expenditure flows in the economy. The 
remaining sections show the relation between the traditional 
budget balance on the National Accounts basis and the Gov- 
ernment's overall financial requirements, debt transactions and 
cash position. 

Public Accounts Presentation 

The "Summary Statement of Transactions" table provides 
aggregate data on the major categories of transactions under 
four main headings: budgetary, non-budgetary, foreign 
exchange and unmatured debt. The resulting cash position at 
the end of each year is also shown. 

This year's Public Accounts presentation includes for the 
first time, Canadian Ownership Special Charge revenues in 
budgetary revenue; this treatment is consistent with the May 
23, 1985 Budget presentation. On account of this reclassifica- 
tion of Canadian Ownership Special Charge revenues, how- 
ever, the Public Accounts presentation differs from the 
Department of Finance's Economic Review and the Statement 
of Financial Operations published each month in the Canada 
Gazette, but is compatible with other sections of the Public 
Accounts. 



For purposes of comparability, budgetary revenue and ex- 
penditure in this section treat Canada Post as a Crown corpo- 
ration for all years. This corporation was proclaimed on Octo- 
ber 16, 1981. 

It should be noted that figures for budgetary and non- 
budgetary items in the Public Accounts presentation for 1980- 
81 have not been adjusted to take account of some minor 
changes in departmental responsibilities and classification of 
accounts which may have occurred. Most components are, 
however, comparable from one year to the next. 



Extended National Accounts Presentation 

This section presents the Government's financial transac- 
tions on the Extended National Accounts basis. As in the 
Public Accounts presentation, the transactions are categorized 
under four main headings: the traditional National Income 
and Expenditure Accounts which are referred to as National 
Accounts transactions, loans and other transactions, foreign 
exchange and unmatured debt transactions. The resulting cash 
position at the end of each year is also shown. Starting with 
the line entitled "Financial requirements (excluding foreign 
exchange transactions)", the Extended National Accounts 
presentation is identical to the Public Accounts presentation. 

The total for loans and other transactions will differ from 
the non-budgetary transactions in the Public Accounts presen- 
tation due, in part, to differences in coverage. Loans to certain 
agencies such as Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, as well as 
advances to certain special funds, are excluded in arriving at 
the total of loans and other transactions on the Extended 
National Accounts presentation, because transactions of these 
agencies and special funds are included in the National 
Accounts transactions. Similarly, the receipts and disburse- 
ments of Government pension and social security accounts, 
such as the Unemployment Insurance Account, are included in 
the National Accounts. As a result, they are not included in 
the loans and other transactions adjustment. In determining 
the surplus or deficit on a National Accounts basis, certain 
revenue items, such as corporate income tax, are reflected on 
an accrual, as opposed to a cash basis. The loans and other 
transactions category includes the adjusting entry required to 
convert from an accrual basis of revenue and expenditure to a 
cash basis. 



1^4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SUMMARY STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS— PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 



Total financial requirements, excluding foreign exchange 
transactions, amounted to $29,611 million for the year ended 
March 31, 1985. The budgetary deficit of $36,917 million was 
partially offset by a source of $7,306 million for non-budge- 
tary transactions. Foreign exchange transactions decreased 
requirements by $2,233 million. Total financial requirements 
were $27,378 million in 1984-85. These transactions, together 



with the $26,824 million increase in unmatured debt, resulted 
in a $554 million reduction in the cash balance, bringing the 
March 31, 1985 cash balance to $5,858 million. 

Table 1.1 sets out the financial transactions of the Govern- 
ment for the five years 1980-81 to 1984-85 on a comparable 
basis. 



TABLE 1.1 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION^ 

SUMMARY STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 3 1 
1981 1982 

I. Budgetary transactions 

A. Revenue 

B. Expenditure 

Deficit 

II. Non-budgetary transactions 

A. Loans, investments and advances 

B. Specified purpose accounts*^' 

C. Other transactions 

.Net source 

Financial requirements (excluding foreign exchange transactions) .. 

III. Foreign exchange transactions'^' 

Total financial requirements'** 

IV. Unmatured debt transactions'^* 

Change in cash'^' 

V. Cash balance at end of year 5,931 6,620 4,579 6,412 5,858 

Details can be found in other sections of this volume. 

*" Consistent with the Statement of Transactions in Section 2 of this volume. 

'^' For purposes of presenting the transactions of the Government, specified purpose accounts include advances made to the Unemployment Insurance Account. 

'^* Unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies has been included as part of foreign exchange transactions. 

'*' Cash requirements ( - ). 

''* Cash decrease ( - ). 



1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


45,398 
-58,416 


54,854 
- 69,449 


56.012 
-80.001 


57,131 
-88,915 


64,137 
-101,054 


-13,018 


- 14,595 


- 23.989 


-31,784 


-36.917 


-423 

2,781 

393 


-1,800 
4,270 
2,941 


-768 

-212 
1.553 


-673 
4,399 
3,105 


510 

4.214 
2,582 


2,751 


5,411 


573 


6,831 


7,306 


- 10.267 


-9,184 


-23.416 


- 24.953 


-29,611 


1,307 


506 


-1,017 


168 


2.233 


- 8,960 


- 8,678 


- 24.433 


- 24.785 


- 27.378 


11,153 


9,367 


22.392 


26.618 


26.824 


2,193 


689 


-2,041 


1,833 


-554 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 



1*5 



I. Budgetary Transactions 

A. Revenue 

Total budgetary revenue increased $7,006 million or 12.3% 
to $64,137 million in 1984-85. Tax revenue increased $6,333 
million while non-tax revenue increased $673 million. 

Personal income tax revenue increased $2,287 million or 
8.5% compared to 2.4% in 1983-84. The growth in 1984-85 
revenue was accounted for by personal income growth of 7.5% 
in 1984, the capping of the 1984 indexation factor at 5% and 
the lowering of the federal tax reduction to $100 from $200 in 
1984. 

Corporate income tax collections were $9,379 million in 
1984-85 or $2,093 million above the 1983-84 level of $7,286 
million. The growth in 1984-85 collections reflects two post- 
recession years of strong growth in corporate profits of 54.8% 
and 21.2% in 1983 and 1984 respectively. 

On the energy side, 1984-85 revenue collections were slight- 
ly higher at $4,209 million compared to $4,036 million in 

TABLE 1.2 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 
DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



1983-84 as the setting of the Natural Gas and Gas Liquids 
Tax rate to zero, effective February 1, 1984, offsets the 
revenue gains from other energy taxes. 

Revenues from the sales tax and customs import duties 
increased 16.1% and 12.3% respectively from the 1983-84 
levels. A one percentage point increase in sales tax rates, 
effective October 1, 1984, and an increase in consumer and 
business spending in 1984 accounted for the increase in sales 
tax revenue while the increase in customs import duties 
reflects a strong increase in imports in 1984. 

Non-tax revenue increased to $6,330 million in 1984-85 
from the 1983-84 level of $5,657 million, reflecting a $624 
million increase in interest on advances to the Unemployment 
Insurance Account. Profits from the Bank of Canada were also 
greater by $108 million. 



Year ended March 3 1 



Budgetary traosactions 

A. REVENUE, Section 5 
Tax revenue — 
Income tax — 

Personal 

Corporation 

Non-resident 

Excise taxes and duties — 

Sales tax 

Customs import duties 

Excise duties 

Other 

Energy taxes — 
Petroleum and gas revenue tax and incremental oil revenue tax . 

Canadian Ownership special charge 

Oil export charges 

Excise tax — Gasoline 

Natural gas and gas liquids tax 

Special petroleum compensation charge 

Other tax revenue 

Total tax revenue 

Non-tax revenue — 
Return on investments — 

Bank of Canada 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Interest on bank deposits 

Exchange Fund Account 

Other return on investments 

Other non-tax revenue 

Total non-tax revenue 

Total revenue 



1981 



1982 



1983 



1984 



1985 



19,837 


24.046 


26,330 


26.967 


29.254 


8,106 


8.118 


7,139 


7.286 


9.379 


867 


1,018 


998 


908 


1,021 


28,810 


33.182 


34.467 


35.161 


39.654 


5.429 


6.185 


5.894 


6.660 


7.729 


3,188 


3.439 


2,831 


3,380 


3.796 


1,042 


1,175 


1.274 


1.356 


1.462 


573 


564 


685 


755 


850 


10.232 


11.363 


10.684 


12.151 


13.837 


27 


864 


1.960 


2.106 


2.563 




786 


889 


805 


850 


842 


519 


392 


215 


408 


453 


436 


408 


386 


404 


187 


998 

473 


1,264 


524 


-16 


1.509 


4.076 


4.913 


4.036 


4.209 


11.741 


15.439 


15.597 


16.187 


18.046 


99 


120 


132 


126 


107 


40.650 


48.741 


50,196 


51.474 


57,807 


1,459 


1.853 


1.879 


1.744 


1.8S2 


839 


873 


892 


941 


913 


243 


285 


346 


408 


452 


318 


701 


433 


395 


243 


620 


763 


812 


591 


414 


651 


615 


655 


668 


1,328 


4.130 


5.090 


5.017 


4.747 


5.202 


618 


1,023 


799 


910 


1,128 


4,748 


6.113 


5,816 


5.657 


6.330 



45.398 



54.854 



56.012 



57,131 



64.137 



»»ft 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



B. Expenditure 

Budgetary expenditure in 1984-85 increased 13.7% to 
$101,054 million, compared to increases of 11.1% in 1983-84 
and 15.2% in 1982-83. 

Public debt charges rose $4,405 million, or 24.3%, to 
$22,551 million in 1984-85, reflecting an increase in the 
unmatured debt outstanding during the year and higher inter- 
est rates. 

National Defence expenditures rose $954 million, or 1 2%, to 
$8,926 million in 1984-85. This reflects the Government's 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization commitment to increase 
defence expenditures by about 3% in real terms per annum. 

Old age security payments, including guaranteed income 
supplements and spouses' allowances, rose to $11,418 million 
or 9.7% above the level in 1983-84 of $10,406 million. This is 
above the increase in 1983-84 of 7.9% because of increased 
growth in the number of recipients and increases in the level of 
benefits. The increase in benefits includes guaranteed income 
supplement rate increases of $25 each on July 1, 1984 and 
November 1, 1984. 

Contributions to the provinces for hospital insurance, medi- 
cal care, and extended health care services increased 13.8%, or 

TABLE 1.3 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 
DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



$766 million, to $6,330 million in 1984-85 reflecting a sub- 
stantial retroactive payment in 1984-85. These Established 
Programs Financing (EPF) entitlements generally grow with 
the Gross National Product. The post-secondary education 
component of the EPF arrangements increased by $240 mil- 
lion to $2,492 million. 

The Petroleum Compensation Account registered a deficit 
of $1,240 million in 1984-85, an increase of $757 million over 
the 1983-84 deficit of $483 million. The increase in the deficit 
occurred despite a November 1984 revenue rate increase of 
$17.50 per cubic metre. This rate increase was more than 
offset by an increase in petroleum compensation payments. 

The Government's contribution to the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Account increased only 2.7% or $74 million, to $2,788 
million as a result of average unemployment levels remaining 
about the same in both years. The effects of the recession and 
high unemployment levels through 1984-85 account for the 
10.6% increase of $347 million in Canada Assistance Plan 
payments to $3,635 million. 



Budgetary transactions 
B. EXPENDITURE, Section 6 
Social development — 
Old age security beneHts, guaranteed income supplements and spouses' 

allowances 

Family allowances 

Canada Assistance Plan 

Government contribution to the Unemployment Insurance Account 

Established programs financing — 

Insurance and medical care services 

Education support 

Other 

Economic and regional development 

Fiscal arrangements 

External affairs and aid 

Defence 

Parliament and services to Government 

Total program expenditure 

Public debt 

Provision for valuation of assets and liabilities 

Total expenditure 



1981 



58,416 



Year ended March 31 



1982 



69,449 



1983 



80,001 



1984 



88,915 



1985 



7,418 


8,585 


9.643 


10,406 


11.418 


1,851 


2.020 


2.231 


2,326 


2.418 


1,941 


2.298 


2,832 


3.288 


3.635 


871 


957 


2.034 


2.714 


2.788 


3,982 


4.283 


4.060 


5.564 


6,330 


1,693 


1,730 


1,677 


2,252 


2,492 


8,401 


8,948 


10.919 


12,350 


13.632 


26.157 


28.821 


33.396 


38.900 


42.713 


9,246 


7.720 


10.598 


12.327 


13.827 


3,944 


4.750 


5.597 


5.878 


6.085 


1,073 


1.367 


1.568 


1.764 


2.117 


5,077 


6.028 


6.992 


7.972 


8.926 


2,612 


3.620 


3.154 


3.628 


4.035 


48,109 


52.306 


61,305 


70.469 


77.703 


10,687 


15.168 


16,971 


18,146 


22.551 


58,796 


67,474 


78.276 


88.615 


100,254 


-380 


1,975 


1.725 


300 


800 



101,054 



11. Non-budgetary Transactions 

A. Loans, Investments and Advances 

In 1984-85, loans, investments and advances were a net 
source of $510 million, compared to a requirement of $673 
million in 1983-84, for a net change of $1,183 million. This 
change includes a $200 million increase in the allowance for 
valuation. 



Loans, investments and advances to Crown corporations 
designated as lending institutions decreased by $570 million, 
from a source of $122 million in 1983-84, to a source of $692 
million in 1984-85, principally as a result of net repayments of 
$551 million by the Farm Credit Corporation and loan for- 
giveness of $308 million in the Mortgage Insurance Fund of 
the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. There were 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 



I'7 



higher net requirements for the Canada Deposit Insurance 
Corporation and the Federal Business Development Bank. 
Loans, investments and advances to other Crown corporations 
declined $581 million in 1984-85 reflecting principally a $660 
million decrease in payments to Petro-Canada. 

B. Specified Purpose Accounts 

Specified purpose accounts provided a net source of $4,214 
million in 1984-85 compared to a net source of $4,399 million 
in 1983-84. This decline of $185 million was in part attribut- 
able to $517 million higher net requirements for the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Account which had a requirement of $976 



million in 1984-85. This increased requirement is attributable 
to a $741 million interest payment from the Account. The 
remaining $332 million change in the net source is, mainly 
attributable to the superannuation accounts ($440 million), 
partly offset by a $211 million reduction in the net source for 
deposit and trust accounts. 

C. Other Transactions 

Other transactions provided a net source of $2,582 million 
in 1984-85 compared to $3,105 million in 1983-84. The 
decrease of $523 million is principally attributable to cash in 
transit ($695 million). 



TABLE 1.4 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 
DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 3 1 



II. Non-budgetary transactions^') 

A. LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES, Section 7 
Crown corporations — 

Lending institutions — 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Federal Business Development Bank 

All other Crown corporations — 

Air Canada 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Canada Development Investment Corporation 

Canadian National Railways 

Petro-Canada 

Other 

Other loans, investments and advances — 

Provincial and territorial governments 

National governments including developing countries 

International organizations (subscriptions less notes payable) 

Veterans' Land Act Fund advances less allowance for conditional 

benefits 

Joint and mixed enterprises 

Miscellaneous 

Loans, investments and advances before allowance 

Allowance for valuation of assets 

Total loans, investments and advances after allowance for valuation of 
assets 

B. SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS, Section 8 
Liability accounts — 

Canada Pension Plan Account 

Superannuation accounts 

Unemployment Insurance Account 

Government Annuities Account 

Deposit and trust accounts 

Provincial tax collection agreements account 

Other 

Total specified purpose accounts 

C. OTHER TRANSACTIONS, Sections 9 and 12 

Cash in transit 

Other liabilities 

Total other transactions 

Net non-budgetary transactions before allowance for valuation of assets 

Allowance for valuation of assets 

Net non-budgetary transactions after allowance for valuation of assets 

<" Source/requirement ( - ). 



1981 



2,751 



1982 



S.41I 



1983 



573 



1984 



6,831 



1985 





-200 


60 


140 


-40 


-66 


-199 


-30 


194 


364 


124 


52 


-40 


-5 


39 


-270 


-348 


-394 


-379 


172 


101 


125 


145 


172 


157 


-111 


-570 


-259 


122 


692 


13 


14 


16 


17 


18 


697 


8 


3 


37 


38 


-2 




-308 


5 


18 


-t 




-41 


-62 


2 


-440 


-840 


- 1.354 


-660 




275 


-359 


101 


130 


-28 


535 


-1.177 


- 1.583 


-533 


48 


424 


- 1,747 


- 1,842 


-411 


740 


247 


28 


-41 


35 


67 


-309 


-276 


-273 


-167 


-172 


-110 


-166 


-213 


-335 


-378 


37 


29 


28 


31 


32 


-5 


-6 


-58 


-10 


- Ill 


-77 


-12 


-19 


-116 


-168 


-217 


-403 


-576 


-562 


-730 


207 


-2.150 


-2.418 


-973 


10 


-630 


350 


1,650 


300 


500 


-423 


-1.800 


-768 


-673 


510 


173 


170 


165 


152 


211 


2.307 


3.014 


3,483 


3.862 


4.302 


-682 


-15 


- 3.289 


-459 


-976 


-15 


-21 


-22 


-26 


-29 


241 


1.129 


-223 


532 


321 


728 


-56 


-384 


277 


309 


29 


49 


58 


61 


76 


2,781 


4.270 


-212 


4.399 


4.214 


-693 


16 


-736 


689 


-6 


1,086 


2,925 


2.289 


2,416 


2.588 


393 


2,941 


1.553 


3.105 


2.582 


3.381 


5,061 


-1,077 


6.531 


6.806 


-630 


350 


1,650 


300 


500 



7.306 



1*8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



III. Foreign Exchange Transactions 

Foreign exchange transactions include the operations of the 
Exchange Fund Account, the objective of which is to assist in 
maintaining orderly conditions in the exchange markets and to 
effect foreign currency payments by various departments for 
the purchase of goods and services. Also included in foreign 
exchange transactions are subscriptions and notes payable to 
the International Monetary Fund, together with Special Draw- 
ing Rights. Total foreign exchange transactions provided a 
source in Canadian dollars of $2,233 million in 1984-85 
compared to $168 million in 1983-84. 

IV. Unmatured Debt Transactions 

Marketable bonds payable in Canadian currency increased 
in 1984-85 by $12,379 million and Canada savings bonds by 



$3,756 million; net sales of Treasury bills amounted to $10,600 
million. In total, net unmatured debt payable in Canadian 
currency increased by $26,824 million in 1984-85 compared to 
an increase of $26,618 million in 1983-84. 



V. Cash Balance at End of Year 

Financial requirements, including foreign exchange transac- 
tions, amounted to $27,378 million. This was largely financed 
by $26,824 million in unmatured debt transactions. The excess 
of the increase in financial requirements over unmatured debt 
resulted in a decrease in the cash balance at March 31, 1985 
to $5,858 million, or $554 million below the March 31, 1984 
level of $6,412 million. 



TABLE 1.5 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 
DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 3 1 



III. Foreignexchange transactions" \ Section 10 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances 

International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 

Less: International Monetary Fund — Notes payable 

Special Drawing Rights allocations 

Unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies 

Total foreign exchange transactions 

IV. Unmatured debt transactions"*. Section 1 1 

Marketable bonds 

Canada savings bonds 

Special non-marketable bonds issued to the Canada Pension Plan Invest- 
ment Fund 

Treasury bills 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. to be repaid by the 
Government — 

Canadian currency 

Foreign currencies 

Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies 

Less: 
Government's holdings of unmatured debt — 

Marketable bonds 

Canada savings bonds held on account of employees 

Special non-marketable bonds issued to the Canada Pension Plan 

Investment Fund 

Unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies 

Total unmatured debt transactions payable in Canadian currency 

V. Cash balance at end of year. Section 1 2 

In Canadian currency 

In foreign currencies 

Total cash balance 

"' Source/requirement { - ). 



1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1,263 


-237 


- 1,990 


767 


-778 


-930 


181 


64 


- 1,279 


10 


333 


-56 


- 1.926 


-512 


-768 


-715 


2 


44 


-961 


-32 


-175 


70 


24 


-18 


2 


-890 


72 


68 


-979 


-30 


84 


634 


977 


-299 


2,971 


1,307 


506 


-1,017 


168 


2,233 


7,834 


3,000 


4,989 


7,273 


12,379 


- 2,269 


9,166 


7,663 


5,563 


3,756 


23 


18 


17 


18 


16 


5,445 


- 2,395 


9,750 


12,575 
150 


10,600 
-50 


150 


853 


160 


-279 


133 


-5 


-585 


703 


1,214 


2,904 


11.178 


10.057 


23.282 


26.514 


29.738 


-83 


14 


-110 


164 


-122 


1 


24 


6 


13 


49 


23 


18 


17 


18 


16 


84 


634 


977 


-299 


2,971 


25 


690 


890 


-104 


2.914 


11,153 


9,367 


22,392 


26,618 


26,824 


5,826 


6,541 


4,193 


6,329 


5,779 


105 


79 


386 


83 


79 



5,931 



6,620 



4,579 



6,412 



5,858 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 
TABLE 1.6 



1*9 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 
DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 31 



CANADA PENSION PLAN 
Receipts — 

Employer and employee contributions 

Investment income 

Disbursements — 

Pensions 

Administration expenses 

Net 

Investments — Provincial government securities in Investment Fund. 

Total (net) Canada Pension Plan 

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACCOUNT 
Receipts — 

Government contribution*" 

Employer and employee contributions 

Investment income 

Disbursements — 

Benefits*" 

Interest payments 

Administration expenses 

Total (net'^') Unemployment Insurance Account 



1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


2.689 
1.519 

-2.011 
-67 


3.282 
1.850 

- 2.456 
-76 


3,446 
2,236 

- 3,036 
-85 


3,716 
2,534 

- 3.657 
-89 


3.879 
2.889 

- 4.224 
-100 


2.130 
- 1.957 


2,600 
- 2,430 


2,561 
- 2,396 


2,504 
- 2,352 


2,444 
- 2,233 



173 



170 



165 



152 



211 



946 

3,399 

13 


1,047 

4,887 

38 


2,148 
5,039 

2 


2.854 
7,465 

1 


2.946 

7.777 
2 


- 4,524 
-516 


-5,318 

-6 

-663 


- 9.677 

-10 

-791 


-9.816 
-117 
-846 


- 10.048 
-741 
-912 



-682 



15 



3.289 



459 



976 



SUPERANNUATION ACCOUNTS 
Public Service Superannuation Account — 
Receipts — 

Government contribution 

Employee contributions 

Public Service corporations — Employer and employee contributions . 

Interest 

Actuarial liability adjustment 

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Change in unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 

Net 

Canadian Forces Superannuation Account — 
Receipts — 

Government contribution 

Employee contributions 

Interest 

Actuarial liability adjustment 

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Change in unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 

Net 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Account — 
Receipts — 

Government contribution 

Employee contributions 

Interest 

Actuarial liability adjustment 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Change in unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 

Net ..: 

Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account — 
Receipts — 

Government contribution 

Employee contributions •• 

Public Service corporations — Employer and employee contributions 

Other 

Disbursements — 

Annuities 

Other 

Net 

Total (net) superannuation accounts 

'" Including benefits to fishermen. 

<^' Net of non-interest bearing and interest bearing advances. 



288 


321 


339 


349 


373 


314 


331 


339 


362 


379 


57 


128 


232 


239 


246 


608 


837 


981 


1.261 


1,616 


559 


951 


267 






10 


14 


21 


21 


21 


-409 


-466 


-523 


-576 


-647 


-61 


-65 


-45 


-42 


-49 


- 104 


-375 


301 


481 


356 


1.262 


1,676 


1.912 


2.095 


2.295 


142 


159 


183 


200 


212 


80 


91 


105 


113 


120 


480 


618 


755 


933 


1.125 


252 


454 


286 


20 




I 


1 


2 


2 


2 


-267 


-292 


-315 


-336 


-363 


-14 


-15 


-12 


-10 


-13 


19 


-151 


20 


239 


203 


693 


865 


1.024 


1.161 


1.286 


44 


52 


61 


65 


67 


22 


27 


31 


34 


34 


59 


68 


103 


127 


157 


38 


51 


5 






-13 


- 16 


-19 


-21 


-24 


-3 


-3 


-2 


-2 


-2 


-12 


-21 


17 


22 


19 


135 


158 


196 


225 


251 


74 


88 


81 


94 


100 


75 


83 


87 


94 


100 


10 


24 


43 


45 


46 


94 


159 


180 


185 


260 


-25 


-26 


-31 


-27 


-25 


- 11 


-13 


-9 


-10 


-11 


217 


315 


351 


381 


470 


2.307 


3.014 


3.483 


3,862 


4.302 



I'lO 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SUMMARY STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS— EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS 
PRESENTATION 



The National Income and Expenditure Accounts were de- 
veloped as a basis for economic analysis of income and expen- 
diture flows in the economy. The concepts and definitions 
applied to the Government sector are consistent with those 
applied to other sectors and follow international practices 
developed under the aegis of the United Nations. The econom- 
ic nature of a transaction is the determining factor in its 
classification within the National Accounts framework. The 
Extended National Accounts present, in addition to the tradi- 
tional National Accounts revenue, expenditure and balance 
shown here under the heading "National Accounts transac- 
tions", the items which account for the difference between the 



National Accounts budget balance and total financial require- 
ments on the Public Accounts basis. 

In 1984-85, National Accounts transactions resulted in a 
deficit of $32,208 million. Loans and other transactions repre- 
sented a net source of $2,597 million. Foreign exchange trans- 
actions decreased requirements by $2,233 million and 
unmatured debt transactions provided a source of $26,824 
million. As previously noted, foreign exchange and unmatured 
debt transactions are identical to those reported in the Public 
Accounts presentation. 



TABLE L7 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 

SUMMARY STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984 



72,079 
97,362 



25,283 



6.412 



1985 



78,792 
111,000 



- 32,208 



Year ended March 3 1 
1981 1982 [983 

I. National Accounts transactions' ' ' 

A. Revenue*-' 53,41 1 66,71 1 67,580 

B. Expenditure'" -62,883 -75,704 -89,565 

DeHcit - 9.472 - 8,993 -21,985 

II. Loans and other transactions 

A. Loans, investments and advances 

B. Accrual accounts 

C. Other transactions 

Net source or requirement ( - ) 

Financial requirements (excluding foreign exchange transactions) 

III. Foreign excliange transactions'^' 

Total financial requirements'''' 

IV. Unmatured debt transactions''" 

Change in cash""' 

V. Cash balance at end of year 5,931 6,620 4,579 

<■> These "National Accounts transactions" are consistent with those released by Statistics Canada on November 29, 1985. 

<^' j'Total revenue" plus "Capital consumption allowances" as per Statistics Canada's National Income and Expenditure Accounts. 

m1 "^"'■'"^"' expenditures" plus "Gross capital formation" as per Statistics Canada's National Income and Expenditure AccounU. 

< ' Unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies has been included as part of foreign exchange transactions. 

<" Cash requirements { - ). 

<*' Cash decrease ( - ). 



-534 

-1,214 

953 


-1,739 
-277 
1,825 


-596 

- 1,033 

198 


-881 
505 
706 


502 

1.287 

808 


-795 


-191 


-1,431 


330 


2,597 


- 10.267 


-9,184 


-23,416 


- 24,953 


-29,611 


1,307 


506 


-1,017 


168 


2,233 


- 8,960 


- 8,678 


- 24,433 


- 24,785 


- 27,378 


11,153 


9,367 


22,392 


26,618 


26,824 


2,193 


689 


-2,041 


1,833 


-554 



5,858 



P*! 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 



I'll 



I. National Accounts Transactions 



A. Revenue 

On a National Accounts basis, total revenue increased 
$6,713 million or 9.3% in 1984-85. This compares with an 
increase of $7,006 million or 12.3% on a Public Accounts 
basis. The differences in growth rates relate to conceptual 
differences in treatment between the National Accounts and 
the Public Accounts. 

These conceptual differences are mainly as follows: 

(a) There are differences in the treatment of energy taxes. 
The petroleum compensation charge is included in reve- 
nue in the National Accounts but is excluded from 
revenue in the Public Accounts. In 1984-85, this item 
amounted to $2,291 million or 25% over the 1983-84 
level. 

(b) Direct taxes on persons in the National Accounts include 
employer-employee contributions to unemployment in- 
surance and Government pension funds. These items, 
which are excluded from Public Accounts budgetary 
revenue, amounted to $9,658 million in 1984-85; this 
was 6% above the 1 983-84 level of $9, 1 1 4 million. 

(c) Investment income on a National Accounts basis does 
not include profits from gold sales, which are included in 
the Public Accounts. However, in addition to the other 
"return on investments" categories of the Public 
Accounts, the National Accounts investment income 
includes interest on superannuation accounts and imput- 
ed banking services and is reduced by the amount of 
deficits of Government business enterprises. Interest on 
superannuation accounts, interest on loans and advances, 
imputed banking services and net profits of Government 
business enterprises amounted to $3,775 million, $2,265 
million, $75 million and $1,738 million respectively in 
1984-85, compared to $3,303 million, $2,220 million, 
$80 million and $1,113 million respectively in 1983-84. 
For these four categories together, the growth was 
$1,137 million in 1984-85 or 16.9%. 

{d) In the National Accounts, corporate tax revenue is 
recorded on a liability basis rather than on the Public 
Accounts collection basis. In addition, the National 
Accounts amount includes the Petroleum and Gas Reve- 
nue Tax and the Incremental Oil Revenue Tax, which 
are reported as a separate item in the Public Accounts 
presentation of energy taxes. In 1984-85, corporate 
liabilities increased $1,093 million or 10.1% compared to 
an increase of $2,093 million or 28.7% for collections on 
a Public Accounts basis. 

(e) In addition, the National Accounts include capital con- 
sumption allowances which are excluded from the Public 
Accounts. In 1984-85, capital consumption allowances 
amounted to $1,299 million or 10.5% above the 1983-84 
level of $ 1 , 1 76 million. 

With respect to the broad categories, direct taxes from 
persons on a National Accounts basis increased in 1984-85 by 
$2,310 million or 6.5%. As already indicated, corporate liabili- 
ties were up $1,093 million or 10.1%. Indirect taxes increased 
$1,931 million or 11.7% reflecting revenue increases across 
most indirect tax components. Investment income rose $1,137 
million or 16.9%, reflecting higher interest earned on Govern- 



ment-held public funds and higher net remitted profits of 
Government business enterprises. 



B. Expenditure 

Federal Government expenditure on a National Accounts 
basis was $111,000 million in 1984-85, an increase of $13,638 
million or 14% over 1983-84. This compares with an increase 
of $12,139 million or 13.7% on a Public Accounts basis. As 
with the revenue, the differences. in value terms and growth 
rates reflect conceptual differences which are mainly as 
follows: 

(a) In the National Accounts, petroleum compensation pay- 
ments are recorded on a gross accrual basis. In the 
Public Accounts, the petroleum compensation account is 
recorded on a net basis with revenues credited to expen- 
ditures. On a National Accounts basis, petroleum com- 
pensation payments were $3,486 million in 1984-85 as 
compared to $2,263 million in 1983-84, for an increase 
of $1,223 million or 54%. This increase of $1,223 million 
was $466 million above the Public Accounts p)etroleum 
compensation account expenditure increase of $757 
million. 

(b) The National Accounts substitutes the expenditures of 
identified funds and agencies for Government transfers 
to these funds and agencies. Similarly, transfer payments 
to persons in the National Accounts expenditures include 
unemployment insurance benefits and public service pen- 
sion payments instead of the Government's contributions 
to the Unemployment Insurance Account and pension 
funds. These unemployment insurance and pension ben- 
efit payments, which are not included in Public Accounts 
budgetary expenditure, amounted together to $12,464 
million or 5.3% above the 1983-84 level of $11,803 
million. 

(c) Deficits of Government business enterprises are deduct- 
ed in the National Accounts from revenue, while in the 
Public Accounts they are included in expenditures. 

(d) The National Accounts expenditures exclude identified 
reserves or write-offs such as the provision for valuation 
which is included in budgetary expenditures. 

{e) As with revenue, the National Accounts expenditures 
include capital consumption allowances which are 
excluded from Public Accounts expenditures. 

Transfer payments to other levels of government increased 
to $20,361 million or 9.9% in 1984-85 compared with growth 
rates of 15% in 1983-84 and 10.8% in 1982-83. While pay- 
ments under the taxation agreements decreased slightly by $51 
million, or 0.9% to $5,665 million, federal contributions to the 
provinces for hospital insurance, medical care and post-second- 
ary education increased 13.4% in 1984-85 to $7,586 million. 
Canada Assistance Plan payments to the provinces rose $293 
million, or 8.8%, to $3,631 million in 1984-85 because of 
continuing high levels of unemployment. Other transfers to the 
provinces increased significantly mainly due to the payments 
for official languages education. 



1'12 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Transfer payments to persons increased $2,160 million or 
7.6% in 1984-85 compared with rates of increase of 9.1% and 
31.5% in 1983-84 and 1982-83 respectively. Old age security 
benefits grew 9.8%, or $1,008 million to $11,304 million in 
1984-85. The increase in unemployment insurance benefits of 
2.4% or $237 million to $10,120 million reflects slight declines 
in the number of beneficiaries and eligible benefit weeks offset 
by an increase in the average benefits paid. Following 
increases of 14.5% in 1982-83 and 13.8% in 1983-84, Govern- 
ment pensions for 1984-85 increased 9.5% to $1,848 million. 
The "other transfers to persons" category grew $661 million or 
15.8% in 1984-85 due mainly to the Government's job creation 
programs and contributions to native peoples for the provision 
of education, economic and social services. 

Total current goods and services grew 10% to $22,433 
million which is between increases of 13.1% in 1982-83 and 6% 
in 1983-84. Defence goods and services expenditures increased 
$935 million, or 12.2%, in 1984-85, while non-defence goods 
and services expenditures increased $1,111 million, or 8.7%, to 
$13,817 million. Wages, salaries and supplementary labour 
income increased $495 million, or 4.7% to $10,956 million, 
while military pay and allowances increased $193 million, or 
7.9%, to $2,633 million in 1984-85. Other current goods and 
services increased significantly by $1,235 million, or 19.6%, to 
$7,545 million in 1984-85, primarily due to military capital 
expenditures. 



Interest on the public debt rose $4,329 million or 24% in 
1984-85, compared to increases of 7.4% in 1983-84 and 13.2% 
in 1982-83, because of higher interest rates and an increase in 
outstanding debt. 

The substantial increase in gross capital formation of 51 .1%, 
or $965 million, to $2,852 million reflects the continuing 
impact of new capital projects under the Special Recovery 
Capital Projects Program introduced in the April 1983 
Budget. The growth in 1984-85 in current transfers to non- 
residents of 20.7%, or $264 million, to $1,539 million, reflects 
the Government's commitment to Official Development 
Assistance. 

Subsidies increased significantly in 1984-85 by $1,889 mil- 
lion or 32.2% to $7,762 million. This is explained by the 
increase of $160 million in 1984-85 for oil import compensa- 
tion payments to $738 million, and by the increase in synthetic 
oil subsidies to $2,748 million which resulted from the 
depreciation of the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar 
and larger volume of oil qualifying for New Oil Reference 
Price subsidies. The other subsidies category grew 18.3% to 
$4,276 million mainly because of the western grain stabiliza- 
tion payments. In addition, capital assistance increased 5.2%, 
or $156 million, to $3,131 million in 1984-85 as the Petroleum 
Incentives Program payments were up compared to 1983-84. 



TABLE 1.8 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 3 1 



National Accounts transactions 

A. REVENUE— 
Direct taxes — 

Persons 

Corporations 

Non-residents 

Total direct taxes 

Indirect taxes 

Other current transfers from persons . 

Investment income 

Capital consumption allowances 

Total revenue 

B. EXPENDITURE— 

Current goods and services — 

Defence 

Non-defence 

Total current goods and services. 

Transfer payments to persons 

Subsidies 

Capital assistance 

Current transfers to non-residents 

Interest on the public debt 

Transfers to provinces 

Transfers to local governments 

Gross capital formation 

Total expenditure 

Deficit 



1981 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


24.536 


30,563 


33,209 


35.713 


38,023 


9,014 


8,902 


9,472 


10.844 


11,937 


932 


1,163 


1,116 


1.051 


1,170 


34.482 


40.628 


43.797 


47.608 


51.130 


13,339 


19,207 


16,609 


16.555 


18,486 


16 


15 


15 


24 


24 


4,736 


5,917 


6,110 


6,716 


7,853 


838 


944 


1,049 


1,176 


1,299 


53,411 


66,711 


67,580 


72,079 


78,792 


5,072 


5,820 


7,035 


7,681 


8.616 


9,361 


11,181 


12,187 


12,706 


13,817 


14.433 


17.001 


19.222 


20.387 


22.433 


17,114 


19,776 


26,005 


28,361 


30.521 


5,697 


6,374 


5,830 


5,873 


7,762 


656 


871 


3.122 


2.975 


3.131 


779 


943 


1.069 


1.275 


1.539 


10,544 


14,855 


16.821 


18.072 


22,401 


12,574 


14,217 


15.826 


18.214 


20.017 


303 


322 


283 


318 


344 


783 


1,345 


1.387 


1,887 


2,852 


62,883 


75,704 


89,565 


97,362 


111,000 



■ 9,472 



8,993 



21,985 



-25,283 



- 32,208 



COMPARA TIVE STA TEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 

II. Loans and Other Transactions 

A. Loans, Investments and Advances 

Loans, investments and advances, on an Extended National 
Accounts basis, were a source of $502 million in 1984-85, a 
change of $1,383 million from the 1983-84 requirement of 
$881 million. Loans to other governments and miscellaneous 
loans created a requirement of $806 million in 1984-85 and 
$1,332 million in 1983-84. Loans, investments and advances to 
lending institutions provided a source of $737 million in 1984- 
85 compared to $166 million in 1983-84. 

B. Accrual Accounts 

This category reflects mainly the difference between the 
modified cash recording on the Public Accounts basis and the 



I-I3 



accrual recording on the National Accounts basis. The catego- 
ry also records several items such as cash in transit, accounts 
payable and accrued interest; these items are generally of a 
capital nature and are not included in the National Accounts 
revenue and expenditure categories. These accrual accounts 
were a source of $1,287 million in 1984-85 as compared to 
$505 million in 1983-84. 

C. Other Transactions 

Other transactions provided a source of $808 million in 
1984-85 compared to $706 million in 1983-84. This category 
includes the provincial tax collection agreements account, 
deposit and trust accounts, and other transactions that are not 
included in National Accounts revenue and expenditure. 



1'14 
TABLE 1.9 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS PRESENTATION 

DETAILED STATEMENT OF TRANSACTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Loans and other transactions 

A. LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES— 
Lending institutions — 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Veterans' Land Act 

Federal Business Development Bank 

Municipal Development and Loan Board 

Regional economic development — 
Stabilization and development loans to provinces . 

Regional Industrial Expansion 

Electrical loans 

Transportation and communications — 

Air Canada 

Canadian National Railways 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Other 

Loans to other levels of government — 

Other levels of governments — Domestic 

Other governments — International 

International organizations 

Miscellaneous— 

Petro-Canada 

Other 

Allowance for valuation of assets 

Total loans, investments and advances 

B. ACCRUAL ACCOUNTS— 

Interest and matured debt 

Supplementary period accounts 

Corporate income tax 

Oil export charges 

Gross capital formation 

Outstanding cheques and warrants 

Allowance for valuation of certain liabilities 

Total accrual accounts 

C. OTHER TRANSACTIONS— 

Provincial tax collection agreements account 

Other 

Total other transactions 

Net source or requirement ( - ) 



1981 



13 
-8 
188 



Year ended March 3 1 



1982 



14 



1983 



16 

-41 



1984 



17 
-62 



1985 





-200 


60 


140 


-40 


-66 


-199 


-30 


194 


364 


19 


3 


-40 


-5 


39 


-270 


-348 


-394 


-379 


172 


37 


29 


28 


31 


32 


101 


125 


145 


172 


157 


12 


12 


12 


13 


13 



- 167 


-578 


-219 


166 


737 


8 
-8 
-3 


9 
13 
-1 


9 
102 

-4 


9 

22 
-6 


10 
40 
-3 


-3 


21 


107 


25 


47 





9 


-7 


5 


4 


193 


23 


-32 


-40 


24 


167 
-229 
-110 


-7 
-256 
-166 


-84 
-273 
-213 


-4 
-167 
-335 


30 

-172 
-378 


-172 


-429 


-570 


-506 


-520 


-440 
10 


-840 
-286 


- 1,354 
-178 


-659 

-167 


-286 


-430 


- 1,126 


- 1,532 


-826 


-286 


45 


350 


1,650 


300 


500 


-534 


- 1,739 


-596 


-881 


502 



399 


1,848 


1,677 


1.212 


1,166 


-742 


- 3,267 


-1,200 


122 


-76 


-737 


115 


- 1,090 


- 1,306 


-87 


-21 


97 


-643 


-21 


-86 


-222 


129 


100 


-147 


-223 


9 


29 


208 


516 


376 


100 


772 


-85 


129 


217 



-1,214 


-277 


- 1,033 


505 


1.287 


728 
225 


-56 
1,881 


-384 
582 


277 
429 


309 
499 


953 


1,825 


198 


706 


808 



795 



191 



- 1,431 



330 



2.597 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENTS OF TRANSACTIONS 



1'I5 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS AND EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS RECONCILIATION 



While the Public Accounts and the Extended National 
Accounts presentations result in the same total financial 
requirement figures, differences exist in the treatment of trans- 
actions in arriving at the budgetary surplus or deficit on a 
Public Accounts basis and the surplus or deficit on an Extend- 
ed National Accounts basis. These differences are offset in the 
non-budgetary components of total financial requirements. 

The reconciliation of transactions according to the two 
systems of accounts is set out in the tables that follow. The 
major factors which give rise to the need for a reconciliation 
are listed below. 

The deficits of Government business enterprises which are 
outside the Government accounting entity are, for Public 
Accounts presentation purposes, met through budgetary 
appropriations and thus recorded as budgetary expenditure. In 
the National Accounts presentation, these deficits, including 
the deficit of the Canada Post Corporation, are netted against 
Government investment income. 

Revenue in the Public Accounts is recorded on a cash basis. 
While the major portion of National Accounts revenue is 
accounted for on a cash basis, certain items, such as corporate 
income taxes and the oil export charges, are reported on an 
accrual basis. 

Transactions of employee pension accounts and the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Account are treated as non-budgetary in 



the Public Accounts, although the Government's statutory 
contributions to these accounts and interest payments on the 
Government's liability to these accounts form part of budget- 
ary expenditure. Employer and employee contributions to 
these accounts, plus any related interest income, form part of 
Government revenue in the Extended National Accounts pres- 
entation, and benefit payments form part of Government 
expenditure. 

In the Public Accounts presentation, the purchase of capital 
assets such as buildings and machinery is recorded as a 
budgetary expenditure in the year of acquisition. Only newly 
produced capital assets and capital expenditures are included 
in National Accounts expenditure. Both Government revenue 
and expenditure include an allowance for the depreciation of 
capital assets in the latter framework while no such provision 
is made in the Public Accounts presentation. 

The Extended National Accounts universe includes certain 
Government agencies which are not part of the Public 
Accounts universe. The actual financial transactions of those 
agencies form part of Extended National Accounts revenue 
and expenditure. Transfers and loans to these agencies are 
thus not accounted for in the Extended National Accounts 
presentation. 



TABLE 1.10 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS AND EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS RECONCILIATION 

REVENUE 

(in millions of dollars) 



Ye ar ended March 31 

1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 

Budgetary revenue-Public Accounts 45,398 54.854 56.012 57.131 64.137 

Reconciling items — „/,,»« « c-n ,t ai^ tiAon 

Government pension and social security receipts 6.599 8.909 9.571 12.476 13.4W 

Corporate income tax— Excess of accruals over collections 737 -115 1,090 1.306 »/ 

CapUal consumption allowances 838 944 1.049 .176 1.299 

Petroleum com,5ensation charge^ 1.459 3.855 2.743 1.833 2.291 

Non-tax revenu> -365 -432 -480 -535 -628 

Deficits of Government business enterprises -1,124 -'•7°^ ~ A^l ~ Ll on* 

Miscellaneous^^) - >31 »«' -'-246 -96 -_905_ 

Total revenue-Extended National Accounts 53.411 66.711 67.580 72.079 78.792 

(') In the Public Accounts, the petroleum compensation charge is netted against petroleum compensation payments and included in budgetary expenditure. Gross 

revenues and payments are recorded in the National Accounts. . ,., . • .u n. ur ».^^ ., «,. ^.•.•/i 

(2) Various items of non-tax revenue, such as service fees and proceeds from the sale of current goods, which are reported as revenue in the Public Accounts, are netted 

to expenditure in the National Accounts. ..,,-, u • . . .• .__ u/^>.,. n.^:« 

(') MajoV items under the miscellaneous caption include adjustments for proceeds from the sale of used capital assets he air transportation Ux. Western Gram 
Stabilization receipts, imputed items, and the treatment of revenue in the supplementary accounting period after March 31. 



1.16 PUBLIC A CCOUNTS, 1 984-85 

TABLE 1.11 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS AND EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS RECONCILIATION 

EXPENDITURE 

(in millions of dollars) 

Year ended March 31 



1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 



Budgetary expenditure— Public Accounts 58,416 69,449 80,001 88,915 101,054 

Reconciling items — 

Government pension and social security disbursements 5,852 7,026 11,308 11,808 12,464 

Net expenditure of funds and agencies'" 769 901 797 985 1,232 

Capital consumption allowances 838 944 1,049 1,176 1,299 

Petroleum compensation program'^) 900 3,804 2,934 1,685 2,246 

Non-tax revenue'^) -365 -432 -480 -535 -628 

Deficits of Government business enterprises -1,124 -1,485 -1,159 -1,212 -979 

Budgetary transfers to funds and agencies -1,737 -2,789 -2,202 -5,050 -5,385 

Miscellaneous'"' -666 - 1,714 - 2.683 -410 -303 

Total expenditure— Extended National Accounts 62,883 75,704 89,565 97,362 111,000 

'" In the National Accounts, budgetary appropriations to various funds and agencies are replaced by net actual expenditures of the funds and agencies. 

'^> This item represents the difference between the gross payments recorded on the National Accounts basis and net payments recorded on the Public Accounts basis. 

'^' Various non-tax revenues, such as service fees and proceeds from the sale of current goods, which are reported as revenue in the Public Accounts, are netted to 

expenditure in the National Accounts. 
'"' Major items under the mir.cellaneous caption include adjustments for reserves and write-offs, a provision for the valuation of assets and liabilities, purchase of used 

capital assets, imputed items, and the treatment of expenditure in the supplementary accounting period after March 31. 



TABLE 1.12 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS AND EXTENDED NATIONAL ACCOUNTS RECONCILIATION 

NON-BUDGETARY 



(in millions of dollars) 



Year ended March 31 



1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 



Non-budgetary transactions— Public Accounts 2,751 5,411 573 6,831 7,306 

Reconciling items — 

Government pension and social security accounts .Z -1,849 -3,240 -252 -3,713 -3,430 

Corporate income tax — Excess of accruals over collections -737 115 -1,090 -1,306 -87 

Miscellaneous'" -960 -2,477 -662 - 1,482 - 1,192 



Total loans and other transactions— Extended National Accounts -795 -191 -1,431 330 2,597 

' ' ' Major items under the miscellaneous caption include adjustments for a provision for the valuation of assets and liabilities, and the treatment of revenue and 
expenditure in the supplementary accounting period after March 3 1 . 



SECTION 



2 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Audited 

Financial Statements 
of the Government 
of Canada 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Statement of responsibility and preface 2.2 

Statement of transactions 2.5 

Statement of revenue and expenditure 2.6 

Statement of accumulated deficit 2.7 

Statement of assets and liabilities 2.8 

Statement of use of appropriations 2.10 

Notes to the financial statements of the Government of Canada 2.1 1 
Opinion of the Auditor General on the financial statements of 

the Government of Canada 2.18 



STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY 

AND PREFACE TO THE 
AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



The financial statements in this section were prepared by the Government of Canada in 
accordance with the accounting policies set out in Note 1 to the statements, and on a basis 
consistent with that of the preceding year, after giving retroactive effect to the change in 
accounting policies described in Note 2. The fundamental purpose of the financial statements 
is to provide information to Parliament and thus to the public, to facilitate an understanding 
and evaluation of: 
— the financial affairs of Canada that were administered by the Government; and 
— the nature and extent of the financial responsibilities entrusted to the Government in a 
given fiscal year by the Constitution and other Acts of Parliament. 

The two basic concepts underlying the Government's accounting system are found in the 
Constitution Acts: first, the concept of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, which emanates 
from the requirement that all duties and revenues received, other than those reserved to the 
provinces, "shall form One Consolidated Revenue Fund"; second, the concept that the 
balance of the Fund, after certain prior charges, "shall be appropriated by the Parliament of 
Canada". 

Responsibility for the integrity and objectivity of the financial statements rests with the 
Government. The financial statements are prepared under the joint direction of the President 
of the Treasury Board, the Minister of Finance, and the Receiver General for Canada, in 
compliance with governing legislation. The financial statements are prepared on a modified 
cash basis of accounting. Where there are departures from cash accounting, the information 
included in these financial statements is based on the Government's best estimates and 
judgement, with due consideration given to materiality. Financial information, contained 
elsewhere in this volume, is consistent with that in the financial statements, unless otherwise 
indicated. 

To fulfill its accounting and reporting responsibilities, the Government maintains systems 
of financial management and internal control which give due consideration to costs, benefits 
and risks, and which are designed to provide reasonable assurance that transactions are 
properly authorized, are executed in accordance with prescribed regulations, are authorized 
by Parliament, and are properly recorded so as to maintain accountability of public money 
and safeguard the assets and properties of Canada under Government administration. The 
Receiver General maintains the accounts of Canada, a centralized record of the Govern- 
ment's financial transactions, and obtains additional information as required, from depart- 
ments, agencies and Crown corporations, to meet accounting and reporting requirements. 

The Auditor General of Canada provides an independent opinion on the financial 
statements prepared by the Government. The duties of the Auditor General in that respect 
are set out in Section 6 of the Auditor General Act, S.C. 1976-77, C.34, which states in part 
that the Auditor General "shall express his opinion as to whether they (the financial 
statements) present fairly information in accordance with stated accounting policies of the 
federal government and on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year together with 
any reservations he may have". 



Annually, the financial statements are tabled in Parliament as part of the Public Accounts, 
and are referred to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, which reports to Parliament 
on the results of its examination together with any recommendations it may have with respect 
to the financial statements and accompanying audit report. Representatives of the Govern- 
ment and of the Auditor General attend the Public Accounts Committee review proceedings 
to provide testimony and other information requested by the Committee. These meetings are 
open to the public, and the Committee's report and recommendations to Parliament are 
published in the official report of the House of Commons. 

The financial statements consist of five statements and accompanying notes. The first 
statement is the Statement of Transactions, which shows how the financial requirements were 
met, and the effect of the transactions on the cash balance. The financial transactions are 
classified into the following categories: 

• The first category, budgetary, consists of all the transactions with outside parties which 
enter into the calculation of the annual deficit or surplus of the Government, that is, the 
receipts from tax and non-tax revenue, together with the expenditures authorized by 
Parliament. 



• 



The second category, non-budgetary, consists of transactions in loans, investments and 
advances, in liabilities for the administration of certain public money received or collected 
for special purposes, and in other liabilities. These transactions account for the change in 
the financial claims and obligations of the Government. 

• The third category, foreign exchange, reflects transactions with the Exchange Fund 
Account, the principal objective of which is to aid in the control and protection of the 
external value of the Canadian dollar, together with an accounting of the net position of 
the Government with respect to the International Monetary Fund. Foreign exchange 
transactions include unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies. 

• The fourth category, unmatured debt, represents the extent to which financial require- 
ments have been met through the increase in unmatured debt, that is, the net change in 
amounts owing for marketable bonds, Canada savings bonds. Treasury bills, and certain 
notes and loans payable. Unmatured debt transactions exclude unmatured debt payable in 
foreign currencies. 

The second statement is the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, which gives a more 
detailed accounting of the budgetary transactions summarized in the Statement of 
Transactions. 

The third statement is the Statement of Accumulated Deficit which shows the changes in 
the accumulated deficit for the last two years. 

The fourth statement is the Statement of Assets and Liabilities. This statement differs in 
some ways from the conventional balance sheet of the private sector. Fixed assets, having 
been accounted for as expenditures, are reported at the nominal value of $1, and revenues not 
yet received, such as uncollected taxes, are not recorded as assets. It should be noted, 
therefore, that the difference between net recorded assets and total liabilities is simply the 
aggregate of annual budgetary deficits and surpluses determined in accordance with the 
accounting policies of the Government; this difference should not be taken as the Govern- 
ment's net worth. 

The fifth statement is the Statement of Use of Appropriations, which summarizes by 
department, the use of parliamentary appropriations for budgetary expenditure, and for 
loans, investments and advances. 

Other sections in this volume, together with Volumes II and III of the Public Accounts, are 
designed to provide information supporting the financial statements. 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



2*5 



Statement of Transactions 

for the Year Ended March 31, 1985 

(in millions of dollars) 



1985 

BUDGETARY TRANSACTIONS 

Revenue 

Expenditure 

Deficit 

NON-BUDGETARY TRANSACTIONS 

Loans, investments and advances 

Specified purpose accounts 

Other transactions 

Net source 

Financial requirements (excluding foreign exchange) 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE TRANSACTION S^^^ 

Total financial requirements'" 

UNMATURED DEBT TRANSACTIONS^^^ 

Change in cash 

CASH BALANCE AT END OF YEAR 5,858 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 

Details can be found in other sections of this volume. 

*" Cash requirements (- ). 

<^) Unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies has been included as part of foreign exchange transactions. 

September 16. 1985 



1984 



64.137 
-101.054 


57.131 
-88,915 


-36.917 


-31,784 


510 
4.214 
2.582 


-673 
4.399 
3,105 


7.306 


6,831 


-29.611 

2.233 
- 27.378 

26.824 
-554 


- 24,953 

168 
-24,785 

26.618 
1,833 



6,412 



MICHAEL H. RAYNER, F.C.A. 
Comptroller General of Canada 



STANLEY H. HARTT 
Deputy Minister of Finance 



R. V. HESSION 
Deputy Receiver General for Canada 



2'6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

Statement of Revenue and Expenditure 
for the Year Ended March 31, 1985 

(in millions of dollars) 



1985 



Gross^') 



REVENUE, Table 5.1, Section 5— 
TAX REVENUE 
Income tax — 

Personal 

Corporation 

Non-resident 

Excise taxes and duties — 

Sales tax 

Energy taxes 

Customs import duties 

Other 

Other tax revenue 

NON-TAX REVENUE 

Return on investments 

Other non-tax revenue 

TOTAL REVENUE 

EXPENDITURE, Table 6.2. Section 6— 
Social development — 
Old age security benefits, guaranteed income supplements and spouses' allowances . 

Family allowances 

Canada Assistance Plan 

Government contribution to the Unemployment Insurance Account 

Established programs financing — 

Insurance and medical care services 

Education support 

Other 

Economic and regional development 

Fiscal arrangements 

External affairs and aid 

Defence 

Parliament and services to Government 

Total program expenditure 

Public debt 

PROVISION FOR VALUATION 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 

DEFICIT 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 

Details can be found in other sections of this volume. 

") The difference between Gross and Net is Revenue credited to appropriations. 

September 16. 1985 



Net") 



70,724 64,137 



107,641 101,054 



36,917 36,917 



1984 



Gross*" 



62,842 



31,784 



Net(" 



29,254 


29,254 


26.967 


26.967 


9,379 


9,379 


7,286 


7.286 


1,021 


1,021 


908 


908 


39.654 


39.654 


35.161 


35.161 


7.729 


7,729 


6,660 


6.660 


6,417 


4,209 


5.786 


4.036 


3,796 


3,796 


3,380 


3.380 


2,538 


2,312 


2.319 


2.111 


20.480 


18.046 


18.145 


16.187 


107 


107 


126 


126 


60,241 


57,807 


53,432 


51,474 


5,272 


5,202 


4.825 


4J47 


5.211 


1.128 


4.585 


910 


10.483 


6,330 


9,410 


5,657 



57,131 



11,418 


11,418 


10,406 


10,406 


2,418 


2,418 


2,326 


2,326 


3,635 


3,635 


3,288 


3,288 


2.788 


2,788 


2,714 


2,714 


6,330 


6.330 


5,564 


5,564 


2,492 


2,492 


2,252 


2,252 


14,991 


13,632 


13,598 


12,350 


44.072 


42.713 


40.148 


38.900 


16,972 


13,827 


14.942 


12,327 


6,085 


6,085 


5.878 


5,878 


2.137 


2,117 


1,782 


1.764 


9,197 


8,926 


8,284 


7,972 


5,827 


4,035 


5,146 


3.628 


84.290 


77.703 


76.180 


70.469 


22,551 


22,551 


18,146 


18,146 


106,841 


100,254 


94,326 


88,615 


800 


800 


300 


300 



94,626 88,915 



31,784 



MICHAEL H. RAYNER, F.C.A. 
Comptroller General of Canada 



STANLEY H. HARTT 
Deputy Minister of Finance 



R. V. HESSION 
Deputy Receiver General for Canada 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STA TEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 2 • 7 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

Statement of Accumulated Deficit 
for the Year Ended March 31, 1985 

(in millions of dollars) 

1985 1984 

Accumulated deficit, beginning of year 

As previously reported , 157,01 1 1 19,522 

Reclassification and valuation of certain assets and liabilities (Note 2) ...........?.. - 2,480 3,225 

Accumulated deficit, beginning of year, as restated 154,531 122,747 

Deficit before change in accounting policies (as previously reported for 1984) 37,767 37,489 

Net decrease in deficit due to reclassification and valuation of certain assets and liabilities (Note 2) - 850 - 5,705 

Deficit (as restated for 1984) 36,917 31.784 

Accumulated deficit at end of year (as restated for 1984) 191,448 154,531 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 
Details can be found in other sections of this volume. 

September 16. 1985 

MICHAEL H. RAYNER, F.C.A. STANLEY H. HARTT R. V. HESSION 

Comptroller General of Canada Deputy Minister of Finance Deputy Receiver General for Canada 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

Statement of Assets and Liabilities 
as at March 31, 1985 

(in millions of dollars) 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



1985 



1984 



Net increase 
or decrease ( - ) 



FINANCIAL ASSETS 

LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES, Table 7.1, Section 7— 
Crown corporations^ — ■ 
Lending institutions — 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 40 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation '. 9,860 

Export Development Corporation 890 

Farm Credit Corporation 4,328 

Federal Business Development Bank 557 

15.675 

All other Crown corporations — 

Air Canada 557 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 795 

Canada Development Investment Corporation 396 

Canadian National Railways 2,854 

Petro-Canada 4,299 

Other 1,646 

10.547 

Total Crown corporations 26.222 

Other loans, investments and advances — 

Provincial and territorial governments 1,147 

National governments including developing countries 4,387 

International organizations 3,727 

Less: notes payable 1,196 

2.531 

Veterans' Land Act Fund advances less allowance for conditional benefits 192 

Joint and mixed enterprises 571 

Miscellaneous 766 

9.594 
35,816 

Less: aWov/ance for valuation 6,200 

TOTAL LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 29,616 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS, Table 10.1, Section 1 0— 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances, Table 10.2, Section 10 4,177 

International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 3,985 

8.162 

Less: International Monetary Fund — Notes payable 3,276 

Special Drawing Rights allocations 1,056 

4.332 

TOTAL FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 3.830 

CASH IN TRANSIT, Table 12.1, Section 12 1,882 

CASH,TMe 12.2, Section 12 5.858 

FIXED ASSETS (valued at one dollar). Section 12 

NET RECORDED ASSETS 41,186 

ACCUMULATED DEFICIT i9i.448 

TOTAL 232,634 





40 


10,224 


-364 


929 


-39 


4,500 


-172 


714 


-157 


16.367 


-692 


575 


-18 


833 


-38 


414 


-18 


2,856 


-2 


4,299 




1,618 


28 


10.595 


-48 


26.962 


-740 


1,214 


-67 


4,215 


172 


3,306 


421 


1,153 


43 


2.153 


378 


224 


-32 


460 


111 


598 


168 


8.864 


730 


35,826 


-10 


5,700 


500 


30,126 


-510 


3,399 


778 


3,995 


-10 


7.394 


768 


3,244 


32 


1,058 


-2 


4.302 


30 


3.092 


738 


1.876 


6 


6.412 


-554 



41,506 
154.531 



-320 
36.917 



196,037 



36,597 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



2*9 



1985 1984 

LIABILITIES 

SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUMS, Table 8.1, Section 8— 

Canada Pension Plan Account 

Less: provincial government securities held by the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund 

Superannuation accounts ■*/.... 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiencies 

Unemployment Insurance Account 

Less: interest-bearing loans „...;„. 

Government Annuities Account '. 

Deposit and trust accounts 

Provincial tax collection agreements account 

Other 

TOTAL SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

OTHER LIABILITIES, Table 9.1, Section 9— 

Interest and matured debt 

Less: unamortized discount on Treasury bills 

Accounts payable 

Outstanding cheques and warrants 

Allowance for employee vacation and termination benefits 

Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corporations expected to be repaid by the Government — 

Borrowings of agent Crown corporations. Table 7.4, Section 7 (Note 14) 

Less: borrowings expected to be repaid by these Crown corporations 

Miscellaneous 

TOTAL OTHER LIABILITIES 

UNMATURED DEBT, Tables 1 1 . 1 and 1 1 .9, Section 11 — 
Payable in Canadian currency — 

Marketable bonds 

Canada savings bonds 

Special non-marketable bonds issued to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund 

Treasury bills 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. to be repaid by the Government 

Less: Government's holdings of unmatured debt 

Payable in foreign currencies — 

Marketable bonds 

Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. to be repaid by the Government 

Less: Government's holdings of unmatured debt 

TOTAL UNMATURED DEBT 

TOTAL 232,634 196,037 



Net increase 
or decrease ( - ) 



29.056 


26,612 


2,444 


27,349 


25,116 


2,233 


1.707 


1.496 


211 


37.517 


33.791 


3,726 


527 


1.103 


-576 


36.990 


32.688 


4.302 


-262 


-278 


16 


4.815 


3.823 


992 


- 5.077 


-4.101 


-976 


1,095 


1.124 


-29 


2.611 


2.290 


321 


1,617 


1.308 


309 


574 


498 


76 


39,517 


35.303 


4,214 


10,805 


9.638 


1.167 


1.387 


1.016 


371 


9.418 


8.622 


796 


5.556 


4.307 


1.249 


3.422 


3.046 


376 


2.050 


1,900 


150 


12.864 


10.763 


2.101 


12.810 


10.675 


2.135 


54 


88 


-34 


185 


134 


51 


20,685 


18,097 


2.588 


69,256 


56,811 


12,445 


41,960 


38,204 


3,756 


205 


189 


16 


52,300 


41,700 


10,600 


100 


150 


-50 


163.821 


137.054 


26.767 


446 


503 


-57 


163.375 


136.551 


26.824 


2.117 


2.183 


-66 


5.943 


3,039 


2,904 


1.017 


884 


133 


9.077 


6.106 


2.971 


20 


20 




9.057 


6.086 


2.971 


172,432 


142,637 


29,795 



36,597 



The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 
Details can be found in other sections of this volume. 

September 16. 1985 



MICHAEL H. RAYNER, F.C.A. 
Comptroller General of Canada 



STANLEY H. HARTT 
Deputy Minister of Finance 



R. V. HESSION 
Deputy Receiver General for Canada 



2*10 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

Statement of Use of Appropriations 
for the Year Ended March 31, 1985 

(in millions of dollars) 



Balances 



Agriculture — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Communications — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Consumer and Corporate Affairs — Budgetary 

Economic and Regional Development — Budgetary 

Employment and Immigration — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Energy, Mines and Resources — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Environment — Budgetary 

External Affairs — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Finance — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Fisheries and Oceans — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Governor General — Budgetary 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Justice — Budgetary 

Labour — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

National Defence — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

National Health and Welfare — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

National Revenue — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Parliament — Budgetary 

Privy Council — Budgetary 

Public Works — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Regional Industrial Expansion — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Science and Technology — Budgetary 

Secretary of State — Budgetary 

Social Development — Budgetary 

Solicitor General — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Supply and Services — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Transport — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Treasury Board — Budgetary 

Veterans Affairs — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

TOTAI^BUDGETARY 103,828 

NON-BUDGETARY 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of this statement. 

Details of use of appropriations can be found in Volume II. 

<•) Less than $500,000. 

(2) Previous year's amount was restated due to exclusion of revaluation adjustment 

Amounts in roman type are budgetary. 

Amounts in bold face type are non-budgetary loans, investments and advances. 

September 16. 1985 





Used in 






Used in 




the current 




Carried 


the previous 


Appropriations 


year 


Lapsed 


Ovcrexpended forward 


year 


1,915 


1,593 


298 


24 


1.393 


1,027 


-134 


(1) 


1,161 


194 


1,584 


1,520 


41 


23 


1,369 


81 


-3 


(1) 


84 


(1) 


261 


202 


59 




269 


22 


6 


16 




20 


5,308 


4,994 


314 




4,820 


12 


6 




6 


3 


4,844 


4,575 


198 


71 


3,458 


3,910 


4 


6 


3,900 


625 


855 


819 


36 




762 


2,354 


2,305 


37 


12 


1,972 


11,250 


510 


23 


10,717 


535(2) 


28,593 


28,514 


4 


75 


23,918 


4,983 


249 


(I) 


4,734 


40 


789 


721 


68 




609 


170 


118 


(1) 


52 


37 


6 


6 


(1) 




5 


2,286 


2,251 


29 


3 9 


2,052 


71 


21 


2 


48 


150 


285 


257 


28 


(!) 


219 


2,173 


2.107 


66 




1,719 


4,666 


283 


23 


4,360 


438 


8,938 


8,926 


30 


18 


7,972 


48 


9 




39 


1 


24,935 


24,914 


21 


(1) 


22,554 


20 


20 


(1) 






1.611 


1,588 


23 




1,465 


soo 






500 




196 


194 


2 




178 


176 


174 


2 


(1) 


83 


1,814 


1,433 


90 


291 


1,234 


2 




2 






2,036 


1.666 


273 


97 


2,072 


1,289 


-155 


9 


1,435 


-155 


830 


792 


38 




693 


3.268 


3.224 


35 


9 


2,918 


7 


3 


4 




6 


1,789 


1,630 


159 




1,496 


(1) 


(1) 




(1) 


(I) 


703 


410 


15 


278 


441 


22 


-2 




24 


-2 


4.148 


3,701 


405 


42 


3,265 


962 


-10 


9 


963 


57 


573 


270 


303 




265 


1.529 


1.459 


70 




1,388 


377 


-34 




411 


-34 


103,828 


100,254 


2,664 


21 931 


88,615 


29,390 


882 


74 


28,434 


1,889(2) 



MICHAEL H. RAYNER, F.C.A. 
Comptroller General of Canada 



STANLEY H. HARTT 
Deputy Minister of Finance 



R. V. HESSION 
Deputy Receiver General for Canada 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

Notes to the Financial Statements of the Government of Canada 



2-11 



1. Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies of the Government of Canada are 
based on concepts embodied in the Constitution Acts, and in 
the Financial Administration Act and other legislation. 

i. Government of Canada as an accounting entity 

For purposes of maintaining the accounts of Canada 
and preparing the Public Accounts, the Government of 
Canada is defined as all the departments named in 
Schedule A of the Financial Administration Act; any 
division or branch of the Public Service, including a 
commission appointed under the Inquiries Act, desig- 
nated by the Governor in Council as a department for 
purposes of the Financial Administration Act; the staffs 
of the Senate, the House of Commons, and the Library 
of Parliament; and, any corporation named in Schedule 
B of the Financial Administration Act. 

In accordance with the above definition, the corpora- 
tions listed in Parts I and II of Schedule C of the 
Financial Administration Act, and those Crown corpo- 
rations that are not subject to Divisions I to IV of Part 
XII of the Financial Administration Act, are excluded 
from the Government of Canada as an accounting 
entity; therefore, their financial statements are not 
consolidated with those of the Government. However, 
the borrowings of those corporations which are agents 
of the Crown are recorded as a liability of the Govern- 
ment net of borrowings expected to be repaid directly 
by these corporations. The financial statements of 
Crown corporations are presented in Volume III of the 
Public Accounts. 

In addition, certain accounts and funds have finan- 
cial statements which are not combined with those of 
the Government, but appear separately in Volumes I 
and II. These accounts and funds include the Exchange 
Fund Account, the Canada Pension Plan Account, the 
Unemployment Insurance Account and other similar 
accounts. 

ii. Classification of financial transactions 

The financial transactions of the Government, as 
recorded in the accounts of Canada and reported in the 
Public Accounts, are classified into budgetary, non- 
budgetary, foreign exchange and unmatured debt 
transactions. 

In general terms, budgetary transactions enter into 
the calculation of the annual deficit or surplus and are 
reported on the Statement of Revenue and Expendi- 
ture. All other transactions lead to the acquisition or 
disposal of financial claims or to the creation or dis- 
charge of financial obligations, and are disclosed on the 
Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 

For purposes of reporting, the Public Accounts uses 
the classification in force at the end of the year to 
which the report refers and amounts for the previous 
year are reclassified retroactively to conform to the 
current year's accounting policies and presentation. 



iii. Budgetary revenue 

Budgetary revenue consists of all tax and non-tax 
receipts which affect the annual deficit or surplus of the 
Government, and includes revenue internal to the 
Government. 

The Government generally reports revenue in the 
year in which it is received, with refunds of revenue 
allocated to the year in which they are actually paid. 

Revenue is reported after deducting refunds paid, 
and excludes amounts receivable, taxes collected on 
behalf of provinces and territories, and amounts credit- 
ed to the Canada Pension Plan Account, the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Account, superannuation accounts, 
other specified purpose accounts, and other liability 
accounts. 

On the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, reve- 
nue is reported both gross and net. The difference 
between the two is revenue credited to appropriations. 

iv. Budgetary expenditure 

Budgetary expenditure consists of all charges to 
budgetary appropriations which affect the annual defi- 
cit or surplus of the Government. Such charges include 
those for work performed, goods received, services ren- 
dered, and transfer payments made, during the year, 
and, expenditure internal to the Government. 

Expenditure excludes amounts charged to the 
Canada Pension Plan Account, the Unemployment In- 
surance Account except for the Government's share of 
benefits, superannuation accounts, other specified pur- 
pose accounts, and other liability accounts. 

On the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, ex- 
penditure is reported both gross and net. The difference 
between the two is revenue credited to appropriations. 

v. Assets 

Assets are defined as the financial claims acquired by 
the Government on outside organizations and individu- 
als as a result of events and transactions recorded as at 
the closing date. 

However, as a result of the Government's accounting 
policies described above, certain financial claims are 
not reported on the Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 
The most important of these are accounts receivable, 
net of refunds payable, for tax and non-tax revenue. 

vi. Liabilities 

Liabilities are defined as the financial obligations of 
the Government to outside organizations and individu- 
als as a result of events and transactions recorded as at 
the closing date. 

However, as a result of the Government's accounting 
policies described above, and in accordance with en- 
abling legislation, actuarial liabilities arising from the 



2-12 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



indexing to the cost of living, of superannuate pensions 
and annuities, are not reported on the Statement of 
Assets and Liabilities. 

vii. Fixed assets 

The fixed assets of the Government, which include 
land, engineering structures and works (such as canals, 
harbours and roads), buildings, and machinery and 
equipment, are charged to budgetary expenditure at the 
time of acquisition or construction. Their existence, 
however, is acknowledged on the Statement of Assets 
and Liabilities by reporting them at the nominal value 
of$l. 

viii. Valuation of assets and liabilities 
ASSETS 

Assets are recorded at cost and are subject to annual 
valuation to reflect reductions from the recorded value 
to the estimated realizable value. 

LIABILITIES 

Liabilities are recorded in the amounts ultimately 
payable and liabilities for the superannuation accounts, 
with the exception of indexing, and the Government 
Annuities Account, are valued on an actuarial basis. 

The Canada Pension Plan Account and the Supple- 
mentary Retirement Benefits Account are not main- 
tained on an actuarial basis. The Canada Pension Plan 
Act limits payments from the Consolidated Revenue 
Fund to the balance in the Canada Pension Plan 
Account. 

ix. Translation of foreign currency transactions 

Foreign currency transactions are translated and 
recorded in Canadian currency equivalents at the 
exchange rates prevailing at the transaction dates. 

Assets and liabilities resulting from foreign currency 
transactions are, in turn, reported at year-end closing 
rates of exchange; net gains are credited to revenue, 
while net losses are charged to expenditure. 

2. Change in Accounting Policies 

The receipts of the Canadian Ownership Account have been 
classified as budgetary transactions, whereas in previous years, 
they were classified as non-budgetary transactions. This 
change in accounting policy has been authorized by the Presi- 
dent of the Treasury Board and the Minister of Finance under 
Section 54(2)(b) of the Financial Administration Act. 

In 1984 and prior years, the effect of changes in accounting 
policies was reflected entirely in the year of change, with no 
restatement of prior year's figures. Commencing in 1985, such 
changes are applied retroactively, with restatement of the 
previous year's deficit and accumulated deficit, for consisten- 
cy. 

The effect of the changes made in both 1985 and 1984, on 
the accumulated deficit at the beginning of the year and on the 
deficit for the year, is as follows: 



Effect of changes on the accumulated deficit at the 
beginning of year 

(in millions of dollars) 



1985 



1984 



Change implemented in 1985: 

Inclusion of the Canadian Ownership 
special charge, accumulated to the 
beginning of the year, in revenue^') - 2,480 - 1,675 

Changes implemented in 1984: 
Provision for valuation of certain assets, 
and for liabilities previously not record- 
ed 4,900 

Decrease ( - )/increase in accumulated defi- 
cit at the beginning of the year due to 
changes in accounting policies - 2,480 3,225 



^"The investments, made through the Canadian Ownership Account, are 
now presented under Loans, investments and advances — Petro-Canada. 



ii. Effect of changes on the deficit 



(in millions of dollars) 



1985 



1984 



Change implemented in 1985: 

Inclusion of the Canadian Ownership 
special charge, in revenue 

Changes implemented in 1 984: 
Retroactive effect of provision for valua- 
tion of certain assets, and for liabilities 
previously not recorded 

Decrease in deficit due to changes in 
accounting policies 



850 



805 



4,900 



-850 



5,705 



3. Change in Presentation 

On the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, revenue is 
presented in a more summarized form, while expenditure, 
previously presented by department, is now presented by 
envelope. 

4. Contingent Liabilities of the Government of Canada 

A contingent liability is a potential liability which may 
become an actual liability when one or more future events 
occur or fail to occur. The contingent liabilities of the Govern- 
ment consist of explicit guarantees and potential losses arising 
from pending and threatened litigation relating to claims and 
assessments in respect of breach of contract, damages to 
persons and property, and like items. 

The contingent liabilities of the Government as at March 
31, 1985 amounted to $8,208 million and are summarized in 
the following table: 



(in millions of dollars) 



i) Explicit guarantees by the Government 

Borrowings by other than Crown corporations 

Insurance programs of the Government 

Other explicit guarantees 

ii) Pending and threatened litigation*^' 



I985(" 


1984 


2,866 


2,177 


1,468 


1,428 


150 


125 


3,724 


2,859 



8,208 



6,589 



(i> Details can be found in Section 12 of this volume. 

<^> Includes $2.9 billion related to the administration of native statutory and 
treaty obligations by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern De- 
velopment. This amount represents plaintiffs' claims in 42 litigation cases. 
There are another 64 cases and settlements of Native Land claims currently 
under negotiation, for which amounts are not stated in the claims, and it is 
not possible to determine the amounts that may be ultimately payable. 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



2*I3 



5. Consolidation of Crown Corporations 

In accordance with the accounting policy stated in Note 
l(i), the assets, liabilities, revenues and expenditures reported 
in the separate financial statements of Crown corporations 
named in Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act 
(FA A), and of Crown corporations not subject to Divisions I 
to IV of FAA Part XII, are not consolidated in the Govern- 
ment's financial statements. As a consequence, only the finan- 
cial transactions between the Government and Crown corpora- 
tions, are recorded in the accounts of Canada. 

The following table summarizes total Government assets, 
liabilities, revenues and expenditures on the existing uncon- 
solidated basis, and provides a comparison with what these 
totals would be if the separate financial statements of all 
Crown corporations were fully consolidated with the financial 
statements of the Government. The consolidated totals include 
assets, liabilities, revenues and expenditures of Crown corpora- 
tions resulting from transactions with parties other than the 
Government. The effects of all transactions between the corpo- 
rations and the Government and between the corporations 
themselves have been eliminated from the totals on 
consolidation. 

The consolidated information has been prepared using the 
Government's modified cash basis of accounting, under which 
non-financial assets such as land, buildings and equipment are 
included in expenditure when acquired rather than reported as 
assets. Accordingly, non-financial corporate assets of $26,714 
million have been included in the consolidated accumulated 
deficit rather than shown as assets. 

For corporations with financial year ends other than March 
31, unaudited information is included in the table. 



(in millions of dollars) 



1985 


Govern- 
ment 
as 
reported 


Consoli- 
dated 
with 
Crown cor- 
porations*'* 


41,186 


18.797 
29.714 


41.186 


48,311 



155,549 
16,564 

16.946 

58.661 
14.524 



262,244 



213.733 



90.807 
128.828 



38.021 
175.712 



213,733 



8.693 



Financial assets 

Held by departments 

Held by Crown corporations 

Total financial assets 

Liabilities 

Unmatured debt 

Of departments 172,432 

Of Crown corporations 

Bank of Canada notes in circulation and 
amounts due to depositors 

Other amounts owing 

By departments 60.202 

By Crown corporations 

Total liabilities 232.634 

Accumulated deficit 191.448 

Revenues 70,724 

Expenditures 107,641 

Deficit for the year 36,917 

Accumulated deficit, beginning of year 154.531 

Accumulated deficit, end of year 191.448 

Contingent liabilities 8,208 

0) Details can be found in Section 7 of this volume. 



6. Insurance Programs 

Certain Crown corporations, all of which are agents of Her 
Majesty, operate insurance programs. In the event that such 
corporations do not have sufficient funds to meet their obliga- 
tions, the Government will provide the required financing 
through appropriations, either budgetary or non-budgetary. 
The Government is of the opinion that no allowance need be 
established in the accounts of Canada for these insurance 
programs. 

In the case of the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation, as 
described in Note 14 (ii), the Government will provide the 
required financing through non-budgetary appropriations. 

In the case of the Mortgage Insurance Fund (MIF), the 
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation estimates that the 
deficit calculated on an actuarial basis as at March 31, 1985, 
was $812 million after forgiveness of prior year advances from 
the Government of $308 million. While the MIF is designed to 
be self-sufficient over the long run, it has experienced cash 
deficiencies. Since August 1984, the Government has provided 
interest-free advances to the MIF, through budgetary appro- 
priations. Advances treated as budgetary expenditure in 1984- 
85 were $172 million, reducing the $812 million to $640 
million. A further $60 million has been advanced to September 
15, 1985. 



2'14 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



The following table summarizes information regarding such 
insurance programs. The information has not been audited 
because the corporations have financial year ends other than 
March 31, 1985. 

(in millions of dollars) 

5 year Amount 
average of 

Insurance Net of net fund or 

Programs in force claims* claims provision 

Canada Deposit Insurance Cor- 
poration 

Current year 172,615 245 54 -872 

Previous year 161,547 22 4 -328 

Canada Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation 
Mortgage insurance fund 

Current year 39,500 161 18 -640 

Previous year 34,474 -50 -6 -226 

Home improvement loan in- 
surance fund 

Current year 2 <" <■> 8 

Previous year 3 <•> <•> 7 

Rental guarantee fund 

Current year 27 

Previous year 30 

Export Development Corpora- 
tion 
Export insurance contracts 
entered into on its own 
behalf 

Current year 2,309 4 7 24 

Previous year 2,132 19 7 22 

Financial statements of these corporations are reproduced in Volume III of 

the Public Accounts. 
* Refers to the difference between claims and amounts received from sales of 

related assets and other recoveries. 
<" Less than $500,000. 



7. International Development Assistance 
Subscriptions 

i. Loans to developing countries 



-Loans and 



Included in loans to National governments of $4,387 
million ($4,215 million in 1984) are loans to developing 
countries of $3,080 million ($2,879 million in 1984). 
These loans are part of Canada's international develop- 
ment assistance program and are either interest-free or 
bear interest at rates that were more favourable than 
those prevailing in Canada at the time the assistance 
was provided. The balances outstanding at March 31, 
grouped by term, are: 



Term 



Grace period 
before 
repayment Interest 

commences rate 



(in millions of dollars) 



1985 



1984 



1 7 years 
20 years 
25 years 
30 years 
35 years 
40 years 
50 years 
53 years'') 
55 years'" 



7 years 
5 years 
5 years 
7 years 
5 years 
10 years 
10 years 
13 years 
1 5 years 



5% 
6% 
3% 



1 

35 

1 

189 

3 

1 

2,805 

41 

4 



1 

35 

1 

189 

3 

1 

2,649 



3,080 



2,879 



• Interest-free. 

'" Rescheduled loans. 

These loans, by their terms, confer financial benefits 
on the recipients. Discounted at the long-term borrow- 



ing rate for the year of the transaction, the present 
value of benefits conferred has been estimated at 
$2,200 million ($2,100 million in 1984). The benefits 
conferred during the year were $100 million ($200 
million in 1984). In accordance with Note 1 (viii), no 
provision was made for this amount in the accounts of 
Canada. 

During the year, loan interest and commitment/ser- 
vice charges of $6 million ($6 million in 1984) was 
received from developing countries. Details can be 
found in Sections 7 and 14 of this volume and in 
Section 8 of Volume II. 

ii. Subscriptions and loans to international organiza- 
tions 

Included in Loans, investments and advances — Inter- 
national organizations of $3,727 million ($3,306 million 
in 1984) are subscriptions to the capital of the Interna- 
tional Development Association and loans to other 
international financial institutions of $3,086 million 
($2,754 million in 1984) which are also part of Cana- 
da's development assistance program. These institutions 
make loans to developing countries on terms similar to 
those described in sub-section i. Subscriptions to inter- 
national organizations do not provide a return on 
investment but are repayable on termination of the 
organization or on withdrawal therefrom. Details can 
be found in Section 7 of this volume. 

Loans, investments and advances — International 
organizations are presented net after deduction of notes 
payable of $1,196 million ($1,153 million in 1984), 
including $1,129 million ($1,076 million in 1984) of 
notes payable to the aforementioned Association and 
institutions. The notes are non-interest bearing, are 
non-negotiable, but are payable on demand, although 
they are normally encashed over periods of up to seven 
years, according to the financial requirements of the 
institutions. 

Included in the Allowance for valuation is an amount 
of $1,957 million ($1,678 million in 1984) equal to the 
net position of the Government vis-a-vis these 
institutions. 

8. Superannuation Accounts 

The Government provides pensions for its employees, princi- 
pally members of the Public Service, the Canadian Forces, and 
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Basic pensions 
are provided for these employees under authority of the Public 
Service Superannuation Act, the Canadian Forces Superannu- 
ation Act and the RCMP Superannuation Act, respectively. 
The basic pensions are indexed to the cost of living under 
authority of the Supplementary Retirement Benefits Act. 

The Public Service Superannuation Act also covers the 
employees of certain Crown corporations. Employees of these 
participating Crown corporations make contributions on the 
same basis as Government employees, and the corporations 
contribute an equal amount. 

The superannuation accounts shown on the Statement of 
Assets and Liabilities include liabilities for basic pensions and 
for indexing. Liabilities for basic pensions are determined on 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



2-15 



an actuarial basis and liabilities for indexing are not. The 
Government has estimated that if the liabilities for all super- 
annuation accounts were determined on an actuarial basis, the 
reported liabilities and accumulated deficit would increase by 
$15.8 billion as at March 31, 1985 ($16.2 billion as at March 
31, 1984). 

This estimate is based on long-term economic assumptions 
including an assumed interest rate of 6.5%, inflation rate of 
3.0%, wage increase rate of 5.5%, and other actuarial assump- 
tions and methods that were used for purposes of actuarial 
reports for basic pensions tabled prior to March 31, 1985. 
However, the estimated unrecorded actuarial liability would 
be substantially lower if it were assumed that "real" interest 
earnings credited to the accounts, which are currently substan- 
tially higher than implicit in the assumptions used, would 
continue at a relatively high level for a number of years. 

It should be noted that the financing, accounting and fund- 
ing of employee pension plans are currently being reviewed in 
anticipation of legislative changes. 

9. Specified Purpose and Exchange Fund Accounts 

In accordance with the stated accounting policies of the 
Government, the revenues and expenditures of the following 
accounts are not included in the revenues and expenditures of 
the Government. The balances of those accounts are reported 
on the Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Government. 
Had the transactions of the following accounts been classified 
as budgetary, revenue, expenditure, the deficit and the 
accumulated deficit would have been affected as follows: 







(in millions of dollars) 








Effect on 










Accumu- 






Expendi- 


lated 




Revenue 


ture Deficit 


deficit 


Unemployment Insurance 








Account^" 


7,779 


8,755 976 


5,077 




7.466 


7.925 459 


4.101 


Other specified purpose 








accounts 


541 


503 - 38 


-980 




389 


141 - 248 


-942 


Exchange Fund Account^" 


-190 


190 


-34 




-246 


246 


-224 


Total effect ..'.i!'....''^"' 


'' 8,130 
7.609 


9,258 1,128 
8.066 457 


4,063 




2.935 



'" Details of these accounts can be found in Sections 8 and 10 of this volume. 
Amounts in roman type are 1984-85 figures. 
Amounts in italic type are 1983-84 figures. 

10. Canada Pension Plan Account 

Under existing legislation, benefits and costs incurred in the 
administration of the Canada Pension Plan are financed from 
contributions from employees, employers and self-employed 
persons, and from interest from the investment of contribu- 
tions not immediately needed for benefits and costs. Although 
the Canada Pension Plan was established under federal legisla- 
tion, its administration is under the joint control of the Gov- 
ernment and the provinces. Any province or group of provinces 
having Vi of the population of Canada can veto any amend- 
ment to the Canada Pension Plan Act that affects the level of 
contributions or benefits. The Government's authority to pay 
benefits under the Plan is limited to the balance in the Canada 
Pension Plan Account which was $29,056 million at March 31, 
1985. Therefore, in accordance with the accounting policies of 



the Government, the revenues and expenditures of the Plan 
have not been reported with those of the Government. 

In 1985, revenues of the Canada Pension Plan were $6.8 
billion ($6.3 billion in 1984) and expenditures were $4.3 
billion ($3.7 billion in 1984). The balance of the Canada 
Pension Plan Account is $29.1 billion at March 31, 1985 
($26.6 billion at March 31, 1984). Funds in excess of estimat- 
ed current operating requirements ($27.3 billion at March 31, 
1985; $25.1 billion at March 31, 1984) have been invested in 
securities of the provinces and of the Government on the basis 
of contributions from the jurisdiction to total contributions to 
the Plan. 

The Canada Pension Plan is not designed to be accounted 
for on an actuarial basis, but if it were to be accounted for as 
such, the Government estimates that an additional amount of 
$215 billion would have been required at December 31, 1984, 
to pay the future benefits of all contributors and pensioners in 
the Plan at that time. Actuarial assumptions used in making 
this estimate include an interest rate of 6.5%, an inflation rate 
of 3.5%, and an annual increase in average earnings of 5%. 
The financial statements of the Account are reproduced in 
Section 8 of this volume. 

11. Maturity of Government Debt 

The following table presents total unmatured debt arranged 
in order of maturity: 

(in millions of dollars) 

Notes 

and Borrowings 
loans of 

payable Canadair 
in Financial 
Market- Canada foreign Corpora- 
able savings Treasury curren- tion 

bonds'" bonds'" bills cies Inc Total 

1986 5,399 3,621 52,300 1,909 1,117 64.346 

1987 6,643 2,421 211 9,275 

1988 6,640 1,362 1,182 9,184 

1989 1,988 7,756 852 10,596 

1990 5,764 6,943 840 13,547 

1991/95 17,904 19,857 759 38.520 

1996/2000 5,359 190 5.549 

2001/05 16,576 16.576 

2006/09 5,100 5,100 

71,373 41,960 52,300 5.943 1,117 172,693 

Less: Govern- 
ment's own 
holdings 62 199 261_ 

71,311 41,761 52,300 5,943 1,117 172,432 

Details can be found in Section 1 1 of this volume. 
(" It should be noted that all Canada savings bonds are redeemable on demand 
regardless of maturity date and that $4,973 million of marketable bonds 
reported as maturing in 1986 to 1988 are exchangeable at the option of the 
holder for bonds maturing in 1991/94. 

12. Accumulated Deficit 

In accordance with its stated accounting policies, revenues 
of the Canadian Ownership Account are included in the 
revenue of the Government. 

However, enabling legislation requires that such revenue be 
earmarked to be used solely to increase public ownership of the 
oil and gas industry in Canada. The table below presents the 
balances of the Account as at March 31, 1985, included in the 
accumulated deficit: 



2*16 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



(in millions of dollars) 

1985 1984 

Accumulated deficit excluding Canadian Own- 
ership Account 194,778 157,01 1 

Canadian Ownership Account - 3,330 - 2,480 

Accumulated deficit as per Statement of Assets 

and Liabilities 191,448 154,531 



13. Child Tax Credit 

Entitlements to the child tax credit are claimed on personal 
income tax returns. Claims are settled either by reducing the 
tax liability for the year or, if no liability exists, by issuing a 
"refund" cheque. In either case, personal income tax revenues 
are reduced, even where no tax had been paid. Had these tax 
reductions and direct payments been reported as expenditures, 
gross total expenditure and revenue would have increased 
respectively by $1,609 million ($2,1 17 million in 1984). 

14. Borrowings of Agent Crown Corporations 

Included in Borrowings of agent Crown corporations of 
$12.9 billion ($10.8 billion in 1984) are the borrowings of the 
Canadian Wheat Board (CWB) of $4 billion ($2.8 billion in 
1984) and the borrowings of the Canada Deposit Insurance 
Corporation (CDIC) of $1 billion ($0.9 billion in 1984). 

i. Canadian Wheat Board 

The borrowings of the CWB have been incurred to 
finance credit grain sales to various countries. Terms of 
the credit grain sales call for payment in full within 36 
months or less from time of shipment. However, certain 
countries are experiencing difficulties in servicing their 
international financial obligations, of which approxi- 
mately $2.5 billion are owing to CWB. This amount, 
which includes accrued interest, was in arrears. 

These countries have entered into an orderly 
rescheduling of their obligations, including interest at 
current rates. Of the $2.5 billion owed to CWB, 
approximately $0.5 billion has, to September 15, 1985, 
been rescheduled. The rescheduling calls for payments 
over 8 to 10 years; the interest in arrears, together with 
interest on the full amount rescheduled, is paid in the 
initial years, with payments of principal and interest in 
the remaining period. It is anticipated that the remain- 
ing amount in arrears of approximately $2 billion will 
be rescheduled in the near future. 

It should be noted that, for such loans to sovereign 
borrowers, payment delays are not necessarily indica- 
tive of a future loss requiring an allowance. Sovereign 
entities and their international financial obligations do 
not have commercial mortality and the international 
system provides several mechanisms and institutions 
through which countries facing repayment difficulties 
can effect remedial measures in agreement with their 



creditors. Therefore, the Government, as guarantor of 
CWB's borrowings to finance credit grain sales, has 
made no valuation allowance in the accounts of 
Canada. 

ii. Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

The borrowings of CDIC have been incurred to 
finance a deficit, at March 31, 1985, of $872 million as 
a result of a provision for actual and expected losses 
due to insolvent member institutions. CDIC provides 
depositors with insurance of up to $60,000 per depositor 
per member institution on Canadian deposits with a 
term not exceeding 5 years, for which the member 
institutions pay insurance premiums. Subsequent to 
March 31, 1985, as described in Note 17, four member 
institutions, with insured deposits of approximately 
$800 million, were forced to commence wind-up 
procedures. 

In accordance with the CDIC Act, CDIC is author- 
ized to borrow up to $1.5 billion from the Government 
against which it had borrowed $40 million as at March 
31, 1985 and $525 million as at September 15, 1985. 
These borrowings bear interest at current rates to 
Crown corporations and are fully repayable to the 
Government. The Government plans to amend the 
CDIC Act to increase allowable premiums to a level 
sufficient to allow CDIC in the long run to repay its 
borrowings and to eliminate its deficit. The Govern- 
ment is of the opinion that no allowance need be 
established in the accounts of Canada. 



15. Commitments under Capital Lease Arrangements 

Major capital assets of the Government are either purchased 
outright or leased. Where a lease transfers substantially all of 
the benefits and risks incidental to ownership of the property 
to the lessee, it is considered a capital lease. The Government 
has entered into capital leases with outside parties for build- 
ings and equipment. 

In accordance with the accounting policies of the Govern- 
ment, lease payments under capital leases are charged to 
budgetary expenditure in the year of payment. Such payments 
are authorized annually by Parliament. The Government's 
total remaining commitments under capital lease arrange- 
ments, in excess of $ 1 million each, entered into as at March 
31, 1985, amounted to $1,635 million. Included in this amount 
is $1,175 million in imputed interest and $5 million in executo- 
ry costs. The resulting net commitments of $455 million 
represent the value of the capital assets leased and the princi- 
pal amount of the liability therefore, which, in accordance 
with the significant accounting policies of the Government, is 
not reflected as an asset and liability on the Government's 
Statement of Assets and Liabilities. 



AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 



I'M 



(in millions of dollar s) 
1985 



Scheduled minimum lease payments to be made 
in: 

1986 

1987 

1988 

1989 

1990 

1991/95 

1996/2000 

2001/05 

2006/10 

2011/15 

2016/20 

Total commitments under capital lease arrange- 
ments (minimum lease payments) 

Less: imputed interest 

executory costs 

Net commitments under capital lease arrange- 
ments 

Details can be found in Section 14 of this volume. 



16. Transactions Internal to the Government 

In accordance with the accounting policies of the Govern- 
ment, revenue and expenditure include transactions between 
departments. These internal transactions represent valid 
charges and credits to appropriations, and valid credits to 
revenue, since they have been authorized by Parliament. 

The following table summarizes Revenue and Expenditure, 
and related internal transactions. 



55 
55 
55 
55 

55 
267 
248 
248 
247 
229 
121 

1,635 
1,175 
5_ 

455 







(in millions of dollars 






Gross 


Credited 
to appro- 
priations 


Net 


Revenue, as reported 

Less: internal transactions 


62.842 
2.141 
1.738 


6,587 
5.711 
1,931 
1.579 


64,137 

57.131 

210 

159 


Revenue, excluding internal 
transactions 


68,583 
61.104 


4,656 
4.132 


63,927 
56.972 


Expenditure, as reported 

Less: internal transactions 


106,841 

94.326 

2,141 

1.738 


6,587 
5.711 
1,931 
1.579 


100,254 

88.615 

210 

159 


Expenditure, excluding internal 
transactions 


104,700 
92.588 


4,656 
4.132 


100,044 
88.456 











17. Events Subsequent to the End of the Year 

Subsequent to the fiscal year end, the Canadian Commer- 
cial Bank, the Northland Bank, the CCB Mortgage Invest- 
ment Corporation and the Continental Trust Company 
experienced financial difficulties and were forced to commence 
wind-up procedures. The Canada Deposit Insurance Corpora- 
tion (CDIC), which is an agent of Her Majesty, provides 
depositors with insurance of up to $60,000 per depositor per 
member institution on Canadian deposits with a term not 
exceeding 5 years. Such deposits covered by this insurance in 
the four institutions amount to approximately $800 million. In 
addition, the Bank of Canada has advanced approximately 
$1.8 billion, secured by assignment of specific assets of the two 
banks — Canadian Commercial Bank and Northland Bank. 

The Government has tabled draft legislation seeking author- 
ity in the amount of $875 million to compensate all uninsured 
depositors of the two banks and the CCB Mortgage Invest- 
ment Corporation. If the legislation is enacted, payments to 
uninsured depositors by the Government will be made to the 
extent of 60% of the uninsured deposits in 1985-86, the 
remainder being paid in 1986-87. The total amount will be 
charged to budgetary expenditure in 1985-86. 

The Bank of Canada advances are expected to be fully 
reimbursed by virtue of its position as a secured creditor. 
Payments to insured depositors by CDIC, to uninsured deposi- 
tors by the Government, and any loss on the reimbursement of 
the Bank of Canada advances, are potentially recoverable on a 
prorated basis from the sale of the assets of the banks. At this 
time, the amounts ultimately recoverable, if any, cannot be 
determined. 



Details can be found in Sections 5 and 6 of this volume. 
Amounts in roman type are 1984-85 figures. 
Amounts in italic type are 1983-84 figures. 



2*18 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 




OPINION OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL 

ON THE 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 

I have examined the statement of assets and liabilities of the Government of Canada as at 
March 31, 1985 and the statements of revenue and expenditure, transactions, accumulated 
deficit and use of appropriations for the year then ended. My examination was made in 
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included such tests 
and other procedures as I considered necessary to enable me to report as required by Section 
6 of the Auditor General Act. 

In my opinion, these financial statements present information in accordance with the stated 
accounting policies of the Government of Canada as set out in Note 1 to the financial 
statements and, after giving retroactive effect to the change in accounting for Canadian 
Ownership Account transactions as described in Note 2, on a basis consistent with the 
preceding year. However, in my opinion, because of the stated accounting policies that I 
consider inappropriate as outlined in Reservations 1, 2 and 3, the accompanying financial 
statements do not present fairly the financial position of the Government as at March 3 1 , 
1985 and its results of operations and financial requirements for the year then ended. 

Reservation 1: Fragmented Reporting of Government Activities 

Although the financial statements are entitled "The Financial Statements of the Govern- 
ment of Canada", certain significant activities of the Government are excluded, as described 
in Note l(i). As a result, the financial statements do not provide a comprehensive and 
complete summary of the full nature and extent of the financial affairs and resources for 
which the Government is responsible. In my view, the accounting entity as defined in Note 
l(i) is inadequate in the following two respects: 

(i) Significant departmental activities carried out by the Exchange Fund Account, the 
Unemployment Insurance Account and other similar accounts continue to be report- 
ed in separate financial statements or accounts that are not consolidated in the 
Government's financial statements. I believe that they should be. As set out in Note 
9, full consolidation of these activities would have the following effects: 

(in millions of dollars) 



Increase: 

Revenue 

Expenditure 

Deficit 

Accumulated deficit . 



1985 


1984 


8,130 
9,258 
1,128 
4,063 


7,609 
8,066 

457 
2,935 



A UDITED FINANCIAL STA TEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 2 • 1 9 

(ii) The assets, liabilities, revenues and expenditures reported in the separate financial 
statements of Crown corporations are not consolidated in the accompanying finan- 
cial statements. For example, as summarized in Note 14, losses incurred by the 
Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation are not included in the Government's 
reported results of operations. Similarly, the assets and liabilities of the Canadian 
Wheat Board, which include receivables in arrears from sovereign nations for which 
no allowance is currently provided, are not included in the Government's reported 
assets and liabilities. 

If all the separate financial statements of Crown corporations had been consolidated 
using the Government's modified cash basis of accounting, under which non-finan- 
cial assets such as land, buildings and equipment are included in expenditure when 
acquired rather than reported as assets, the effect on the accompanying financial 
statements would be as set out in Note 5. However, further study by the Govern- 
ment is required to determine the extent to which and how the separate financial 
statements of Crown corporations should be consolidated with those of the Govern- 
ment, and the alternative presentation that would be appropriate for any not 
consolidated. Accordingly, I am unable to determine the effect of this matter on the 
Government's financial statements. 

Reservation 2: Assets Reported at Amounts in Excess of Their Value 

When the international development assistance loans identified in Note 7 (i) to the 
financial statements are issued, they are recorded as assets at the full amounts advanced in 
accordance with Note l(v) and (viii). At the date of issue, the amounts advanced by Canada 
considerably exceed the asset value received by Canada because of the concessionary terms 
described in Note 7 (i). In my view, any excess of amounts advanced over asset value received 
confers a benefit and constitutes expenditure, which should be recorded and reported as such 
on the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure in the year the loans are issued. 

The Government has provided no allowance in respect of the $3,080 million of "loans to 
developing countries" described in Note 7(i). I believe that an allowance of approximately 
$2,200 million, the amount of the conferred benefits disclosed in the note, should have been 
provided. 

If these loans had been provided for in the current and prior years, reported assets would 
be decreased and accumulated deficit increased by approximately $2.2 billion ($2. 1 billion in 
1984). The deficit for the year would be increased by approximately $100 million ($200 
million in 1984). 

Reservation 3: Unrecorded Liabilities 

In accordance with the accounting policy stated in Note l(vi), financial obligations in 
respect of indexing employee pensions are not fully recorded and reported in the accompan- 
ying financial statements. I believe that additional financial obligations for indexing should 
be recorded and reported in the financial statements to provide a more complete disclosure of 
liabilities. As disclosed in Note 8, if the full amount of such obligations had been recorded, 
reported liabilities would be increased by approximately $15.8 billion ($16.2 billion in 1984) 
and the deficit for the year would be decreased by up to $400 million (increased by up to $2.3 
billion in 1984). 

Further, as disclosed in Note 6, the Government has not provided for the deficit in the 
Mortgage Insurance Fund. If provision had been made for this deficit, as I believe it should 
have been, reported liabilities would be increased by $640 million ($226 million in 1984) and 
the deficit for the year would be increased by $414 million ($226 million in 1984). 

Additional information and comments on the financial statements and this opinion are 
included in my observations in Section 3 of this volume. 

Ottawa, Canada KENNETH M. DYE, F.C.A. 

September 16, 1985 Auditor General of Canada 



SECTION 3 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Observations by the Auditor 

General on the 

Financial Statements 

of the Government of Canada 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Introduction 3.2 

Reservation 1: Fragmented reporting of government activities .. 3.2 
Reservation 2: Assets reported at amounts in excess of their 

value 3.4 

Reservation 3: Unrecorded liabilities 3.4 

Reporting of summary fmancial information 3.5 



3*2 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

Observations by the Auditor General 

on the 

Financial Statements of the Government of Canada 

Introduction 

I have examined the financial statements of the Government of Canada for the year ended 
March 31, 1985 which, together with my Opinion, are included in Section 2 of this volume. 
These financial statements are the Statement of Assets and Liabilities, the Statement of 
Revenue and Expenditure, the Statement of Transactions, the Statement of Accumulated 
Deficit, and the Statement of Use of Appropriations. 

My examination was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and 
accordingly included such tests and other procedures as I considered necessary to enable me 
to report as required by Section 6 of the Auditor General Act. This section provides that: 

"The Auditor General shall examine the several financial statements required by 
section 55 of the Financial Administration Act to be included in the Public 
Accounts, and any other statement that the President of the Treasury Board or the 
Minister of Finance may present for audit and shall express his opinion as to 
whether they present fairly information in accordance with stated accounting 
policies of the federal government and on a basis consistent with that of the 
preceding year together with any reservations he may have." (italics added) 

The word fairly is used to express the auditor's judgement as to the appropriateness of the 
selection and application of accounting principles to the particular circumstances of an 
enterprise. Because of the significant and pervasive effect on the financial statements of the 
matters reported in my Reservations, I have concluded that: 

". . .the accompanying financial statements do not present fairly the financial 
position of the Government as at March 31, 1985 and its results of operations and 
financial requirements for the year then ended." (italics added) 

The three Reservations in my Opinion concern the appropriateness of the Government's 
stated accounting policies. They address the same issues reported last year. I have illustrated 
my concern with the fragmented reporting issue (Reservation 1) by commenting on the 
Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation and the Canadian Wheat Board. In addition, I have 
included the deficit of the Mortgage Insurance Fund as a further unrecorded liability 
(Reservation 3). The Government has taken some action this year in respect of Reservation 1 
that I will also comment on. 

The Observations that follow provide additional explanatory information on these three 
Reservations and comment on the reporting of summary financial information by the 
Government. 



Reservation 1: Fragmented Reporting of Government Activities 

Under the stated accounting policy described in Note l(i), significant assets, liabilities, 
revenues and expenditures of the Government of Canada are reported in separate financial 
statements of various accounts, funds and Crown corporations that are not now consolidated 
in the financial statements of the Government. Therefore, although the financial statements 
contained in Section 2 of this volume are entitled "The Financial Statements of the 
Government of Canada", they do not provide a comprehensive and complete summary of the 
full nature and extent of the financial affairs and resources for which the Government is 
responsible. 

There are two primary components in Reservation 1. The first deals with excluded 
departmental activities, and the second with excluded government activities carried out by 
Crown corporations. 



OBSERVATIONS BY THE AUDITOR GENERAL ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 3*3 

Excluded departmental activities 

Transactions in respect of the following departmental activities are reported in financial 
statements or accounts that are not consolidated in the financial statements of the 
Government: 

• Unemployment Insurance Account; 

• Exchange Fund Account; and 

• Other specified purpose accounts. 

The Government has summarized in Note 9 what reported revenue, expenditure, deficit 
and accumulated deficit would have been had the above-named activities been consolidated 
this year. I believe that these activities should be consolidated to provide a more comprehen- 
sive and complete summary of the full nature and extent of the financial affairs and resources 
for which the Government is responsible. 

During the current year, the Government consolidated transactions of the Canadian 
Ownership Account. As disclosed in Note 2, this had the effect of reducing the accumulated 
deficit at the beginning of the year by $2,480 million and reducing the deficit of the year by 
$850 million. It also had the effect of eliminating the Canadian Ownership liability account 
of $1,673 million and increasing the investment in Petro-Canada by $1,657 million. 

Excluded activities of Crown corporations 

In addition to the departmental activities discussed above. Government activities are also 
carried out by Crown corporations whose financial statements are not consolidated in the 
financial statements of the Government. At March 31, 1985, investments in Crown corpora- 
tions amounted to approximately $26 billion, or 55 per cent of the Government's recorded 
assets. 

Additional information about Crown corporations has been provided this year in Note 5 to 
the Government's financial statements. This new note summarizes what the Government's 
financial statement totals would be if all Crown corporations were fully consolidated using 
the Government's modified cash basis of accounting, under which non-financial assets such as 
land, buildings and equipment are included in expenditure when acquired rather than 
reported as assets. Section 7 of this volume provides related information by corporation. 

Although Note 5 and Section 7 are informative, the Government has not yet addressed the 
basic issue of how best to adjust its financial statements to reflect activities carried out by 
Crown corporations. 

The exclusion of corporate activities from the financial statements can have a significant 
effect on the information reported in the statements. Consider the Canada Deposit Insurance 
Corporation and the Canadian Wheat Board whose financial affairs are summarized in Note 
14. 

At March 31, 1985, the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation had a deficit of $872 
million. Of this amount, approximately $540 million represents a loss during the year which, 
because the Corporation is not consolidated, is excluded from the Government's reported 
deficit. 

At March 31, 1985, the Canadian Wheat Board had bank borrowings guaranteed by the 
Government of approximately $4.0 billion offset by accounts receivable from sovereign 
nations. Approximately $2.5 billion of the receivables were in arrears, and no allowance is 
currently provided for them. The Board's bank borrowings have, in recent years, been 
increasing annually to pay interest on its debt. The Board is not consolidated, and its 
receivables and borrowings are excluded from the Government's reported assets and 
liabilities. 

Government officials have advised me that they are planning to conduct a study to 
determine which corporations to consolidate, the accounting basis to use for the consolida- 
tion, and the accounting for and disclosure of any corporations not consolidated. I encourage 
the officials to conduct this study and adjust the financial statements on a priority basis. 



3'4 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

A related concern — Expenditures offset against revenues 

Last year, I called attention to the Government's practice of reporting payments under the 
Child Tax Credit program as a reduction in personal income tax revenue rather than as a 
program expenditure. This practice continues, but the Government has added Note 1 3 to the 
financial statements which sets out payments made during the year together with the effect 
on reported revenue and expenditure if the payments had been charged to expenditure of the 
Social Affairs envelope, as I believe they should have been. I have not included this matter in 
Reservation 1 because it has no effect on the reported deficit. 

Reservation 2: Assets Reported at Amounts in Excess of Their Value 

In accordance with the stated accounting policies set out in Note l(v) and (viii) to the 
financial statements, the full amounts of special assistance loans to developing countries are 
recorded as assets. At the date of issue, the amounts advanced by Canada considerably 
exceed the asset value received by Canada because of the concessionary terms described in 
Note 7(i). In my view, any excess of amounts advanced over asset value received confers a 
financial benefit on developing countries and constitutes expenditure in respect of interna- 
tional development assistance that should be recorded and reported as such on the Statement 
of Revenue and Expenditure. 

In saying this, I am not suggesting that all such loans should be revalued at the end of each 
year, as one might do to reflect the impact of inflation. What I am saying is that at the date 
the loans are issued, the Government should determine what they are worth and record them 
as assets at that value at that time. It seems to me that the difference between the amount 
advanced and the asset value received is really a gift or, using government terminology, a 
"grant" that should be charged to expenditure and included in the deficit. 

Although the $3,080 million of special assistance loans outstanding at year end have little 
or no rate of return and are repayable over periods of up to 55 years, the Government has 
provided no valuation allowance for them. I believe that the Government should have 
provided an allowance of approximately $2,200 million — the amount of benefits conferred 
by the loans as disclosed in Note 7(i). Because the loans continue to be shown on the 
Statement of Assets and Liabilities at amounts considerably in excess of their worth as assets, 
my Reservation remains. 

Reservation 3: Unrecorded Liabilities 

Indexing of employee pensions 

The Government has defined liabilities as financial obligations to outside organizations and 
individuals as a result of events and transactions recorded as at the closing date. However, in 
accordance with the accounting policy stated in Note l(vi) and as described in Note 8, 
financial obligations amounting to $15.8 billion ($16.2 billion in 1984), related to indexing 
provisions of employee pension plans (including the Canadian Forces and the Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police), have not been recorded. 

Although Note 8 is informative, until the Government appropriately adjusts the financial 
statements to reflect an additional liability for indexing, the burden is on the reader to do so. 
I consider this both unfair and undesirable. A reader unfamiliar with financial statements 
may get quite a different picture than a reader with more experience in this area. 

Government officials have advised me that they have initiated a study to determine the 
extent to which additional liabilities for indexing employee pensions should be recorded and 
reported in the Government's financial statements and the manner in which to record and 
report the change in such liabilities from one year to the next. I encourage the officials to 
complete this study and adjust the financial statements at the earliest possible date. 

Deficit of Mortgage Insurance Fund 

The Mortgage Insurance Fund is administered by the Canada Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation (CMHC), an agent Crown corporation, on behalf of the Government. The Fund 



OBSERVATIONS BY THE AUDITOR GENERAL ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA 3*5 

was created to facilitate an adequate supply of mortgage funds by reducing the risk to lenders 
and encouraging the secondary market trading of mortgages. If assets of the Fund are not 
sufficient to meet claims against it, the Government advances money to CMHC to permit the 
Corporation to discharge its obligations on behalf of the Fund. 

The Fund has reported increasing deficits over the past several years. After giving 
retroactive effect to forgiveness by the Government in 1985 of loans made to the Fund in 
prior years, the deficits as adjusted at March 31 are as summarized below. 





($ 


millions) 




1985 




1984 


1983 


812 

(172) 




534 
(308) 


270 
(308) 


640 




226 


(38) 



Deficit as reported by the Fund 

Advances from the Government during the 

year 

Retroactive effect of forgiveness of loans 

Deficit (surplus) as adjusted 



As explained in Note 6 to the financial statements, the Government believes that no 
allowance need be established in the accounts of Canada for the deficit of the Fund. I 
disagree. In my judgement, the deficits (as adjusted in the above table) are actual liabilities 
of the Government that should be recorded in the accounts and included in the financial 
statements because: 

• they represent a qualified actuary's best estimate of amounts payable in the future in 
respect of losses incurred from insurance in force; and 

• funds are unlikely to be available in the future from other than the Government to cover 
these losses. 

If an allowance had been established in the accounts of Canada for the deficit of the 
Mortgage Insurance Fund, as I believe it should have been, reported liabilities of the 
Government would be increased by $640 million ($226 million in 1984) and the deficit for 
the year would be increased by $414 million ($226 million in 1984). 



Reporting of Summary Financial Information 

I continue to believe that the most significant and pervasive problem in financial reporting 
by the federal government is the use of inappropriate accounting principles in preparing its 
financial reports. Again this year I have three Reservations which, in my opinion, show that 
inappropriate accounting policies have resulted in fragmented reporting of Government 
activities, assets reported at amounts in excess of their value and significant unrecorded 
liabilities. 

I believe strongly that understanding users' activities and financial information needs is the 
starting point for building consensus about the accounting principles that should be used in 
preparing the Government's financial reports. This view is consistent with a recent statement 
of the Public Sector Accounting and Auditing Committee of the Canadian Institute of 
Chartered Accountants (CICA) which identified the primary objective of government 
financial statements as the communication of "... reliable information relevant to the needs of 
those for whom the statements are prepared in a manner that maximizes its usefulness ...". 

I have recently completed an intensive two-year study of users' needs for financial 
information about the Government, the Federal Government Reporting Study. The results of 
this study, which was conducted jointly with the General Accounting Office of the United 
States, will be published in the coming months. 



3-6 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

The development of accounting principles that are appropriate for Canadian governments 
and generally accepted by financial statement users, preparers and auditors is progressing. As 
a chartered accountant, I am proud of the leadership shown by the CICA. As Auditor 
General of Canada, I am encouraged by the Government's continued support of the CICA 
and the interest shown in making the financial statements that I audit more responsive to 
user needs. 



SECTION 



4 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Envelopes and Outlays, 
Estimates and Appropriations 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Envelopes and outlays 4.2 

Details of outlays by envelope 4.2 

Outlays of departments by envelope 4.6 

Estimates and appropriations — 

Parliamentary spending authorities 4.7 

Budgetary and non-budgetary appropriations and spending — 

Annual and statutory 4.8 

Reconciliation of outlays for loans, investments and 

advances to non-budgetary use of appropriations 4.9 



4*2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



ENVELOPES AND OUTLAYS 

The increasing complexity of Government responsibilities 
and the limited resources available to meet those responsibili- 
ties led to the policy and expenditure management system. 
Under this system, the Government manages the resources 
made available to it by "envelopes". Each envelope represents 
the resources allocated to a particular policy sector for all 
elements of departmental spending that relate to that sector. 

Under the envelope system, spending is measured in terms 
of outlays for budgetary expenditure and for loans, invest- 
ments and advances. Outlays for budgetary expenditure 
include costs of servicing the public debt, operating and capital 



expenditure, grants and contributions to other levels of govern- 
ment, persons and organizations, and other forms of transfer 
payments. Outlays for loans, investments and advances repre- 
sent the net change in loans, investments and advances. 



Details of Outlays by Envelope 

Table 4. 1 presents outlays on a comparative basis for budg- 
etary expenditure and for loans, investments and advances by 
major element within each envelope. 



TABLE 4.1 

DETAILS OF OUTLAYS BY ENVELOPE 

(in millions of dollars) 



1 985 



1984 



SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department: culture 

Canada Council 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commis- 
sion 

National Arts Centre Corporation 

National Film Board 

National Library 

National Museums of Canada 

Public Archives 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION— 

Department 

Canada Employment and Immigration Commission 

Immigration Appeal Board 

ENVIRONMENT— 

Department: excluding forestry 

National Battlefields Commission 

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT— 

Department 

Northern Canada Power Commission 

JUSTICE— 

Department 

Canadian Human Rights Commission 

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 

Federal Court of Canada 

Law Reform Commission of Canada 

Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of 
Canada 

Supreme Court of Canada 

Tax Court of Canada 

LABOUR— 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE— 

Department 

Fitness and amateur sport program 

Medical Research Council 

SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Department 

Advisory Council on the Status of Women 

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 

Status of Women — Office of the Co-ordinator 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

SOLICITOR GENERAL— 

Department 

Correctional Service 

National Parole Board 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 





Loans, 






Loans. 




Budgetary 


investments 




Budgetary 


investments 




expenditure 


and advances 


Total 


expenditure 


and advances 


Total 


86 


(1) 


86 


81 


(1) 


81 


73 




73 


66 




66 


905 




905 


816 




816 


46 


-3 


43 


16 


(1) 


16 


25 


(1) 


25 


24 


(1) 


24 


15 




15 


14 




14 


61 




61 


57 




57 


30 


(1) 


30 


30 




30 


74 


(1) 


74 


69 


(I) 


69 


39 


(I) 


39 


37 


(I) 


37 


8 


6 


14 


9 


3 


12 


4,982 




4,982 


4,807 




4.807 


4 




4 


4 




4 


753 

1 


(1) 


753 
I 


714 


(1) 


714 


2,251 


-14 


2,237 


2.052 


5 


2.057 




-5 


-5 


(1) 


21 


21 


134 


(1) 


134 


109 


(1) 


109 


9 




9 


8 




8 


89 


(1) 


89 


82 


(1) 


82 


8 




8 


7 




7 


5 




5 


5 




5 


3 




3 


1 


(1) 


1 


6 




6 


5 




5 


3 


(1) 


3 


2 




2 


1,965 


-365 


1,600 


1.604 


-194 


1.410 


7 




7 


5 




5 


24,655 


(1) 


24,655 


22.345 


(1) 


22.345 


102 


(1) 


102 


69 


(1) 


69 


157 




157 


140 




140 


3,043 


(I) 


3,043 


2,748 


(1) 


2,748 


2 




2 


2 


(1) 


2 


63 




63 


60 




60 


3 


(1) 


3 


2 




2 


3 




3 


6 




6 


40 


(1) 


40 


28 


(1) 


28 


740 


(1) 


740 


652 


(1) 


652 


14 


(1) 


14 


14 




14 


836 


1 


837 


802 


(1) 


802 



ENVELOPES AND OUTLAYS, ESTIMATES AND APPROPRIATIONS 
TABLE 4.1 



4'3 



DETAILS OF OUTLAYS BY E^\ELO?E— Continued 

(in millions of dollars) 



1985 



1984 



SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 
Canadian Unity Information Office program. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 



ECONOMIC AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

AGRICULTURE— 

Department 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board 

Canagrex 

Farm Credit Corporation 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department — 

Communications: excluding culture 

CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Restrictive Trade Practices Commission 

Standards Council of Canada 

ECONOMIC AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

ENERGY, MINES AND RESOURCES— 

Department 

Atomic Energy Control Board 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

National Energy Board 

Petro-Canada 

Petro-Canada International Assistance Corporation 

ENVIRONMENT: forestry 

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS— 

Department — 

Grains and oilseeds program 

Program for export market development 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 

Export Development Corporation 

FISHERIES AND OCEANS— 

Department 

Canadian Saltfish Corporation 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation 

LABOUR— 

Department 

Canada Labour Relations Board 

REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION— 

Department 

Canada Development Investment Corporation 

Canadair Financial Corporation Inc 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited 

Federal Business Development Bank 

Foreign Investment Review Agency 

Teleglobe Canada 

The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY— 

Ministry of State 

National Research Council of Canada 

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 

Science Council of Canada 

SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 

Department: unsolicited proposals for research and develop- 
ment and source development fund 

TRANSPORT- 
DC partment 

Air Canada 

Canadian Aviation Safety Board 

Canadian Transport Commission 

Northern Pipeline Agency 

Office of the Grain Transportation Agency Administrator... 





Loans, 






Loans, 




Budgetary 


investments 




Budgetary 


investments 




expenditure 


and advances 


Total 


expenditure 


and advances 


ToUl 


14 




14 


20 




20 


1,459 


-32 


1,427 


1,388 


-31 


1,357 


42,713 


-412 


42,301 


38,900 


-196 


38,704 


1,563 


-3 


1.560 


1,370 


-3 


1,367 


6 


37 


43 


5 


-185 


-180 


19 




19 


17 


(1) 


17 


5 




5 


1 




1 




-171 


-171 




379 


379 


166 




166 


159 


(1) 


159 


194 


(I) 


194 


262 


(1) 


262 


7 




7 


6 




6 


6 


(1) 


6 


20 


(1) 


20 


4,128 


1 


4,129 


3,003 


7 


3.010 


20 




20 


19 


(1) 


19 


326 


-38 


288 


336 


-37 


299 


24 


(1) 


24 


23 


(1) 


23 


17 




17 


12 


612 


624 


60 




60 


65 




65 


65 




65 


48 




48 


138 




138 


152 




152 


33 




33 


27 




27 


17 




17 


17 




17 




116 


116 


12 


120 


132 


721 


114 


835 


609 


38 


647 




-2 


-2 




6 


6 




6 


6 




-8 


-8 


129 


(1) 


129 


105 


(1) 


105 


6 


(1) 


6 


5 


(1) 


5 


1,070 


-33 


1,037 


1,028 


-19 
(1) 


1,009 

(1) 


300 




300 


550 


(1) 


550 


108 


2 


110 


110 


11 
-5 


121 
-5 


31 


-157 


-126 


78 


-172 


-94 


7 




. 7 


6 




6 




-1 


-1 




-3 


-3 


150 


-4 


146 


300 




300 


7 


(1) 


7 


11 


(1) 


II 


468 


(1) 


468 


396 


(1) 


396 


312 




312 


281 




281 


5 




5 


5 




5 


17 




17 


23 




23 


2,905 


-4 


2,901 


2,790 


61 


2,851 




-18 


-18 




-17 


-17 


5 




5 








786 


(1) 


786 


469 


(1) 


469 


4 
1 


(1) 


4 
1 


6 


(1) 


6 


13,827 


-155 


13,672 


12,327 


785 


13,112 



4*4 
TABLE 4.1 

DETAILS OF OUTLAYS BY ENVELOPE— Continued 

(in millions of dollars) 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



FISCAL ARRANGEMENTS 

FINANCE— 
Department — 
Fiscal transfer payments program 
PUBLIC WORKS— 
Department — 
Municipal grants 



1985 



1984 



Loans, 
Budgetary investments 
expenditure and advances 



Total 



Loans, 
Budgetary investments 
expenditure and advances 



5,813 

272 



6,085 



-38 



-38 



5,775 
272 



5,647 



231 



6,047 



5,878 



16 



16 



Total 



5,631 

231 



5,862 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS AND AID 

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS— 
Department: excluding grains and oilseeds program and pro- 
gram for exf)ort market development 

Canadian International Development Agency 

International Development Research Centre 

International Joint Commission 

FINANCE— 
Department — 
Financial and economic policies program; development assist- 
ance 

DEFENCE 

NATIONAL DEFENCE 



700 


1 


701 


605 


-5 


600 


1,333 


338 


1,671 


1,089 


256 


1.345 


81 




81 


67 




67 


3 




3 


3 




3 





214 


214 




236 


236 


2,117 


553 


2,670 


1,764 


487 


2,251 


8,926 


8 


8,934 


7,972 


1 


7.973 



PARLIAMENT AND SERVICES TO GOVERNMENT 

FINANCE— 
Department — 

Financial and economic policies program: excluding develop- 
ment assistance 

Canadian Import Tribunal program 

Inspector general of banks program 

Special program 

Auditor General 

Insurance 

Tariff Board 

GOVERNOR GENERAL 

NATIONAL REVENUE— 

Customs and Excise 

Taxation 

Canada Post Corporation 

PARLIAMENT— 

The Senate 

House of Commons 

Library of Parliament 



90 


40 


130 


69 


- 140 


-71 


2 




2 


2 




2 


2 




2 


1 




I 


(1) 


1 


1 


(1) 


1 


1 


40 




40 


38 


(1) 


38 


13 




13 


13 




13 


3 




3 


2 




2 


6 




6 


5 




5 


409 


(1) 


409 


378 


(1) 


378 


663 


(1) 


663 


604 


(1) 


604 


516 




516 


483 




483 


26 


(1) 


26 


23 


(1) 


23 


158 


(1) 


158 


145 


(1) 


145 


10 


(I) 


10 


10 


(1) 


10 



ENVELOPES AND OUTLAYS, ESTIMATES AND APPROPRIATIONS 
TABLE 4.1 



4*5 



JJ ' 



DETAILS OF OUTLAYS BY EHyELO?E— Concluded 

(in millions of dollars) 



198S 



1984 



PRIVY COUNCIL— 

Department 

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Commissioner of Official Languages 

Economic Council of Canada 

Public Service Staff Relations Board 

PUBLIC WORKS— 

Department: excluding municipal grants 

National Capital Commission 

SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Public Service Commission 

SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 

Department: excluding unsolicited proposals for research and 
development, source development fund and Canadian 
Unity Information Office program 

Royal Canadian Mint 

Statistics Canada 

TREASURY BOARD— 

Secretariat 

Comptroller General 



PUBLIC DEBT 





Loans, 






Loans, 




Budgetary 


investments 




BudgeUry 


investments 




expenditure 


and advances 


Total 


expenditure 


and advances 


Toul 


52 


(0 


52 


50 


(1) 


SO 


3 




3 


2 




2 


94 




94 


6 


(1) 


6 


9 




9 


9 


(1) 


9 


8 




8 


8 




8 


8 


(1) 


8 


8 




8 


1,064 


(I) 


1,064 


917 


5 


922 


97 


-5 


92 


86 


(1) 


86 



FINANCE- 
DC partment — 
Public debt program 

TOTAL 



113 



22,551 



100,254 



(I) 



10 



113 



106 



22,551 



18,146 



100,244 



88,615 



925 



106 



171 
208 


(1) 

-2 

(1) 


171 
-2 
208 


208 
190 


(1) 

-2 
(1) 


208 

-2 
190 


259 
11 


(1) 


259 
11 


254 
11 


(I) 


254 
11 


4,035 


34 


4,069 


3,628 


-136 


3,492 



18,146 



89,540 



<" Less than $500,000. 



4*6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Outlays of Departments by Envelope 

Table 4.2 discloses departmental responsibility for outlays 
by envelope. 

TABLE 4.2 

OUTLAYS OF DEPARTMENTS BY ENVELOPE 

(in millions of dollars) 



Social Economic 
devel- and Fiscal 
op- regional arrange- 
ment development ments 



Parliament 
External and 

affairs services to 

and aid Defence Government 



Public 
debt 



Agriculture 

Communications 1,351 

1.210 
Consumer and Corporate Affairs 

Economic and Regional Development 

Employment and Immigration 5,000 

4.823 
Energy, Mines and Resources 

Environment 754 

714 
External Affairs 

Finance 

Fisheries and Oceans 

Governor General 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development 2,232 

2.078 

Justice 257 

219 

Labour 1,607 

1.415 

National Defence 

National Health and Welfare 24,914 

22.554 
National Revenue 

Parliament 

Privy Council 

Public Works 

Regional Industrial Expansion 

Science and Technology 

Secretary of State 3,1 1 1 

2,812 

Social Development 3 

6 

Solicitor General 1,631 

1.496 

Supply and Services 14 

20 
Transport 

Treasury Board 

Veterans Affairs 1,427 

l'.357 

Total outlays (net) 42,301 

38.704 

Amounts in roman type are 1984-85 outlays. 
Amounts in italic type are 1983-84 outlays. 



1,456 

1.584 

166 

159 

202 

269 

6 

20 



4,538 

4.040 

65 

48 

304 

328 



839 
645 



135 
NO 



1,473 

1.884 

792 

693 



17 

23 

3,679 

3,309 



5,775 
5.631 



2,456 

2,015 

214 

236 



191 
-14 



22,551 
18.146 



8,934 
7.973 



272 
231 



1,588 

1.465 

194 

178 

174 

83 

1,156 

1.008 



113 
106 



377 
396 



270 
265 



Total 
outlays 



1,456 

1,584 

1,517 

1.369 

202 

269 

6 

20 

5,000 

4.823 

4,538 

4.040 

819 

762 

2.760 

2.343 

28,731 

23.999 

839 

645 

6 

5 

2,232 

2.078 

257 

219 

1,742 

1.525 

8,934 

7,973 

24,914 

22.554 

1,588 

1.465 

194 

178 

174 

83 

1,428 

1,239 

1,473 

1.884 

792 

693 

3,224 

2.918 

3 

6 

1,631 

1.496 

408 

439 

3,679 

3.309 

270 

265 

1,427 

1.357 



13,672 
13.112 



6,047 
5.862 



2,670 
2.251 



8,934 
7.973 



4,069 
3.492 



22,551 
18.146 



100,244 
89,540 



ENVELOPES AND OUTLA YS, ESTIMA TES AND APPROPRIA TIONS 

ESTIMATES AND APPROPRIATIONS 



4*7 



Parliamentary Spending Authorities 

The Government submits its spending proposals to Parlia- 
ment in the annual Estimates. During the year, the Govern- 
ment may request further appropriations. The initial request is 
called the "Main Estimates" and additional requests are called 
"Supplementary Estimates". With these Estimates, the Gov- 
ernment requests authority for that part of the proposed 
spending which is not already provided by other statutes. The 
amounts making up the total of such proposed spending are 
authorized in appropriation acts and are generally referred to 
as "annual" authorities. The balance of the planned spending 
is made under authority of other statutes which authorize 
disbursements for specified purposes, and for such amounts 
and time periods as are set by those acts. The proposed or 
estimated uses of most of these "statutory" authorities for the 
current year are included in the Estimates for information 
purposes; however, they are not included in appropriation acts 
because they have already been authorized by Parliament. 

Annual authorities, with few exceptions, lapse at the end of 
the year if not used, while statutory authorities, with few 



exceptions, are carried forward to future years. Those authori- 
ties which extend to subsequent years are referred to as 
"non-lapsing". 

Both the budgetary expenditure amounts and the non- 
budgetary requirements for loans, investments and advances 
are included under each type of spending authority, annual 
and statutory. 

Table 4.3 presents, for the year ended March 31, 1985, a 
summary of parliamentary spending authorities requested and 
approved (annual authority), and estimated uses of authorities 
already granted (statutory authority). 

A Statement of Use of Appropriations by department, as 
examined by the Auditor General, is presented in Section 2 of 
this volume. Additional details of appropriations and expendi- 
ture by department and by type (annual and statutory) are 
given in the Introduction (Table 2) of Volume II, and in the 
departmental sections of the same volume. 



TABLE 4.3 

PARLIAMENTARY SPENDING AUTHORITIES 

(in millions of dollars) 



Annual 



ESTIMATES 

Spending proposals presented to Parliament: 

Main Estimates — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Supplementary Estimates (A) — Budgetary 

Supplementary Estimates (B) — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary . 

Supplementary Estimates (C) — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary . 

Total — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

APPROPRIATIONS 

Granted by Parliament in appropriation acts: 
Appropriation Act No. I — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Appropriation Act No. 2 — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Appropriation Act No. 3 — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Appropriation Act No. 4 — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Total — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 



40,497 
354 



10,274 

85 

26.852 

237 

2.153 

2 

1.218 

30 



40.497 
354 



Authority 



Statutory 



Total 



36.830 


57.724 


94.554 


322 


1,648 


1,970 


296 




296 


2.153 


4.043 


6.196 


2 


1 


3 


1.218 


620 


1.838 


30 


-1 


29 



62,387 
1,648 



102.884 
2,002 



Amounts in roman type are budgetary. 

Amounts in bold face type are non-budgetary loans, investments and advances. 



4-8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Budgetary and Non-budgetary Appropriations 
and Spending — Annual and Statutory 

Budgetary appropriations provide spending authority for 
those transactions which enter into the calculation of the 
annual deficit or surplus of the Government. Non-budgetary 
appropriations provide spending authority for all transactions 
which result in the acquisition or disposal of loans, investments 
and advances. Balances of appropriations brought forward 
from the previous years are available for spending, together 
with current increases to such authorities. 

The totals of these authorities are reduced by the amount of 
their current year use to determine the balances which lapse, 
are overexpended or are carried forward to future years, 
depending upon the type of authority. In cases where the 
spending of loan repayments is authorized, the non-budgetary 
spending is reported net of such repayments. 



Table 4.4 presents details of the total available parliamen- 
tary spending authorities. They include brought forward 
authorities, parliamentary spending authorities as per Table 
4.3 and various adjustments which are explained in the notes 
to the table. 

Table 4.5 presents a summary of budgetary and non-budge- 
tary appropriations and spending made under annual and 
non-lapsing appropriations and various statutory authorities 
for the year ended March 31, 1985. 

Further departmental details are presented in the Introduc- 
tion of Volume II (Table 2). 



TABLE 4.4 

TOTAL AVAILABLE PARLIAMENTARY SPENDING AUTHORITIES 

(in millions of dollars) 



22 


40,497 


-46 


40,473 


1,783 


354 


279 


2,416 


658 


62,387 


310 


63.355 


25,728 


1,648 


-402 


26,974 



Total 
available 
Estimates parliamentary 

Brought and Authorized spending 

forward appropriations changes'" authorities 

Annual — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Statutory — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Total— Budgetary 680 102,884 264 103,828 

Non-budgetary 27,511 2,002 - 123 29,390 

'" These authorized changes include items such as: 

(a) reserved allotments established to provide payment authority for the overexpenditure of previous year's appropriations which resulted from Payables at Year 
End (PAYE); 

(b) adjustments to items displayed in the Estimates on an informational basis to reflect actual spending and of certain authorities carried forward to reflect 
authorities available; and, 

(c) adjustments to authorities granted in statutes other than appropriation acts. 

Further details can be obtained by referring to the authorized changes column of the Use of Appropriations statements in the departmental sections of Volume II. 
Amounts in roman type are budgetary. 
Amounts in bold face type are non-budgetary loans, investments and advances. 



TABLE 4.5 

BUDGETARY AND NON-BUDGETARY APPROPRIATIONS AND SPENDING— ANNUAL AND STATUTORY 

(in millions of dollars) 



Annual — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Statutory — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

Total — Budgetary 

Non-budgetary 

('> Represents total available parliamentary spending authorities. 

Amounts in roman type are budgetary. 

Amounts in bold face type are non-budgetary loans, investments and advances. 



Appropriations") 


Used 


Lapsed 


Overexpended 


Carried 
forward 


40,473 

2,416 

63,355 

26,974 


38,095 
423 

62,159 
459 


2,359 

74 

305 


21 


40 

1,919 

891 

26,515 


103,828 
29,390 


100,254 
882 


2,664 
74 


21 


931 
28,434 



ENVELOPES AND OVTLA YS, ESTIMA TES ANDAPPROPRIA TIONS 



4-9 



Reconciliation of Outlays for Loans, Investments and 
Advances to Non-budgetary Use of Appropriations 

The following presents a reconciliation of total outlays for 
loans, investments and advances, as shown in Table 4.1, with 
the total of non-budgetary appropriations used in the current 
year, as shown in the Statement of Use of Appropriations in 
Section 2 of this volume. 



The major difference relates to repayments of loans under 
appropriations which do not authorize spending of repayments. 
Such amounts are deducted from gross outlays for envelope 
reporting but not for reporting the use of appropriations. 



Total outlays for loans, investments and advances as per Table 4.1 

Add: adjustments to non-budgetary authority items which are not required for use of appropriations reporting — 

repayments of loans under appropriations which do not authorize spending of repayments 

other adjustments 

Total non-budgetary use of appropriations as per the audited Statement of Use of Appropriations in Section 2 of this volume 



Non-budgetary 

loans, investments 

and advances 

(in millions of dollars) 

-10 

872 
20 



882 



I 



I 



SECTION 



5 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Budgetary Revenue 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Budgetary revenue 5.2 

Tax revenue 5.6 

Non-tax revenue 5.8 

Supplementary statement — 

Monthly revenue by selected classification 5.9 



5*2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



BUDGETARY REVENUE 

Budgetary revenue consists of all tax and non-tax receipts 
which affect the annual deficit or surplus of the Government, 
and includes revenue internal to the Government. 

The Government generally reports revenue in the year in 
which it is received, with refunds of revenue allocated to the 
year in which they are actually paid. 

Revenue is reported after deducting refunds paid, and 
excludes amounts receivable, taxes collected on behalf of 
provinces and territories, and amounts credited to the Canada 
Pension Plan Account, the Unemployment Insurance Account, 
superannuation accounts, other specified purpose accounts, 
and other liability accounts. 

Revenue for a year, therefore, includes receipts credited to 
the Receiver General by the Bank of Canada and the char- 
tered banks by March 31, and amounts received in Govern- 
ment offices by March 31, but not deposited until April, or not 
credited to the Receiver General until April. Revenue also 
includes the amounts received in the mail on the first working 
day of April, except where it is clear that it was the remitter's 
intention to discharge an obligation arising in the new year. 

The yield from tax revenue is affected by changes in tax 
rates, by changes in the base on which taxes are calculated, 
and by variations in economic conditions. A taxpayer's income 
tax liability relates to the income of a taxation year, but 
advance collection of personal and corporation income taxes by 
payroll deductions and instalments results in a distribution of 
receipts throughout the year. 



The major tax changes which had an effect on this year's 
tax revenue are: 

— personal income tax — the standard deduction of $100 for 
medical receipts and/or charitable donations was 
repealed; the federal tax reduction was lowered to $100 
from $200; and, the indexation of exemptions and brack- 
ets was capped to a maximum increase of 5% in 1984; 

— incremental oil revenue tax (lORT) — the provisions that 
suspended the lORT on conventional oil from June 1, 
1983 to May 31, 1984 were extended a further year to 
May 31, 1985. Since incremental revenues can be deduct- 
ed from corporate taxable income, this suspension of the 
lORT meant a partially offsetting increase in corporation 
income tax revenue; 

— sales tax — sales tax rates were raised 1 percentage point, 
effective October 1, 1984; and, 

— customs import duties — as scheduled under the Multilat- 
eral Trade Negotiations, the sixth of eight annual tariff 
reductions was implemented in January 1985. 

Under fiscal arrangements that became operative in 1962, 
the federal Government entered into tax collection agreements 
to collect the personal income taxes of all provinces and 
territories (except Quebec) and the corporation income taxes 
of all provinces and territories (except Ontario, Quebec and 
Alberta). Personal and corporation income taxes collected by 
the federal Government on behalf of the provinces and territo- 
ries are not included in the tables shown hereunder. 



BUDGETARY REVENUE 



5'3 



REVENUE 

"Five year comparative summary" 
Millions of dollars 



64,137 100% 



45,398 1 00% 




8,553 




19,837 




L 



19% 



1981 



54.854 100°>« 





12,000 22% 





13% 



44% 



56,012 100% 



6,946^ 12% 



2,831 5% 



13% 




57,131 100% 



47% 




12,766 23% Vh^jl ^^ 





12% 



13% 



14,250 22% 



15% 



OTHER REVENUE 



^'*> CUSTOMS IMPORT DUTIES 



EXCISE DUTIES. SALES AND 
OTHER EXCISE TAXES 



CORPORATION INCOME TAX 



45% PERSONAL INCOME TAX 



1982 



1983 



1984 



1985 



5-4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Table 5.1 presents budgetary revenue by main classification 
and source on both a gross and net basis and segregates 
revenue internal to the Government from revenue from outside 
parties. The difference between gross and net revenue is 



revenue credited to appropriations. Other tables in this section 
provide additional details for total net revenue (with outside 
parties and internal to the Government). 



TABLE 5.1 

BUDGETARY REVENUE BY MAIN CLASSIFICATION AND SOURCE 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



Gross 
revenue 

Internal 

From to the 
outside Govern- 

parties ment Total*'" 

Tax revenue — 
Income tax — 

Personal 29,254 29,254 

Corporation 9,379 9,379 

Non-resident 1,021 1,021 

39.654 39,654 
Excise taxes and duties — 

Sales tax 7,592 137 7,729 

Customs import duties 3,794 2 3,796 

Excise duties 1,462 1,462 

Other 1,076 "* 1,076 

13.924 139 14.063 
Energy taxes — 
Petroleum and gas revenue tax and 

incremental oil revenue tax 2,563 2,563 

Canadian Ownership special 

charge 850 850 

Oil export charges 408 408 

Excise tax — Gasoline 404 404 

Natural gas and gas liquids tax -15 -I -16 

Petroleum compensation charge ... 2,208 2,208 

6.418 -1 6.417 

20.342 138 20.480 

Other tax revenue 107 107 

Total tax revenue 60,103 138 60,241 

Non-tax revenue — 
Return on investments — 

Bank of Canada 1,852 1,852 

Canada Mortgage and Housing 

Corporation 913 913 

Farm Credit Corporation 452 452 

Interest on bank deposits 243 243 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances 414 414 

Other return on investments 1,307 91 1,398 

5.181 91 5.272 

Refundsof previous years' expenditure.. 344 6 350 

Services and service fees 998 908 1,906 

Privileges, licences and permits 284 284 

Proceeds from sales 257 132 389 

Domestic coinage 70 70 

Premium and discount on exchange 61 61 

Other non-tax revenue 1,285 866 2,151 

3.299 1.912 5.211 

Total non-tax revenue 8,480 2,003 10,483 

Total revenue 68,583 2,1.41 70,724 

<" Less than $500,000. 

<2> Reflected on the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure in Section 2 of this volume. 



Revenue credited 




Net 




to appropriations 




revenue 






Internal 




Internal 




From 


to the 


From 


to the 




outside 


Govern- 


outside 


Govern- 




parties 


ment 


parties 


ment 


Tota|(2) 






29,254 




29,254 






9,379 




9,379 






1,021 




1,021 






39.654 




39.654 






7,592 


137 


7,729 






3,794 


2 


3,796 






1,462 




1,462 


226 




850 


(1) 


850 


226 




13.698 


139 


13.837 



2,563 



2,208 
2.208 
2.434 



2,434 



57,669 



1,852 



2,222 



1,931 



6,258 



4,656 



1,931 



63,927 



138 



72 



210 



2,563 



850 




850 


408 




408 


404 




404 


- 15 


-1 


-16 


4.210 


-/ 


4.209 


7.908 


138 


18.046 


107 




107 



57,807 



1,852 







913 




913 






452 




452 






243 




243 






414 




414 




70 


1,307 


21 


1,328 




70 


5.181 


21 


5.202 






344 


6 


350 


849 


905 


149 


3 


152 


153 




131 




131 


169 


120 


88 
70 
61 


12 


100 
70 
61 


1,051 


836 


234 


30 


264 


2.222 


1.861 


1.077 


51 


1.128 



6,330 



64,137 



BUDGETARY REVENUE 



5*5 









1983-84 














Gross 




Revenue credited 




Net 








revenue 




to appropriations 




revenue 








Internal 






Internal 




Internal 




Increase or 


From 


to the 




From 


to the 


From 


to the 




decrease ( - ) 


outside 


Govern- 




outside 


Govern- 


outside 


Govern- 




in total net 


parties 


ment 


Total<« 


parties 


ment 


parties 


ment 


Total<" 


revenue 


26.967 




26,967 






26,967 




26,967 


2,287 


7,286 




7,286 






7,286 




7,286 


2,093 


908 




908 






908 




908 


113 


35.161 




35.161 






35.161 




35.161 


4.49$ 


6,561 


99 


6,660 






6,561 


99 


6,660 


1,069 


3,376 


4 


3,380 






3,376 


4 


3,380 


416 


1,356 


(1) 


1,356 






1,356 


(1) 


1,356 


106 


962 


1 


963 


208 




754 


I 


755 


95 


12.255 


104 


12.359 


208 




12.047 


104 


12.151 


1.686 



2,106 



2,106 



2.106 



2,106 



457 



805 




805 




215 




215 




386 


(1) 


386 




524 


(1) 


524 




1,750 




1,750 


1,750 


5.786 




5.786 


1.750 


18.041 


104 


18.145 


1.958 


126 




126 





805 




805 


45 


215 




215 


193 


386 


(■> 


386 


18 


524 


(1) 


524 


-540 


4.036 




4.036 


173 


6.083 


104 


16.187 


1.859 


126 




126 


-19 



53,328 



104 



53.432 



1.958 



51,370 



104 



51,474 



6,333 



1,744 



1,744 



1.744 



1,744 



108 



941 




941 






941 




941 


-28 


408 




408 






408 




408 


44 


395 




395 






393 




395 


-152 


591 




591 






591 




591 


-177 


655 


91 


746 




78 


655 


13 


668 


660 


4.734 


91 


4.825 




78 


4.734 


13 


4.747 


455 


267 


3 


270 






267 


3 


270 


80 


857 


876 


1.733 


702 


874 


155 


2 


157 


-5 


257 




257 


139 




118 




118 


13 


237 


105 


342 


172 


97 


65 


8 


73 


27 


56 




56 






56 




56 


14 


19 




19 






19 




19 


42 


1,349 


559 


1.908 


1.161 


530 


188 


29 


217 


47 


3.042 


1.543 


4.585 


2.174 


1.501 


868 


42 


910 


218 


1,116 


1.634 


9.410 


2,174 


1,579 


5.602 


55 


5.657 


673 


61,104 


1.738 


62.842 


4,132 


1.579 


56.972 


159 


57.131 


7,006 



5*6 

Tax Revenue 

Table 5.2 presents tax revenue on a per capita basis for the 
last five years. 

TABLE 5.2 

TAX REVENUE PER CAPITA 

Tax 
revenue 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Excise Taxes and Duties 



198S 
1984 
1983 
1982 
1981 



2,283 
2.053 
2.021 
1.983 
1.674 



Personal Income Tax 

This tax is levied on personal income under the provisions of 
the Income Tax Act. 

In 1984-85, personal income tax was the largest source of 
Government revenue. It amounted to $29,254 million, or 46% 
of total net budgetary revenue. 



Corporation Income Tax 

This tax is levied on corporation income under the provisions 
of the Income Tax Act. 

Corporation income tax was the second largest source of 
Government revenue. It amounted to $9,379 million in 1984- 
85, or 15% of total net budgetary revenue. 



Non-Resident Income Tax 

The non-resident income tax is levied on the income earned 
in Canada by non-residents. It is derived from tax withheld 
from dividends, interest, rents, royalties, alimony, and income 
from estates and trusts, paid to non-residents. It amounted to 
$1,021 million in 1984-85, or 2% of total net budgetary 
revenue. 



Excise taxes and duties totalled $18,046 million in 1984-85, 
or 28% of total net budgetary revenue. 

TABLE 5.3 

EXCISE TAXES AND DUTIES 
(in millions of dollars) 

Increase or 
1 984-85 1 983-84 decrease ( - ) 



Sales tax — 

Domestic goods 

Imports 

L«f 5; refunds and drawbacks .. 

Customs import duties 

Less: refunds and drawbacks .. 

Excise duties — 
Cigarettes, tobacco and cigars 

Spirits 

Beer 

Licences 

Less: refunds and drawbacks .. 



6,550 

1,509 

330 

7.729 

4,224 

428 

3.796 

576 

523 

363 

(I) 

(I) 

1.462 



Energy taxes — 
Petroleum and gas revenue tax 

and incremental oil revenue 

tax 2,563 

Canadian Ownership special 

charge 

Oil export charges 

Excise tax — Gasoline 

Natural gas and gas liquids tax 

. -0 ' 
Other- 
Cigarettes, tobacco and cigars .. 

Wines 

Jewellery 

Telecommunications program- 
ming services 

Automotive air conditioners 

Penalties 

Lighters 

Coin games 

Sundry commodities 

Less: refunds and drawbacks .... 

Total 18.046 

<') Less than $500,000. 



5.574 

1.341 

255 

6.660 

3.767 

387 

3.380 

540 

478 

338 

(I) 

(I) 

1.356 



2,106 



976 

168 

75 

1.069 

457 

41 

416 

36 

45 
25 



106 



457 



850 


805 


45 


408 


215 


193 


404 


386 


18 


-16 


524 


-540 


4.209 


4.036 


173 


596 


537 


59 


98 


85 


13 


51 


47 


4 


45 


28 


17 


38 


28 


10 


13 


20 


-7 


3 


3 




2 


4 


-2 


7 


5 


2 


3 


2 


1 


850 


755 


95 



16.187 



1.859 



BUDGETARY REVENUE 

Sales tax 

The sales tax, totalling $7,729 million in 1984-85, was the 
most important tax levied under the Excise Tax Act. 



Customs import duties 



The revenues from customs import duties, consisting mainly 
of ad valorem taxes on the importation of goods, totalled 
$3,796 million in 1984-85. 

Excise duties 

Excise duties, which totalled $1,462 million in 1984-85, are 
levied on alcoholic beverages (other than wines) and tobacco 
products. (Additional taxes on tobacco products and taxes on 
wines are levied under the Excise Tax Act.) 

Petroleum and gas revenue tax and incremental oil 
revenue tax 

The petroleum and gas revenue tax came into effect on 
January 1, 1981, and is applicable to net operating revenues 
related to the production of oil and gas. 

The incremental oil revenue tax became effective January 1 , 
1 982 and is levied on incremental revenues from oil discovered 
prior to 1981 and results from differences between the well- 
head oil prices and the prices as scheduled in the National 
Energy Program of 1980. Commencing in June 1982, this tax 
has been suspended for three years for conventional oil. This 
tax remains in place for petroleum produced from tar sands 
mining projects in commercial production prior to 1976. 



5*7 

Canadian Ownership special charge 

This charge is levied to increase public ownership of the oil 
and gas industry in Canada. Amounts received from the 
Canadian Ownership special charge were previously credited 
to the Canadian Ownership Account. See Note 2 to the 
audited flnancial statements included in Section 2 of this 
volume. 



Oil export charges 

The federal share of revenues from oil export charges 
totalled $408 million in 1984-85. In accordance with Section 
1 7.1(0(6) of the Energy Administration Act, oil export 
charges are shared with oil producing provinces. The share is 
in respect of oil produced in, and exported from, provinces 
during the year. 



Excise tax — Gasoline 

Receipts from the excise tax — Gasoline were $404 million in 
1984-85. Under certain conditions, the amounts received may 
be refunded to purchasers. As of March 31, 1985, $477 million 
was received, and $73 million was refunded and charged to 
revenue. 



Natural gas and gas liquids tax 

This tax, which came into effect during 1980-81, was 
imposed on all sales of natural gas and gas liquids. Its rate has 
been set at zero per cent effective February 1 , 1 984. 



5 '8 

Non-Tax Revenue 

Return on Investments 

Return on investments consists mainly of interest from loan 
and advances, transfer of profits and surpluses, and renta 
income from properties. 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Return on investments, related to the assets on the State- 
ment of Assets and Liabilities, is summarized in Table 5.4. 
Additional details are given in Section 14 of this volume and in 
the departmental sections of Volume II. 



TABLE 5.4 

RETURN ON INVESTMENTS 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



1983-84 



Loans, investments and advances — 
Crown corporations — 
Lending institutions — 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Federal Business Development Bank 

All other Crown corporations — 

Air Canada 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Canadian National Railways 

Other- 
Bank of Canada 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Northern Canada Power Commission 

Royal Canadian Mint 

Miscellaneous 

Provincial and territorial governments 

National governments including developing countries . 

International organizations 

Veterans' Land Act Fund — Advances 

Joint and mixed enterprises 

Miscellaneous 



Foreign exchange accounts — 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances 

International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 

Cash — 

Interest on bank deposits 

Other accounts — 

Interest on loans to the Unemployment Insurance Account 

Government's holdings of unmatured debt 

Rental income from properties 

Interest on investment re: military purchases 

Supply revolving fund 

Other 

Total 

('•Less than $500,000. 



Increase 



decrease ( - ) 





5 


-5 


913 


941 


-28 


24 


34 


-10 


452 


408 


44 


34 


50 


-16 


1.423 


1.438 


-15 


18 


19 


-1 


81 


44 


37 


62 


20 


42 


1,852 


1,744 


108 


18 


31 


-13 


19 


34 


-15 


5 


26 


-21 


11 


II 




2.066 


1.929 


137 


3,489 


3,367 


122 


91 


95 


-4 


51 


59 


-8 


(1) 


(1) 




12 


14 


-2 


4 


6 


-2 


31 


19 


12 


189 


193 


-4 


3,678 


3,560 


118 


414 


591 


-177 


15 


10 


5 


429 


601 


-172 


243 


395 


- 152 


739 


117 


622 


69 


32 


37 


22 


21 


1 


13 


7 


6 


5 


10 


-5 


4 


4 




852 


191 


661 



5.202 



4,747 



455 



BUDGETARY REVENUE 

SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 



5*9 



Monthly Revenue by Selected Classification 

Revenue by selected classification is presented by month in 
Table 5.5. 

TABLE 5.5 

MONTHLY REVENUE BY SELECTED CLASSIFICATION 

(in millions of dollars) 



Corpora- 
Personal tion 
income income 
tax tax 

April, 1984 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1985 

February 

March 

Supplementary ... 

Total 29,254 9,379 

*'• Includes the incremental oil revenue tax 



Non- 
resident 
income 
tax 



Sales 
tax 



Customs 
import 
duties 



Excise 
duties 



Canadian 
Petroleum Owner- 
and gas ship 
revenue special 
tax"* charge 



Oil 
export 
charges 



Excise 
tax- 
Gasoline 



Natural 

gas 
and gas 
liquids 

tax 



Other 

excise 

taxes and 

duties and 

other tax 

revenue 



Non-tax 
revenue Total 



914 


302 


89 


335 


216 


96 


89 




7 


6 


1 


25 


248 


2.328 


2,680 


567 


61 


632 


369 


120 


145 


116 


26 


29 


-8 


142 


346 


5.225 


1,528 


604 


50 


563 


293 


126 


148 


13 


39 


32 




59 


643 


4,098 


2,647 


828 


92 


719 


371 


131 


254 


-1 


47 


38 


1 


77 


577 


5,781 


2,245 


553 


77 


650 


324 


103 


153 


132 


30 


35 


-to 


118 


495 


4.905 


2,503 


541 


46 


556 


321 


119 


177 


80 


31 


41 




61 


551 


5.027 


2,940 


557 


96 


724 


381 


138 


200 


73 


29 


44 




89 


278 


5.549 


2,866 


431 


101 


635 


341 


153 


199 


62 


39 


30 




71 


454 


5.382 


2.515 


686 


65 


689 


257 


122 


160 


73 


43 


45 


- 1 


44 


831 


5,529 


3,552 


635 


181 


742 


301 


121 


221 


74 


39 


35 


1 


66 


463 


6,431 


2,353 


607 


96 


557 


268 


93 


239 


83 


37 


30 




98 


160 


4,621 


1,489 


2,629 


62 


682 


316 


95 


377 


30 


27 


27 


1 


50 


971 


6,756 


1,022 


439 


5 


245 ■ 


38 


45 


201 


115 


14 


12 


- 1 


57 


313 


2,505 



1,021 7,729 3,796 1.462 2,563 



850 



408 



404 



16 



957 6,330 64.137 



4 



I 



SECTION 



6 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Budgetary Expenditure 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Budgetary expenditure 6.2 

By function ^.2 

By envelope (.4 

By standard object 6.6 

By program 6.7 

By type 6.9 

Supplementary statements — 

Public debt charges 6.1 2 

Expenditure under statutory authority 6.12 

Monthly expenditure by major spending department 6.14 



6'2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 

Budgetary expenditure consists of all charges to budgetary 
appropriations which affect the annual deficit or surplus of the 
Government. Such charges include those for work performed, 
goods received, services rendered, and transfer payments 
made, during the year, and, expenditure internal to the 
Government. 

Expenditure excludes amounts charged to the Canada Pen- 
sion Plan Account, the Unemployment Insurance Account 
except for benefits to fishermen, superannuation accounts, 
other specified purpose accounts, and other liability accounts. 

In this section, expenditure is analysed in several different 
ways: 

— by function, i.e. broad policies; 

— by envelope, i.e. policy sector; 



— by standard object, i.e. productive resources acquired or 
transfer payments made; 

— by program, i.e. purpose; and, 

— by type, i.e. operating, capital, and grants and 
contributions. 

Expenditure by Function 

The functional presentation of expenditure reflects the 
broad policies pursued by the Government. These functions, 
which are reflected in Table 6.1, are primarily services pro- 
vided to the people of Canada or to other governmental 
jurisdictions within Canada. 

The largest category of expenditure under the functional 
classification is health and welfare, which accounted for 
$31,357 million, or 31% of total net expenditure. 



EXPENDITURE BY MAJOR FUNCTION 

"Five year comparative summary" 
Millions of dollars 



100,254 100% 



58,796 100% 



: 6,082 : 



;; 2,525 / 



8,377 



: 8,929 :• 



18,553 




14% 

11% 
4% 

15% 

32% 

6% 
18% 



?3,227 / 



: 7,037 > 



67,474 100% 
14% 



9,512 



7,169 I 



20,968 



E 4,393 




11% 
5% 

10% 



31% 



7% 



22% 



78,276 100% 



18,2771 



1.3,477;; 



10,337 



:• 9,363 > 



24,630 



= 5,221 




13% 

11% 

4% 

12% 



31% 



7% 



22% 



88,615 100% 



11,743 



9,362 






'10,473; 



28 



604 



=5,449= 




13% 



11% 



5% 



12% 



32% 



6% 



21% 



jJ 4,928 ^ 

•-• • • 



• • • • • 
■••••' 

•.'12,307 

• • • • • 

T • • • • 

• • • • 

. J • • • • 

• ••••• 

• • • • r 



13,119 



10,388 



31,357 





13% ALL OTHER FUNCTIONS 



10% DEFENCE 



5% 



12% 



TRANSPORTATION AND 
COMMUNICATIONS 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
AND SUPPORT 



310A HEALTH AND WELFARE 



=5,604= 6% FISCAL TRANSFER PAYMENTS 



^22,55K 23% PUBLIC DEBT(I) 



1981 



1982 



1983 



1984 



(1) Includes additional interest in respect of the Public Service, the Canadian Forces 
and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police superannuation accounts. 



1985 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 
TABLE 6.1 



6*3 



EXPENDITURE BY FUNCTION 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



Increase 
or 
1983-84 decrease (-) 



Increase 



General Government services — 
Legislation and administration — 

Legislative 

Executive 

Collection of taxes and duties .. 

National capital region 

Other legislation and adminis- 
tration 

Protection of persons and proper- 
ty- 
Justice 

Correctional service 

Police protection 

Consumer services 

Other protection of persons and 
property 



Foreign affairs — 
External relations — 

Diplomatic relations 490 

Contributions to international 

organizations 109 

599 
Assistance to developing coun- 
tries 1,474 

Defence — 

Defence services 

Veterans benefits 



Transportation and communica- 
tions — 

Air transport 

Water transport 

Road transport 

Postal services 

Telecommunications 

Other transportation and com- 
munications 



Economic development and sup- 
port — 
Primary industry — 

Agriculture 1,488 

Fisheries, forestry and water 

resources 1,102 

Energy 4,195 

Other primary industry 76 

6.861 

Secondary industry 163 

Foreign trade 153 

Labour force — 

Working conditions 65 

Training 905 

Immigration 141 

Other labour force 1,008 

2.119 



328 


222 


106 


216 


183 


33 


1,075 


984 


91 


97 


86 


11 


538 


512 


26 


2.254 


1.987 


267 


123 


no 


13 


794 


694 


100 


836 


802 


34 


79 


75 


4 


29 


28 


1 


1.861 


1.709 


152 


4,115 


3,696 


419 



416 

113 
529 

1,221 



1,409 



74 



-4 
70 



253 



2,073 


1,750 


323 


8,929 


7,974 


955 


1,459 


1,388 


71 


10,388 


9,362 


1.026 


1,249 


1,433 


-184 


839 


615 


224 


234 


264 


-30 


516 


483 


33 


166 


158 


8 


1,924 


1,885 


39 


4,928 


4,838 


90 



79 



920 


182 


3,127 


1.068 


66 


10 


5.522 


1.339 


210 


-47 


134 


19 


61 


4 


972 


-67 


132 


9 


695 


313 


1.860 


259 



General research — 

Social science research 

Physical science research 

Regional development 

Other economic development and 
support 



Health and welfare — 
Health- 
Public health 

Medical care 

Hospital care 

Other health 

Income maintenance — 

Payments to aged 

Payments to families 

Payments to unemployed 

Social assistance — 
Canada Assistance Plan and 

related items 

Other social assistance 

Indians and Inuit 

Housing and urban renewal 

Other health and welfare 

Education assistance — 

Post-secondary education 

Other education 



Culture and recreation — 
Archives, galleries, theatres, etc .. 
Parks, historic sites and other 

recreational areas 

Film, radio and television 

Other culture and recreation 



Fiscal transfer payments — 
Statutory subsidies to provincial 

governments 

Revenue equalization payments... 
Other fiscal transfer payments 

Public debt 

Internal overhead expenses — 

Government support services 

Contributions to employee pen- 
sion and medical plans 

ToUl net expenditure 100,254 



1984-85 


1983-84 


decrease ( - ) 


279 


258 


21 


1.097 


954 


143 


1.376 


1.212 


164 


1,427 


1,248 


179 


208 


287 


-79 


12,307 


10.473 


1,834 


169 


167 


2 


157 


140 


17 


6,343 


5.575 


768 


63 


61 


2 


6.732 


5.943 


789 


11.417 


10,406 


1.011 


2.418 


2,327 


91 


2.989 


3,051 


-62 


16.824 


15.784 


1.040 


3.759 


3.383 


376 


91 


90 


1 


3.850 


3.473 


377 


1,938 


1,752 


186 


1,965 


1.604 


361 


48 


48 




31,357 


28.604 


2,753 


2,492 


2,252 


240 


204 


198 


6 


2,696 


2,450 


246 



158 



150 



311 
991 

543 


312 
897 
450 


-1 
94 
93 


2.003 


1,809 


194 


36 

5,489 

79 


36 
5,438 

-25 


SI 
104 


5,604 


5,449 


155 


22.551 


18,146 


4.405 


1,996 
236 


1,807 
231 


189 
5 


2,232 


2.038 


194 



88.615 



11,639 



6'* 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Expenditure by Envelope 

Table 6.2 presents expenditure by envelope reflecting the 
broad policy sectors of the Government. The table is presented 
on both a gross and net basis and segregates expenditure with 
outside parties from expenditure internal to the Government. 



The difference between gross and net expenditure is revenue 
credited to appropriations. Other tables in this section provide 
additional details for total net expenditure (with outside par- 
ties and internal to the Government). 



TABLE 6.2 

BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE BY ENVELOPE AND SOURCE 
(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



Gross 
expenditure 

Internal 
With to the 

outside Govern- 
parties ment Total^^' 

Social development — 

Old age security benefits, guaranteed 
income supplements and spouses' 
allowances 11,418 11,418 

Family allowances 2,418 2,418 

Canada Assistance Plan 3,635 3,635 

Government contribution to the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Account 2,788 2,788 

Established programs fmancing — 
Insurance and medical care services .. 6,330 6,330 

Education support 2,492 2,492 

Other 14,933 58 14,991 

44.014 58 44.072 

Economic and regional development 16,589 383 16,972 

Fiscal arrangements 6,085 6,085 

External affairs and aid 2,135 2 2,137 

Defence 9,051 146 9,197 

Parliament and services to Government .... 4,289 1,538 5,827 

Total program expenditure 82,163 2,127 84,290 

Public debt 22,537 14 22.551 

Total expenditure 104,700 2,141 106.841 

<■) Less than $500,000. 

(^) Reflected on the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure in Section 2 of this volume. 

(^) Additional details by envelope are shown in Table 4. 1 (Section 4 of this volume). 



Revenue credited 




Net 


to appropriations 




expenditure 


Internal 




Internal 


From to the 


With 


to the 


outside Govern- 


outside 


Govern- 


parties ment 


parties 


ment Total"'*" 







11,418 




11,418 






2,418 




2,418 






3,635 




3,635 






2,788 




2,788 






6,330 




6,330 






2,492 




2,492 


1,313 


46 


13,620 


12 


13,632 


1.313 


46 


42.701 


12 


42.713 


2,790 


355 


13,799 
6,085 


28 


13,827 
6,085 


20 


(1) 


2,115 


2 


2,117 


259 


12 


8,792 


134 


8,926 


274 


1,518 


4,015 


20 


4,035 


4,656 


1,931 


77,507 


196 


77,703 






22.537 


14 


22,551 



4,656 



1,931 



100,044 



210 100,254 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 



6*5 











1983-84 












Gross 
expenditure 




Revenue credited 
to appropriations 




Net 
expenditure 




Increase or 


With 
outside 
parties 


Internal 
to the 

Govern- 
ment 


Total<2> 


From 
outside 
parties 


Internal 
to the 

Govern- 
ment 


With 
outside 
parties 


Internal 
to the 

Govern- 
ment 


Total<2'<" 


decrease ( - ) 

in total 

net 

expenditure 



10,406 




10,406 






10,406 




10,406 


1,012 


2.326 




2,326 






2,326 




2,326 


92 


3,288 




3,288 






3,288 




3,288 


347 


2,714 




2,714 






2,714 




2,714 


74 


5,564 




5,564 






5,564 




5,564 


766 


2,252 




2,252 






2,252 




2,252 


240 


13,544 


54 


13,598 


1,202 


46 


12,342 


8 


12,350 


1,282 


40,094 


54 


40,148 


1.202 


46 


38.892 


8 


38,900 


3.813 


14,578 


364 


14,942 


2,276 


339 


12,302 


25 


12,327 


1,500 


5,878 




5,878 






5,878 




5,878 


207 


1,781 


1 


1,782 


18 




1,763 


1 


1,764 


353 


8,179 


105 


8,284 


306 


6 


7,873 


99 


7,972 


954 


3,934 


1,212 


5,146 


330 


1,188 


3,604 


24 


3,628 


407 


74,444 


1,736 


76,180 


4,132 


1,579 


70,312 


157 


70,469 


7,234 


18,144 


2 


18,146 






18,144 


2 


18,146 


4,405 


92,588 


1,738 


94,326 


4,132 


1,579 


88,456 


159 


88,615 


11,639 



6-6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Expenditure by Standard Object 

The standard object presentation of expenditure is related to 
the goods and services acquired, and transfer payments made, 
by the Government. 

A comparative summary of expenditure by standard object 
is presented in Table 6.3. Additional details are given in 
Volume II. 

Grants, contributions and other transfer payments were the 
largest category, and accounted for $49,190 million or 49% of 
total net expenditure. Payments included fiscal transfer pay- 
ments to provinces, $5,521 million; payments under the Public 
Utilities Income Tax Act, $293 million; payments for insured 
health services and extended health care, $6,330 million; 



family allowance payments, $2,418 million; guaranteed 
income payments, $2,953 million; spouse's allowance pay- 
ments, $249 million; old age security payments, $8,216 mil- 
lion; Canada Assistance Plan payments, $3,635 million; and, 
post-secondary education payments, $2,265 million. 

Salaries and wages accounted for $10,789 million or 1 1% of 
total net expenditure. The increase of $681 million was due 
mainly to higher salary rates. 



Public debt charges totalled $22,551 million or 22% of total 
net expenditure. The increase of $4,405 million was due 
mainly to an increase in unmatured debt. 



TABLE 6.3 

EXPENDITURE BY STANDARD OBJECT 

(in millions of dollars) 



Salaries and wages (1) 

Other personnel costs (1) 

Transportation and communications (2) 

Information (3) 

Professional and special services (4) 

Rentals (5) 

Purchased repair and upkeep (6) 

Utilities, materials and supplies (7) 

Construction and acquisition of land, buildings and works (8) 

Construction and acquisition of machinery and equipment (9) 

Grants, contributions and other transfer payments (10) 

Public debt charges (11) 

All other expenditure (12) 

Total standard objects (1-12) 

Less: revenues credited to the votes (13) 

Total net expenditure 

Details can be found in the Introduction (Table 3) and in the departmental sections of Volume II. 







Increase 








or 






1983-84 


decrease ( - 


) 


1984-85 


Amount 


% 


10.789 


10.108 


681 


7 


2,119 


1.985 


134 


7 


1,516 


1.397 


119 


9 


358 


290 


68 


23 


2,561 


2.506 


55 


2 


845 


741 


104 


14 


1,011 


894 


117 


13 


2.241 


2.151 


90 


4 


1.503 


1.179 


324 


27 


3,307 


2.386 


921 


39 


49.190 


43.913 


5,277 


12 


22.551 


18.146 


4,405 


24 


8.850 


8.629 


221 


3 


106.841 


94.325 


12.516 


13 


6.587 


5.710 


877 


15 



100.254 



88.615 



11.639 



13 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 



6'7 



Expenditure by Program 

The programs of each department and agency identify the 
major objectives of the department. 

TABLE 6.4 

EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAM 
(in millions of dollars) 



A comparative summary of expenditure by program is 
provided in table 6.4. 



Increase 
or 
1984-85 1983-84 decrease (-) 



AGRICULTURE— 

Department — 

Administration 

Agri-food development 

Agri-food regulation and 

inspection 

Race track supervision 

revolving fund 

Canadian Forestry Service 

Canadian Grain Commission... 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board .. 
Canagrex 



COMMUNICATIONS- 
DC partment — 
Communications and culture ... . 253 

Government Telecommuni- 
cations Agency revolving 

fund - I 

252 

Canada Council 73 

Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion 905 

Canadian Film Development 

Corporation 46 

Canadian Radio-television and 
Telecommunications Commis- 
sion 25 

National Arts Centre Corpora- 
tion 15 

National Film Board 61 

National Film Board revolving 

fund (') 

National Library 30 

National Museums of Canada 74 

Public Archives 39 

~l.520 

CONSUMER AND CORPO- 
RATE AFFAIRS— 

Department 194 

Restrictive Trade Practices Com- 
mission 

Standards Council of Canada 

ECONOMIC AND REGIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMI- 
GRATION— 

Department — 

Departmental administration... 
Canada Employment and Immi- 
gration Commission — 

Administration 

Employment and insurance 

Immigration 

Annuities 

Immigration Appeal Board 



57 


52 


5 


1.137 


956 


181 


205 


190 


15 


-1 

127 


-1 
136 


-9 


38 


37 


1 


1.563 


1.370 


193 


6 


5 


1 


19 


17 


2 


5 


1 


4 


1,593 


1,393 


200 



239 

1 

240 

66 

816 

16 

24 



1,369 



262 



14 

-2 

12 

7 

89 

30 



14 


1 


57 


4 


(1) 




30 




69 


5 


37 


2 



151 



-68 



1 

7 


1 
6 


1 


202 


269 


-67 


6 


20 


-14 



-I 



42 


38 


4 


4,809 


4,647 


162 


128 


119 


9 


3 


3 




4.982 


4.807 


175 


4 


4 




4,994 


4,820 


174 



1984-85 



ENERGY, MINES AND 
RESOURCES- 
DC partment — 

Administration 27 

Energy 3.813 

Environmental studies 

revolving fund -2 

Minerals and earth sciences 290 

4.128 

Atomic Energy Control Board 20 

Atomic Energy of Canada 

Limited 326 

National Energy Board 24 

Petro-Canada 17 

Petro-Canada International 
Assistance Corporation 60 

ENVIRONMENT- 
DC partment — 

Administration 

Environmental services 

Parks Canada 

National Battlefields Commission 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS— 

Department — 

Canadian interests abroad 726 

Passport Office revolving 

fund 

Grains and oilseeds 

World exhibitions 

Canadian Commercial Corpora- 
tion 

Canadian International Develop- 
ment Agency 

Export Development Corporation 

International Development 
Research Centre 

International Joint Commission.... 



FINANCE— 
Department — 
Financial and economic poli- 
cies 90 

Public debt 22,551 

Fiscal transfer payments 5,813 

Canadian Import Tribunal 2 

Inspector general of banks 2 

Special <" 

28.458 

Auditor General 40 

Insurance 13 

Tariff Board 3 

~28,5I4 

FISHERIES AND OCEANS 721 

GOVERNOR GENERAL 6 



1983-84 



21 
2,738 

-2 

246 

3.003 

19 

336 
23 
12 

65 



630 



23,918 



Increase 

or 

decrease ( - ) 



6 

1,075 



44 

1.125 

1 

-10 
1 
5 

-5 



4,575 


3,458 


1.117 


49 

459 

310 

818 

1 


45 
405 
312 
762 


4 
54 
-2 
56 

1 


819 


762 


57 



96 



-3 

138 

10 

871 


-2 

152 

4 

784 


-1 

- 14 

6 

87 


17 


17 




1,333 


1,089 
12 


244 
-12 


81 

3 


67 
3 


14 


2,305 


1,972 


333 



69 

18,146 

5,647 

2 


21 

4.405 

166 


1 

(1) 


1 


23.865 

38 

13 

2 


4.593 
2 

1 



4,596 



609 



112 



6*8 
TABLE 6.4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAM— Continued 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



INDIAN AFFAIRS AND 
NORTHERN DEVELOP- 
MENT— 
Department — 

Administration 50 

Indian and Inuit affairs 1,488 

Northern affairs 651 

Environmental studies 

revolving fund - 1 

Native claims 63 

2.251 
Northern Canada Power Com- 
mission 

2,251 

JUSTICE— 

Department — 
Administration of Justice 134 

Canadian Human Rights Com- 
mission 9 

Commissioner for Federal Judi- 
cial Affairs 89 

Federal Court of Canada 8 

Law Reform Commission of 
Canada 5 

OfHces of the Information and 
Privacy Commissioners of 
Canada 3 

Supreme Court of Canada 6 

Tax Court of Canada 3 

LABOUR— 

Department 

Canada Labour Relations Board.. 

Canada Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation 

Canadian Centre for Occupation- 
al Health and Safety 

NATIONAL DEFENCE— 

Defence services 

Defence Construction (1951) 
Limited 



NATIONAL HEALTH AND 
WELFARE— 
Department — 
Departmental administration... 

Health and social services 

Medical services 

Health protection 

Income security 

Fitness and amateur sport 

XV Olympic winter games 

Medical Research Council 

NATIONAL REVENUE— 
Customs and Excise 

Taxation 

Canada Post Corporation 

PARLIAMENT— 

The Senate 

House of Commons 

Library of Parliament 



Increase 
or 
1983-84 decrease (-) 



51 

1,387 

595 

-1 

20 

2,052 

(I) 



2,052 



-1 

101 

56 



43 
199 



199 



109 


25 


8 


1 


82 

7 


7 

I 



257 


219 


38 


129 
6 


105 

5 


24 

1 


1,965 


1,604 


361 


7 


5 


2 


2,107 


1,719 


388 


8,912 


7,959 


953 


14 


13 


1 


8,926 


7,972 


954 



45 


42 


3 


10.170 


9,022 


1,148 


377 


331 


46 


114 


106 


8 


13,905 


12,803 


1,102 


102 


69 


33 


44 


41 


3 


24.757 


22.414 


2.343 


157 


140 


17 


24,914 


22,554 


2,360 


409 


378 


31 


663 


604 


59 


516 


483 


33 


1,588 


1,465 


123 


26 


23 


3 


158 


145 


13 


10 


10 




194 


178 


16 



1984-85 



PRIVY COUNCIL— 

Department — 

Privy Council 

Special 

Canadian Intergovernmental 
Conference Secretariat 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Commissioner of Official Lan- 
guages 

Economic Council of Canada 

Public Service Staff Relations 
Board 



51 
1 

52 

3 
94 



174 



1,433 



REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL 

EXPANSION— 

Department 

Canadair Financial Corporation 
Inc 

Cape Breton Development Corpo- 
ration 

Federal Business Development 
Bank 

Foreign Investment Review 
Agency 

The de Havilland Aircraft of 
Canada, Limited 



SCIENCE AND TECHNO- 
LOGY— 

Ministry of State 

National Research Council of 
Canada — 
Scientific and industrial 

research 

Scientific and technical infor- 
mation 

Natural Sciences and Engineer- 
ing Research Council 

Science Council of Canada 



447 



21 
468 



Increase 
or 
1983-84 decrease (-) 



45 

5 

50 

2 
6 



83 



PUBLIC WORKS— 
Department — 

Administration 56 53 

Professional and technical ser- 
vices 57 55 

Construction services revolv- 
ing fund 4 2 

Accommodation 685 574 

Marine 27 20 

Transportation and other engi- 
neering 72 68 

Land management and de- 
velopment 161 143 

Municipal grants 274 233 

1.336 1.148 

National Capital Commission 97 86 



1,234 



376 



20 
396 



6 

-4 
2 

1 
88 



91 



3 

2 

2 

111 

7 



18 

41 

188 

II 



199 



1,070 


1,028 


42 


300 


550 


-250 


108 


110 


-2 


31 


78 


-47 


7 


6 


1 


150 


300 


-150 


1,666 


2,072 


-406 



-4 



71 



1 

72 



312 
5 


281 
5 


31 


792 


693 


99 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 
TABLE 6.4 



••9 



EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAM— Concluded 

(in millions of dollars) 



SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Department — 
Administration and regional 

operations 

Official languages 

Education support 

Citizenship and culture 

Advisory Council on the Status of 

Women 

Public Service Commission 

Staff development and training 

revolving fund 

Social Sciences and Humanities 

Research Council 

Status of Women — Office of the 

Co-ordinator 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

SOLICITOR GENERAL— 

Department **is».iHj 

Correctional Service 

National Parole Board 

Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police — 
Law enforcement 

SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 
Department — 

Services 

Supply 

Supply revolving fund 

Defence production revolving 

fund 

Canadian Unity Information 
Office 

Statistics Canada 







Increase 






or 


1984-85 


1983-84 


decrease ( - ) 


35 


30 


5 


313 


304 


9 


2,492 


2.252 


240 


203 


162 


41 


3.043 


2.748 


295 


2 


2 




114 


107 


7 




C^'.'-,/, 


Vi^i 


-1 


.i\ -m-x 


v»?;i.*. 


63 


60 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3.224 


2,918 


306 


3 


6 


-3 


Sjr 40 


28 


12 


740 


652 


88 


14 


14 




836 


802 


34 


1.630 


1,496 


134 


204 


195 


9 


22 


27 


-5 


-35 


10 


-45 


-3 


-1 


-2 


14 


20 


-6 


202 


251 


-49 


208 


190 


18 


410 


441 


-31 



1984-85 

TRANSPORI— 
Department — 
Departmental administration.... 

Stores revolving fund 

Marine transportation 

Air transportation 

Self-supporting airports and 
associated ground services 

revolving fund ,, 

Surface transportation 1,168 

Canadian Aviation Safety Board. 
Canadian Transport Commission 

Northern Pipeline Agency 

Office of the Grain TransporU 
tion Agency Administrator 



TREASURY BOARD— 
Secretariat — 
Central administration of the 

public service 

Employer contributions to in- 
surance plans 

Temporary assignments 

Comptroller General 



Increase 
or 
1983-84 decrease ( - ) 



130 

1 


117 
(1) 


13 
1 


812 


595 


217 


775 


552 


223 


19 


31 


-12 


1,168 


1,495 


-327 


2.905 


2.790 


115 


5 




5 


786 


469 


317 


4 
I 


6 


-2 

1 


3,701 


3,265 


436 



56 

202 

I 

259 

II 



VETERANS AFFAIRS— 

Veterans affairs 

War Veterans Allowance Board 

Pensions 

Bureau of pensions advocates 

Total net expenditure 



52 

201 

1 

254 

11 



<" Less than $500,000. 



270 


265 


5 


764 
1 

689 
5 


719 
1 

664 
4 


45 

25 
1 


1.459 


1.388 


71 


100.254 


88.615 


11,639 



Expenditure by Type 

Expenditure may be classified under three major types: 
operating, capital, and grants and contributions. Operating 
expenditures consist of expenditures incurred in conducting the 
administrative and operating activities of the program; capital 
expenditures are for the construction and acquisition of fixed 



assets; grants and contributions represent payments for other 
than goods and services, made for the purpose of furthering 
program objectives. 

A comparative summary of expenditure by tyjje is presented 
in Table 6.5. 



TABLE 6.5 

EXPENDITURE BY TYPE 

(in thousands of dollars) 



AGRICULTURE— 

Department 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board 
Canagrex 



Operating 


Capital 




Grants and 
contributions 


Total 




1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


602,145 
5,780 
1.308 
5.400 

614,633 


567.496 

5.410 

1.251 

700 

574.857 


115.667 
197 
48 

115,912 


60,513 
65 
50 

60,628 


845.103 

17.302 

862,405 


742.232 

15.485 

757,717 


1,562,915 

5,977 

18,658 

5,400 

1.592,950 


1.370,241 

5.475 

16,786 

700 

1.393.202 



6M0 
TABLE 6.5 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



EXPENDITURE BY TYPE— Continued 

(in thousands of dollars) 



Operating 



1984-85 



1983-84 



COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department 181,213 174,931 

Canada Council 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 904,927 815,971 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 45,571 16,263 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications 

Commission 25,026 23,088 

National Arts Centre Corporation 14,932 14,427 

National Film Board 58,042 54,169 

National Library 29,656 29,114 

National Museums of Canada 62,389 55,896 

Public Archives 36,583 34,790 

1.358.339 1.218.649 

CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS— 

Department 129,778 131,355 

Restrictive Trade Practices Commission 1,392 1 ,505 

Standards Council of Canada 

131.170 132.860 

ECONOMIC AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT... 6,137 19,006 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION— 

Department 7,734 8,418 

Canada Employment and Immigration Commission.... 3,567,224 3,491,245 

Immigration Appeal Board 4,568 3,483 

3.579.526 3.503.146 

ENERGY, MINES AND RESOURCES— 

Department - 1,815,658 - 1,404,607 

Atomic Energy Control Board 19,788 18,058 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 294,436 306,307 

National Energy Board 23,797 22,419 

Petro-Canada 17,040 1 1,800 

Petro-Canada International Assistance Corporation... 60,500 65,000 

- 1.400.097 - 981.023 

ENVIRONMENT— 

Department 603,426 557,714 

National Battlefields Commission 800 

604.226 557.714 

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS— 

Department 632,803 578,094 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 17,617 17,168 

Canadian International Development Agency 72,021 60,695 

Export Development Corporation 1 1,848 

International Development Research Centre 

International Joint Commission 2,913 2,970 

725.354 670.775 

FINANCE— 

Department 22,641,235 18,217,268 

Auditor General 38,309 36,433 

Insurance 12,922 13,237 

Tariff Board 2,742 2,095 

22.695.208 18,269.033 

FISHERIES AND OCEANS 480,625 438.322 

GOVERNOR GENERAL 5,604 4,973 

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOP- 
MENT— 

Department 392,136 518.586 

Northern Canada Power Commission 50 

392.136 518.636 
JUSTICE— 

Department 75.873 68.152 

Canadian Human Rights Commission 8,501 6,977 

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 74,046 68,330 

Federal Court of Canada 7,566 6,560 

Law Reform Commission of Canada 4,993 4,746 

Offices of the Information and Privacy Commission- 
ers of Canada 2,382 1,228 

Supreme Court of Canada 5,351 4,668 

Tax Court of Canada 2,558 1,653 

181.270 162.314 
LABOUR— 

Department 74,739 69,098 

Canada Labour Relations Board 5,644 5,437 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation l,965[o63 1, 604^324 

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 3,910 

2.049.356 1.678.859 







Grants and 






Capital 


contributions 


Total 


1 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


25,295 


24.314 


45,455 


40,511 


251.963 


239,756 






72,614 


65,581 


72.614 

904.927 

45.571 


65,581 

815,971 

16,263 


225 


419 




70 


25.251 
14,932 


23,577 
14,427 


3,168 


2,822 


277 


565 


61,487 


57,556 


471 


479 


37 


28 


30,164 


29,621 


2,766 


2,336 


8,568 


10,682 


73,723 


68.914 


2,669 


1,650 




529 


39,252 


36,969 


34.594 


32.020 


126.951 


117.966 


1.519.884 


1.368.635 


5,768 


5,141 


58,205 


125,265 


193,751 


261,761 


6 


2 






1,398 


1,507 






6,612 


5,978 


6,612 


5,978 


5.774 


5.143 


64.817 


131.243 


201.761 


269.246 


33 


412 


159 


395 


6,329 


19,813 


225 


453 






7.959 


8,871 


22.880 


16,436 


1,391,730 


1,299,599 


4,981,834 
4,568 


4,807,280 
3,483 


23.105 


16.889 


1.391.730 


1.299.599 


4.994.361 


4.819.634 


44,627 


35.232 


5.898,845 


4,372,497 


4,127,814 


3,003,122 


221 


318 


444 


281 


20,453 


18,657 


31,100 


30.010 






325,536 


336,317 


246 


300 






24,043 
17,040 
60,500 


22,719 
11,800 
65,000 


76.194 


65.860 


5.899.289 


4.372.778 


4.575.386 


3.457.615 


142,409 


147.648 


72,372 


56,349 


818,207 


761,711 


14 








814 




142.423 


147.648 


72.372 


56.349 


819.021 


761.711 


70,461 


48.731 


167,782 


156,790 


871.046 
17,617 


783,615 
17,168 


2,079 


1.027 


1,258.820 


1,027,550 


1,332,920 


1,089,272 
1 1 .848 






81.000 


67.400 


81,000 


67,400 


17 


16 






2,930 


2,986 


72.557 


49.774 


1.507.602 


1.251.740 


2.305.513 


1.972.289 


3.320 


1,204 


5,813,601 


5.646.842 


28.458,156 


23,865,314 


1.060 


742 


358 


337 


39.727 


37,512 


76 


213 






12.998 


13,450 


35 


16 






2,777 


2,111 


4.491 


2.175 


5.813.959 


5.647.179 


28.513.658 


23.918.387 


205.363 


142,847 


34,780 


27.868 


720,768 


609.037 


196 


98 






5,800 


5.071 



91,204 
91.204 

1,453 

261 

15 

792 

54 

61 

367 

491 

3.494 

604 
35 

1,639 
2.278 



91,138 1,767,720 1,441,707 2,251,060 2,051,431 

50 
91.138 1.767.720 1.441.707 2.251.060 2.051.481 



1,711 

391 

II 

215 

31 

140 

113 

182 

2.794 

508 
35 



543 



57,043 
15,188 

552 
72.783 
54,21 1 



1,467 
55.678 



39,336 
14.011 



491 

19 

53.857 

35.031 



4,803 
39.834 



134,369 

8,762 

89.249 

8.358 

5,047 

2,443 

6,270 

3,049 

257.547 

129,554 

5,679 

1,965,063 

7,016 

2.107.312 



109,199 

7,368 

82,352 

6,775 

4,777 

1,368 

5,272 

1,854 

218.965 

104,637 
5.472 

1,604,324 
4,803 

1.719.236 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 
TABLE 6.5 



6'll 



EXPENDITURE BY TYPE— Concluded 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Operating 



Capital 



Grants and 
contributions 



Total 



1984-85 



1983-84 



1984-85 



1983-84 



1984-85 



1983-84 



1984-85 



1983-84 



NATIONAL DEFENCE 6.013,503 5,644.458 2,567 284 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE— 

Department 576,499 510,390 50,726 

Medical Research Council 3,546 2 909 63 

580.045 513.299 50.789 

NATIONAL REVENUE— 

Customs and Excise 397,412 371,336 

Taxation 646,249 587i385 

Canada Post Corporation 515.831 483,009 

1.559.492 1.441.730 

PARLIAMENT— 

The Senate 24,834 21,580 

House of Commons 148,868 137,748 

Library of Parliament 10,026 9,3 1 1 

183.728 168.639 
PRIVY COUNCIL— 

Department 49,045 43,387 

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat .. 2,406 1,885 

Chief Electoral Officer 78.320 6,01 1 

Commissioner of Official Languages 9.149 8.665 

Economic Council of Canada 8.138 8.01 1 

Public Service Staff Relations Board 8.184 7.806 

155.242 75.765 

PUBLIC WORKS— 

Department 448,012 712,390 

National Capital Commission 97.055 86,550 

545.067 798.940 

REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION— 

Department 230.970 201.596 

Canadair Financial Corporation Inc 300.000 550.000 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 107,573 110.194 

Federal Business Development Bank 31.108 77.883 

Foreign Investment Review Agency 6.697 6.350 

The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada. Limited 150.000 300.000 

826.348 1.246.023 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY— 

Ministry of State 5,302 8.681 

National Research Council of Canada 254,793 228,814 

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council .. 11,032 6,567 

Science Council of Canada 4,765 4,551 

275.892 248.613 

SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Department 169,312 156.891 

Advisory Council on the Status of Women 2,384 2,161 

Public Service Commission 110.053 104.278 

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council 5,851 5,655 

Status of Women— Office of the Co-ordinator 2.998 1.669 

290.598 270.654 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 2.668 6.253 

SOLICITOR GENERAL— 

Department 21.894 19.136 

Correctional Service 606.119 536.215 

National Parole Board 13.692 12.755 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 731.750 715,121 

1,373.455 1.283.227 
SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 

Department 187.922 239.264 

Statistics Canada 198.416 184.220 

386.338 423.484 
TRANSPORT— 

Department 1,640.649 1,639.909 

Canadian Aviation Safety Board 4.445 

Canadian Transport Commission 42.960 39.115 

Northern Pipeline Agency 3.524 5.406 

Office of the Grain Transportation Agency Adminis- 
trator 1.130 

1.692.708 1.684.430 
TREASURY BOARD— 

Secretariat 257.573 253.323 

Comptroller General 10.857 10,803 

268.430 264.126 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 294,626 284.002 

Total net expenditure 45.871,627 41,121,764 



11,130 
16,915 

28.045 

468 
7,874 

156 
8.498 

1,758 

7 

105 

218 

117 

67 

2.272 

601,410 

601.410 

2,840 



66 

2.906 

62 
104,551 

32 
104.645 

2,339 

7 

3,204 

87 
5.637 

19 

1,055 

132,464 

281 

90,901 

224.701 

13,105 

9,390 

22.495 

790,344 
930 
685 



211 
792.170 

643 

643 

3,253 



1.973,230 

50,216 

217 
50.433 

7,012 
16,446 

23.458 

734 
6,265 

114 
7.113 

1,032 

7 

81 

175 

53 

49 

1.397 

186,545 

186.545 

3,378 



18 

3.396 

58 
76,254 

31 
76.343 

1,665 

13 

1,315 

77 
3.070 

201 

336 

114,675 

1,050 

73,816 

189.877 

12,231 

4,954 

17.185 

426,401 

546 



345.351 354,553 8,926.138 7.972.241 



72 

72 
3.052 



24,129,694 21,853,018 

153.191 137.313 

24.282.885 21.990.331 



47 
47 

710 
1.023 

1.733 

1.199 

1 5.069 



15 

836.602 

1,895 
108,615 
300,527 



17,322 
1,306 

13,226 
31.854 

1,198 

247 

1.445 

473,723 

742,753 



563 

563 
1,161.125 



45 

45 

740 
1.002 

1.742 

5.662 

149 



16.268 5.811 

286.567 248.803 

286.567 248.803 

836,587 822.572 



40 

822.612 

2.430 

91,436 

274,621 



411.037 368.487 

2,871.014 2,589,825 

57,009 54,429 

2.928.023 2.644.254 



8.677 
1.029 

12.801 
22.507 

65 
410 

475 

723,820 
429,484 



426.955 1.216.476 1.153.304 



607 

4 

611 

1,101,195 



24,756.919 

1 56.800 

24.913.719 

408,542 

663,211 

515,831 

1.587,584 

26,012 
157,765 

10,182 
193.959 

52.002 
2.413 

93.494 

9,367 

8.255 

8,251 

173,782 

1,335,989 

97.055 

1,433.044 

1,070.397 

300,000 

107,573 

31,108 

6,778 

150,000 

1.665.856 

7,259 
467,959 
311,559 

4,797 
791.574 

3,042,665 

2,391 

113.257 

62.860 

3.085 

3,224.258 

2,687 

40,271 
739,889 

13,973 

835,877 

1.630.010 

202,225 
208,053 
410.278 

2.904,716 

5,375 

786,398 

3.524 

1.341 
3.701.354 

258.779 

10.857 

269.636 

1.459.004 



22,413,624 

140.439 

22,554.063 

378.348 

603,876 

483.009 

1.465.233 

23.054 

145.015 

9.425 

177.494 

50.081 
1,892 
6.241 
8,840 
8.064 
7.855 

82.973 

1.147.738 

86.550 

1.234.288 

1.027,546 

550.000 

110,194 

77.883 

6,408 

300.000 

2.072.031 

11.169 

396.504 

281.188 

4.582 

693.443 

2.748.381 

2.174 

105.593 

60.084 

1,746 

2.917.978 

6,454 

28.149 
651.919 

13.805 

801.738 

1.495.611 

251.560 
189.584 
441.144 

2,790.130 

469.145 
5.414 



3.264.689 

254.002 

10,807 

264.809 

1,388.249 



5.192.385 3.580,296 49,190.221 43.912.962 100.254.233 88.615,022 



6*12 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENTS 



Public Debt Charges 

Public debt charges include interest on unmatured debt 
(including Treasury bills) and on specified purpose accounts, 
cost of issuing new loans, amortization of bond discounts, 
premiums and commissions, and the costs of servicing the 
public debt. 

The increase of $3,832 million in public debt charges related 
to unmatured debt reflects mainly an increase in this debt, 



which rose from $143,160 million at March 31, 1984 to 
$172,898 million at March 31, 1985. The increase of $573 
million in public debt charges related to specified purpose 
accounts was due mainly to an increase in superannuation 
accounts. 

A comparative summary of public debt charges is presented 
in Table 6.6. Details can be found in Section 14 of this volume. 



TABLE 6.6 

PUBLIC DEBT CHARGES 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



Increase 
or 
1983-84 dccreasc(-) 



Unmatured debt — 
Marketable bonds — 

Payable in Canadian currency 7,544 6,183 1,361 

Payable in foreign currencies — 

United States dollars 

Deutsche marks 

Swiss francs 

Japanese yen 

Canada savings bonds 

Special non-marketable bonds — 

Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund 

Treasury bills 

Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies — 

United States dollars 

Swiss francs 

Japanese yen 

Servicing costs and costs of issuing new loans 

Total public debt charges related to unmatured debt 

Specified purpose accounts — 

Superannuation accounts 

Government Annuities Account 

Canada Pension Plan Account 

Deposit and trust accounts 

Other 

Total public debt charges related to specified purpose accounts 

Total public debt charges 22,551 18,146 4,405 



178 


187 


-9 


8 


23 


-15 


10 


6 


4 




10 


-10 


196 


226 


-30 


7.740 


6.409 


1.331 


4,818 


4,377 


441 


22 


19 


3 


5,216 


3,351 


1.865 


310 


174 


136 


41 


26 


15 


60 


27 


33 


411 


227 


184 


54 


46 


8 


18,261 


14,429 


3,832 


3,681 


3,268 


413 


75 


77 


-2 


151 


111 


40 


310 


233 


77 


73 


28 


45 


4.290 


3,717 


573 



Expenditure under Statutory Authority 

The spending authority provided by statutory appropriations 
is for specified purposes and for such amounts and such time 
as the acts prescribe. This spending authority does not general- 
ly lapse at the end of the year in which it is granted. Expendi- 
ture under such authority accounts for more than half of the 
total net expenditure each year. 



In 1984-85, expenditure under statutory authority amounted 
to $62,159 million, accounting for 62% of the total net expen- 
diture of $100,254 million. 

Table 6.7 presents a comparative summary of these statu- 
tory expenditures. 



BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 
TABLE 6.7 



6*13 



EXPENDITURE UNDER STATUTORY AUTHORITY 

(in millions of dollars) 




Public debt charges 

Old age security payments 

Contributions to the provinces for hospital insurance, medical care and extended health care 
under Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements and Established Programs Financing Act 

1977 " ; 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrangements and public utilities 

Payments to the provinces under the Canada Assistance Plan 

Guaranteed income supplement payments 

Government's contribution to the Unemployment Insurance Account 

Family allowance payments 

Post-secondary education payments to provinces 

Payments to railway companies of amounts determined pursuant to the provisions of the 
Western Grain Transportation Act 

Petroleum compensation 

Excess of expenditures over the revenues of the Canada Post Corporation 

Grants to municipalities and other taxing authorities 

Spouse's allowance payments 

Interest payments under the Canada Student Loans Act 

Contribution under the Crop Insurance Act 

Advances to the Mortgage Insurance Fund 

Contributions in respect of fishermens' benefits 

Payments in connection with the Western Grain Stabilization Act 

Expenses of elections 

Judges' salaries, allowances and annuities 

Payments to railway and transportation companies pursuant to the Railway Act 

Payments to railway and trucking companies of amounts determined pursuant to the 
provisions of the Atlantic Region Freight Assistance Act 

Ministers, Members of Parliament and Senators — Salaries and allowances 

Labour Adjustment Income Support Program 

Purchase of domestic coinage 

Payments of compensation respecting Public Service employees and merchant seamen 

Payments for the movement of grain re Western Grain Transportation Act 

Liabilities under the Small Businesses Loans Act 

Superannuation, supplementary retirement benefits, death benefits and other pensions — 
Public Service — 

Government's matching contribution to the Public Service Superannuation Account 373 

Statutory payments under the Supplementary Retirement Benefits Act 421 

Government's contribution as employer to the Unemployment Insurance Account 160 

Government's matching contribution to the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans 85 

Government's matching contribution to the Supplementary Retirement Benefits 

Account 70 

Government's matching contribution to the death benefit account 7 

Amortization of actuarial deficiency 356 

Less: interest applied against amortization of actuarial deficiency and charged as 

interest on the public debt 356 

recoveries from revolving funds 31 

Canadian Forces — 

Government's matching contribution to the Canadian Forces Superannuation Account .. 212 

Statutory payments under the Supplementary Retirement Benefits Act 236 

Government's contribution as employer to the Unemployment Insurance Account 53 

Government's matching contribution to the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans 28 

Government's matching contribution to the Supplementary Retirement Benefits 

Account 22 

Government's matching contribution to the death benefit account 2 

Amortization of actuarial deficiency 202 

Less: interest applied against amortization of actuarial deficiency and charged as 
interest on the public debt 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — 
Government's matching contribution to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superan- 
nuation Account 67 

Statutory payments under the Supplementary Retirement Benefits Act 19 

Government's contribution as employer to the Unemployment Insurance Account 1 1 

Government's matching contribution to the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans 6 

Government's matching contribution to the Supplementary Retirement Benefits 

Account 6 

Amortization of actuarial deficiency 19 

Less: interest applied against amortization of actuarial deficiency and charged as 
( interest on the public debt 

Payments under the Defence Services and Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension 

Continuation Act 

All other statutory expenditure 

Total 



1,472 



387 



755 
202 



128 



19 



22.551 
8,216 



6,330 
5,814 
3,635 
2.953 
2.788 
2.418 
2.265 

590 

438 

347 

272 

249 

207 

188 

172 

159 

117 

91 

86 

75 

56 
44 
42 
38 
33 
29 
29 



1.085 



553 



109 



18 
162 



62,159 



349 
380 

147 
79 

67 

7 

481 



481 
34 



1,510 



515 



200 

207 

48 

25 

21 

2 

259 



762 



259 



65 
17 
11 
6 

6 
22 



127 



22 



18.146 
7,649 



5.564 
5.647 
3,288 
2,524 
2.714 
2,327 
2.065 



483 
305 
231 
233 
179 
134 

140 

122 

3 

79 

359 

48 
41 
II 
23 
30 
141 
25 



995 



503 



105 



18 
247 



54,379 



4,405 
567 



766 
167 
347 
429 
74 
91 
200 

590 

-45 

42 

41 

16 

28 

54 

172 

19 

-5 

88 

7 

-284 

8 
3 
31 
15 
3 
-112 
4 



90 



50 



-85 



7,780 



6'14 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Monthly Expenditure by Major Spending 
Department 

Table 6.8 presents a summary of expenditure by month for 
1984-85. 

TABLE 6.8 

MONTHLY EXPENDITURE BY MAJOR SPENDING DEPARTMENT 

(in millions of dollars) 



Finance 

April, 1984 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1985 

February 

March 

Supplementary 

Total net expenditure 28,514 



Employ- 
National ment 
Health and 

and National Immigra- 
Welfare Defence tion 



Energy, 

Mines Secretary 

and of External 

Resources Transport State Affairs 



Indian 
Affairs 

and 
Northern 
Develop- 
ment 



Labour Other Total 



2,037 


1.942 


416 


262 


48 


213 


198 


146 


219 


67 


743 


6,291 


2,155 


1,904 


518 


418 


143 


316 


211 


136 


132 


75 


1.032 


7.040 


2,391 


1,977 


517 


440 


205 


310 


241 


105 


184 


129 


1.211 


7.710 


2,196 


1,972 


590 


435 


334 


220 


249 


162 


183 


95 


1.131 


7.567 


2,123 


1,977 


743 


373 


355 


344 


212 


160 


197 


122 


1.169 


7,775 


2,287 


2.036 


614 


352 


379 


185 


245 


138 


169 


102 


1.094 


7,601 


2,355 


2,025 


616 


391 


402 


297 


227 


199 


193 


113 


1,189 


8,007 


2,250 


2,087 


665 


382 


527 


329 


256 


175 


171 


78 


1.255 


8,175 


2,748 


2.014 


671 


322 


372 


203 


239 


179 


156 


517 


720 


8,141 


2,146 


2.117 


733 


398 


339 


271 


309 


185 


209 


284 


1,057 


8,048 


2,207 


2.228 


739 


442 


199 


294 


298 


237 


127 


143 


1,080 


7,994 


3,110 


2.527 


1,139 


494 


249 


220 


463 


227 


119 


153 


1,311 


10.012 


509 


108 


965 


285 


1,023 


499 


76 


256 


192 


229 


1.751 


5,893 



24,914 8,926 



4.994 



4.575 



3,701 



3,224 2.305 



2.251 



2.107 14.743 100.254 



SECTION 



7 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Loans, Inyestments 
and Advances 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Crown corporations 7.4 

Lending institutions 7.4 

All other 7.8 

Government of Canada financial interest in Crown corpora- 
tions 7.18 

Details of Government of Canada financial interest in Crown 

corporations 7.22 

Consolidation of Crown corporations with Government 7.23 

Financial assistance under budgetary appropriations to 

Crown corporations 7.25 

Contingent liabilities of Crown corporations 7.26 

Other- 
Provincial and territorial governments 7.27 

National governments including developing countries 7.32 

International organizations 7.35 

Veterans' Land Act Fund advances 7.38 

Joint and mixed enterprises 7.39 

Miscellaneous 7.41 

Allowance for valuation , 7.49 

Supplementary statement — 

Recorded uncollected interest 7.50 



I'l 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND 
ADVANCES 

Loans, investments and advances is a category of financial 
claims represented by debt instruments and ownership inter- 
ests held by the Government of Canada, acquired through the 
use of parliamentary appropriations. Some of these appropria- 
tions permit repayments to be used for further loans and 
advances. Many appropriations are non-lapsing, that is, unex- 
pended balances may be carried forward from year to year. 
Details of the use of non-budgetary appropriations, for loans, 
investments and advances, can be found in the departmental 
sections of Volume II. 

Loans, investments and advances are recorded at cost and 
are subject to valuation to reflect estimated losses on realiza- 
tion. Foreign currency transactions are translated and record- 
ed in Canadian currency equivalents at the exchange rates 
prevailing at the transaction dates. Loans, investments and 
advances resulting from foreign currency transactions are, in 
turn, reported at year-end closing rates of exchange; net gains 
are credited to revenue as premium and discount on exchange, 
while net losses are charged to budgetary expenditure of the 
Department of Finance. 

The allowance established to reflect estimated losses on 
realization of financial claims held by the Government has 
been authorized by the Minister of Finance and the President 
of the Treasury Board, under Section 54(2) (b) of the Finan- 
cial Administration Act. 

Revenue received during the year on loans, investments and 
advances, is credited to return on investments; details are given 
in Section 14 of this volume. In accordance with stated 



accounting policies, accrued interest and interest due but not 
received are not reported as revenue. Table 7.15 gives details 
of recorded uncollected interest. 

Transactions and year-end balances of loans, investments 
and advances are presented as follows: 

— Crown corporations; 

— provincial and territorial governments; 

— national governments including developing countries; 

— international organizations; 

— Veterans' Land Act Fund advances; 

— joint and mixed enterprises; and, 

— miscellaneous. 

Transactions and balances are further summarized in Sec- 
tions 1 and 2 of this volume. 

Some tables in this section present the continuity of 
accounts, by showing the opening and closing balances, as well 
as receipts and other credits, and payments and other charges, 
i.e. inflow and outflow of transactions. In addition, the term 
"account(s) without current transactions" has been included in 
some tables, to provide a link with figures published in the 
previous year's edition of the Public Accounts, and to show net 
transactions in accounts which were closed out in the previous 
year. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
TABLE 7.1 

LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7»3 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



Crown corporations — 
Lending institutions, Table 7.2 — 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corpora- 
tion 10,224,271,659 646,569,268 

Export Development Corporation 929,125,606 115,967,502 

Farm Credit Corporation 4,499,787,217 867,025,182 

Federal Business Development Bank 714,000,000 157,000,000 

16,367.184.482 1.786.561.952 

All other Crown corporations. Table 7.3 — 

Air Canada 574,847,172 18,158,908 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 833,218,657 38,133,569 

Canada Development Investment Corpora- 
tion 414,012,596 17,614,322 

Canadian National Railways 2,855,456,595 8,095,7! 1 

Petro-Canada 4,299,126,174 

Other 1,618,337,808 809,497,445 

10.594.999.002 891.499.955 

Total Crown corporations 26,962,183,484 2,678,061,907 

Other loans, investments and advances — 

Provincial and territorial governments. Table 

7.9 1,213,590,892 109,564,869 

National governments including developing 

countries. Table 7. 10 4,214,731,243 115,635,500 

International organizations. Table 7.1 1 3,306,239,559 1,421,832 

L«i5.- notes payable. Table 7.11 1,152,768,176 365,572,403 

2.153.471.383 366.994.235 

Veterans' Land Act Fund advances less allow- 
ance for conditional benefits. Table 7. 12 223,912,756 47,431,382 

Joint and mixed enterprises. Table 7.13 459,824,089 269,489 

Miscellaneous, Table 7.14 598,164,613 591,376,185 

Total other loans, investments and advances 8,863,694,976 1,231,271,660 

35,825,878,460 3,909,333,567 

L«5J. allowance for valuation 5,700,000,000 500,000,000 

Total 30,125,878,460 4,409,333,567 



40,000,000 

282,000,000 

76,553,550 

695,600,000 

1.094.153.550 



6,100,000 

837,604,304 
843.704.304 



40,000,000 

9,859,702,391 
889,711,654 

4,328,362,035 

557,000.000 

15.674.776.080 

556,688,264 
795,085,088 

396.398,274 

2,853,460,884 

4,299.126,174 

1,646,444,667 

10.547.203.351 



40.000,000 - 140,000,000 



- 364,569,268 
-39,413.952 

-171,425,182 

- 157,000,000 

- 692.408.402 

-18,158,908 
-38,133,569 

-17,614,322 
-1,995,711 

28,106,859 
-47.795.651 



- 193,382,011 

5.258,700 

378.233,772 

-172.000.000 

- 121.889.539 

- 16,908,864 

- 36,944.101 

-5.647.122 

61.617,879 

660,463,079 

- 129.668.071 
532.912.800 



1,937,857,854 



26,221,979,431 



740,204,053 411,023.261 



42,771,083 

287,843,304 
422,292,159 
322,661,129 
744.953.288 

15,881,389 
111,275,000 
758.880,925 



1,146.797,106 

4,386,939,047 
3,727,109,886 
1,195,679,450 
2.531.430.436 

192,362,763 
570,829,600 
765,669,353 



66,793,786 - 35,756,926 



172,207,804 

420,870,327 

42,911,274 

377.959.053 

-31,549,993 
111,005,511 
167,504,740 



167,152,010 

388,781,615 

53.428.558 

335.353.057 

-31,265,844 

10,184.544 

116,341.352 



1,961,604,989 



9,594,028,305 



730,333,329 562,008,193 



3,899,462,843 



35,816,007,736 
6,200,000,000 



- 9,870,724 
500,000,000 



973,031,454 
300,000.000 



3,899,462,843 



29,616,007,736 -509,870,724 673,031,454 



7-4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



CROWN CORPORATIONS 

Loans and advances to, and investments in, Crown corpora- 
tions represent the balance of financial claims held by the 
Government against corporations for working capital, capital 
expenditure and other purposes, investment in the capital stock 
of corporations, and loans and advances to corporations for 
re-lending. 

A Crown corporation means a parent Crown corporation or 
a wholly-owned subsidiary; a parent Crown corporation is 
wholly-owned directly by the Crown; a wholly-owned subsidi- 
ary is wholly-owned by one or more parent Crown corporations 
directly or indirectly through any number of subsidiaries each 
of which is wholly-owned directly or indirectly by one or more 
parent Crown corporations. These include the corporations 
listed in Parts I and II of Schedule C of the Financial 
Administration Act, the Bank of Canada, the Canada Council, 
the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Canadian Film 
Development Corporation, the Canadian Institute for Interna- 
tional Peace and Security, the Canadian Wheat Board, the 
International Development Research Centre, and the National 
Arts Centre Corporation. 

A Crown corporation is ultimately accountable to Parlia- 
ment, through a minister of the Crown, for the conduct of its 
affairs. Most of the Crown corporations listed in the schedules 



to the Financial Administration Act are agents of Her Majesty 
in right of Canada. This status is granted in one of the 
following ways: 
(i) designation by Parliament, through a special act of 

incorporation; 
(ii) statutory authorization; and, 
(iii) proclamation by the Government Companies Operation 

Act. 

Financial statements of parent Crown corporations can be 
found in Volume III of the Public Accounts. The financial 
statements of wholly-owned subsidiaries of Crown corpora- 
tions are also included in this volume whenever their accounts 
are not consolidated with those of the parent corporation. 
These financial statements are appended to those of the related 
parent Crown corporation. 



Lending Institutions 

Table 7.2 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the various types of loans, investments and advances 
which were made to Crown corporations providing financial 
assistance. 



TABLE 7.2 

CROWN CORPORATIONS— LENDING INSTITUTIONS 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation- 
Capital stock 

Housing 

Real estate 

Joint projects 

Urban renewal scheme 

Student housing projects 

Sewage treatment projects 

Mortgage insurance fund 

Ownership assistance 

Account without current transactions 

Export Development Corporation — 

Capital stock 

Loans 

Account without current transactions 

Farm Credit Corporation — 

Contributed capital 

Notes 

Farm syndicates loan fund 

Federal Business Development Bank — 

Paid-in capital 

Loans 

Total 





Receipts and 


Payments and 








April 1/1984 


other credits 


other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


S 






40.000,000 


40,000,000 


40,000,000 


- 140,000,000 


25,000,000 






25,000,000 






6,536,740,164 


196,836,968 


157,500,000 


6,497,403,196 


- 39,336,968 


-150,549,387 


65,153,675 


2,417,322 


1,500,000 


64,236,353 


-917,322 


-1,911,776 


1,306,815,339 


29,315,480 


117,000,000 


1,394,499,859 


87,684.520 


120,011,234 


29,150,547 


4,156,539 


500,000 


25,494,008 


- 3.656,539 


- 535,907 


381,481,641 


5,013,959 




376,467,682 


-5.013,959 


- 8.664,455 


1,112,191,832 


23,613,495 


5,500,000 


1,094,078,337 


-18,113.495 


- 20,625,975 


307,600,000 


307,600,000 






- 307.600.000 


- 6.700,000 


460,138,461 


77,615,505 




382,522,956 


-77.615,505 


-124,128,610 
-277,135 


10.224.271.659 


646.569.268 


282.000.000 


9,859,702,391 


- 364.569.268 


-193,382.011 


612,000,000 




76,000.000 


688,000,000 


76,000,000 


152,000,000 


317,125,606 


115,967,502 


553,550 


201,711,654 


-115,413,952 


-121,741,300 
- 25,000,000 


929,125,606 


115.967.502 


76.553.550 


889.711.654 


- 39.413.952 


5,258,700 


189,933,000 




28,400,000 


218,333,000 


28.400.000 


23,900,000 


4,296,486,836 


862,676,229 


665,700,000 


4,099,510,607 


-196.976.229 


356,732,724 


13,367,381 


4,348,953 


1,500,000 


10,518,428 


- 2.848.953 


- 2,398,952 


4,499.787,217 


867.025.182 


695.600,000 


4.328.362.035 


-171.425,182 


378.233,772 


294,000,000 






294,000,000 






420,000,000 


157,000,000 




263,000,000 


-157,000,000 


-172,000,000 


714,000,000 


157.000,000 




557,000,000 


- 157,000,000 


-172,000,000 


16,367,184,482 


1,786,561,952 


1,094,153.550 


15,674,776,080 


- 692,408,402 


-121,889.539 



I 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Deposit 
Insurance Corporation Act, to provide insurance, up to 
$60,000 per depositor per institution, on deposits with federal 
member institutions and approved provincial institutions. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Finance, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Section 37 of the Act provides that the Minister of Finance, 
with the approval of the Governor in Council, may advance to 
the Corporation amounts by way of loans on such terms and 
conditions as the Governor in Council may determine. The 
aggregate of such loans authorized to be outstanding at any 
time is $1,500,000,000. 

The loan made during the year bears interest at the rate of 
1 1.875% per annum, and is due March 6, 1986. 



Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Mortgage 
and Housing Corporation Act, to promote the construction of 
new houses, the repair and modernization of existing houses, 
the improvement of housing and living conditions in Canada, 
and to promote the development of communities through the 
provision of infrastructure facilities. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Labour, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $1,965.1 million from budgetary appropriations. It 
paid interest of $873.3 million and transferred $39.7 million of 
profit to the Government. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is authorized by Section 1 7 of the Canada Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation Act. 

Housing 

Advances have been made to enable the Corporation to lend 
money under the following sections of the National Housing 
Act: 

(fl) Section 14.1— for rental housing projects on the secu- 
rity of a first mortgage and to sell or purchase loans 
made on rental housing projects; 

{b) Section 1 5 — to any person to assist in 

(i) the construction, purchase or improvement of a 
low-rental housing project; 

(ii) the purchase of existing buildings and the land 
• upon which they are situated and their conversion 
into a low-rental housing project; or, 

(iii) the conversion of existing buildings into a low- 
rental housing project; 

(c) Section 27.5 — to municipalities for selected neighbour- 
hoods for the purpose of improving premises within the 
neighbourhood in respect of which the contribution is 
made; 



7'5 

(d) Section 34.1— 

(i) to the owner of a family housing unit or of housing 
accommodation of the hostel or dormitory type for 
the purpose of assisting in the repair, rehabilitation 
or improvement thereof; 

(ii) to a non profit corporation for the purpose of 
assisting in the conversion of an existing residential 
building owned by the corporation, to a building 
containing a different number of family housing 
units, housing accommodation of the hostel or 
dormitory type or a different number of hostel or 
dormitory beds; 

{e) Section 34.18 — to co-operatives for the purpose of 
assisting in the construction, acquisition or improve- 
ment of a housing project; 

(/) Section 42 — to provinces, municipalities or public hous- 
ing agencies to assist in the acquisition and the servic- 
ing of land for housing purposes; 

(g) Section 43 — to a province, municipality or public hous- 
ing agency for the construction or acquisition of a 
public housing project; 

{h) Section 58 — to a person unable to obtain a loan from 
an approved lender for construction of a house or 
housing project; and, 

(0 Section 59 — to Indians to assist in the purchase, 
improvement or construction of housing projects on 
Indian reserves. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 3.5% to 17.625% 
per annum, and are repayable over 18 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between September 30, 1997 and September 30, 
2034. 

Real estate 

Section 55 of the National Housing Act authorizes advances 
to: (fl) acquire land or housing projects by way of purchase, 
lease or otherwise; (6) install services in and effect improve- 
ments to or in respect of land acquired, and develop and lay 
out such land for housing purposes; (c) construct, convert or 
improve housing projects; and, {d) acquire building materials 
and equipment and other personal property for use in connec- 
tion with housing projects. 

During the year, additional advances were authorized by 
Public Works Vote LI 00, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85, and by Labour Vote L30b, Appropriation Act No 3, 
1984-85. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 9.525% to 16.157% 
per annum, and are repayable over 50 years, with the final 
instalment on December 31, 2033. 

Joint projects 

Section 40 of the National Housing Act authorizes advances 
to undertake projects jointly with the government of any 
province or any agency thereof, for (a) the acquisition and 
development of land for housing purposes or for any purpose 
incidental thereof; {b) the construction of housing projects or 
housing accommodation of the hostel or dormitory type for 
sale or for rent; and, (c) the acquisition, improvement and 
conversion of existing buildings for a housing accommodation 
of the hostel or dormitory type. 



7*6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



The advances bear interest at rates from 5% to 17.96% per 
annum, and are repayable over 25 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between March 3 1 , 2005 and September 30, 2034. 

Urban renewal scheme 

Advances have been made to enable the Corporation to lend 
money under Section 25 of the National Housing Act, to a 
province or municipality, to assist in the implementation of an 
urban renewal scheme. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 5.31% to 8.75% per 
annum, and are repayable over 20 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between December 31, 1985 and December 31, 
1999. 

Student housing projects 

Advances have been made to enable the Corporation to lend 
money under Section 47 of the National Housing Act, to a 
province or agency thereof, a municipality or agency thereof, a 
hospital, school board, university, college, cooperative associa- 
tion or charitable corporation, to assist in (a) the construction, 
acquisition or improvement of a student housing project; (b) 
the acquisition of existing buildings and their conversion into a 
student housing project; or, (c) the conversion of existing 
buildings into a student housing project. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 5% to 10.54% per 
annum, and are repayable over 20 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between September 30, 1993 and December 31, 
2030. 

Sewage treatment projects 

Advances have been made to enable the Corporation to lend 
money under Section 5 1 of the National Housing Act, to any 
province, municipality or municipal sewerage corporation, to 
assist in the establishment or expansion of a sewage treatment 
project, and in the construction of a trunk storm sewer system. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 5% to 10.376% per 
annum, and are repayable over 18 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between September 30, 1993 and December 31, 
2030. 

Mortgage insurance fund 

Advances were made, pursuant to Section 9(6) of the Na- 
tional Housing Act, to enable the Corporation to discharge its 
obligations under Section 8 of the Act. 

During the year. Labour Vote 26b, Appropriation Act No 3, 
1984-85, authorized the forgiveness of all advances outstand- 
ing as of June 30, 1984. 

Ownership assistance 

Advances have been made to enable the Corporation to lend 
money under Section 34.15 of the National Housing Act, to 
assist in (a) the construction of a house or a condominium unit 
by a person who owns the house or condominium unit and 
intends to occupy the house, one of the family housing units 
thereof or the condominium unit, or by a builder who intends 
to sell the house or condominium unit to a person who will own 
and occupy the house, one of the family housing units thereof, 
or the condominium unit; or, (b) the acquisition of a house or 
condominium unit by a prospective qualified owner. 



The advances bear interest at rates from 7.625% to 9.625% 
per annum, and are repayable over 20 to 50 years, with final 
instalments between December 31, 1992 and March 31, 1996. 

Export Development Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Export Develop- 
ment Act, to facilitate and develop export trade by the provi- 
sion of loans, insurance, guarantees and other financial 
facilities. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Secretary of State for External Affairs, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is authorized by Section 1 1 of the Export Development 
Act. 

During the year, the Government subscribed for 760,000 
additional shares for a total value of $76 million. 

Loans 

Loans to the Corporation are authorized by Sections 1 2 and 
1 3 of the Export Development Act. Pursuant to Section 1 2, the 
Corporation may borrow money from public and private 
sources by any means, including the issue and sale of bonds, 
debentures, notes or other evidences of indebtedness of the 
Corporation. Pursuant to Section 13, loans to the Corporation 
may be made out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund on terms 
and conditions fixed by the Minister of Finance. 

Section 14 limits the Corporation's outstanding borrowings 
under Sections 1 2 and 13 to an amount equal to ten times the 
aggregate of the paid-in capital of the Corporation from time 
to time and the retained earnings, if any, determined according 
to the most recent statements of accounts of the Corporation 
for a financial year, that have been audited by the Auditor 
General of Canada. 

For the purposes of the Export Development Act, Section 3 1 
also authorizes the making of loans by the Government of 
Canada through the Corporation. These loans are adminis- 
tered by the Corporation on behalf of the Government and are 
reported further in this section under "National governments 
including developing countries" and "Miscellaneous Loans, 
Investments and Advances". 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5.5% to 9.25% per . 
annum, and are repayable over 4 to 15 years, with final 5 
instalments between April 15, 1985 and October 15, 1988. 

During the year, receipts and other credits included loan 
repayments of $115,967,502, while payments and other 
charges included a valuation adjustment of $553,550 in respect 
of loans totalling $4,500,000 US. The Corporation paid inter- 
est of $24. 1 million to the Government. 



Farm Credit Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Farm Credit Act, to 
assist Canadian farmers to establish and develop sound farm 
enterprises through the use of long-term credit. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7*7 



The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Agriculture, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $10.3 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Contributed capital 

The Government's contribution to the capital of the Corpo- 
ration is authorized by Section 12 of the Farm Credit Act. 

The total amount authorized is not to exceed $225,000,000. 

Notes 

Promissory notes are issued to the Minister of Finance in 
respect of loans made pursuant to Section 13 of the Act, to 
provide the Corporation with funds for making loans to farm- 
ers. The total amount of such loans outstanding at any time 
may not exceed twenty-five times the capital of the 
Corporation. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(fl) repayable over 20 years, bearing interest at rates from 
9% to 12.25% per annum, with final instalments be- 
tween July 1, 1997 and July 1, 2003, $1,019,061,234; 

(6) repayable over 20 years, bearing interest at rates from 
5.375% to 8.75% per annum, with final instalments 
between December 1, 1985 and July 1, 1999, 
$1,699,079,100; 

(c) repayable over 19 years, bearing interest at rates from 
5.25% to 6% per annum, with final instalments between 
December 1, 1985 and July 1, 1986, $42,721,223; 

{d) repayable over 10 years, bearing interest at rates from 
11.25% to 12.125% per annum, with final instalments 
between July 1, 1993 and July 1, 1994, $667,597,392; 

{e) repayable over 25 years, bearing interest at rates from 
5% to 5.75% per annum, with final instalments between 
June 30, 1985 and June 30, 1986, $5,351,648; and, 

(/) repayable over 4 years, bearing interest at rates from 
11% to 12.75% per annum, with final instalments be- 
tween July 1, 1989 and July 1, 1990, $665,700,000. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $449.8 
million to the Government. 

Farm syndicates loan fund 

Advances have been made by the Minister of Finance, 
pursuant to Section 8 of the Farm Syndicates Credit Act, to 



enable the Corporation to make loans. Section 3(1) of the Act 
allows the Corporation to make loans to a farm syndicate for: 

(a) the purchase of farm machinery; 

(b) the purchase, erection or improvement of buildings; or, 

(c) the purchase or improvement of land on which build- 
ings are or are to be erected for use primarily by the 
syndicate or its members, in their farming operations. 

Section 8 of the Act limits total advances which may be 
outstanding to $25,000,000. 

The advances bear interest at rates from 9.75% to 16.5% per 
annum, and are repayable over 5 years, with final instalments 
between July 1, 1985 and July 1, 1989. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $2.1 
million to the Government. 



Federal Business Development Bank 

The Corporation was established by the Federal Business 
Development Bank Act, to promote and assist in the establish- 
ment and development of business enterprises in Canada, by 
providing financial assistance, management counselling, man- 
agement training information and advice, and such other 
services as are ancillary or incidental to any of the foregoing. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $3 1 . 1 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Paid-in capital 

The Government's contribution to the paid-in capital of the 
Corporation is authorized by Sections 28 and 52 of the Federal 
Business Development Bank Act. 

Loans 

Loans have been made to the Corporation, pursuant to 
Section 30 of the Federal Business Development Bank Act, to 
enable it to achieve its objectives. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 8.125% to 10.125% per 
annum, and are repayable over 1 to 9 years, with final 
instalments between April 1, 1985 and August 1, 1988. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $33.8 
million to the Government. 



7-8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



All Other Crown Corporations 

Table 7.3 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the various types of loans, investments and advances 
which were made to Crown corporations engaged in activities 
other than providing financial assistance. 

TABLE 7.3 

ALL OTHER CROWN CORPORATIONS 



Net increase or decrease ( — ) 



Air Canada — 

Capital stock 

Consolidated loan 

Winnipeg maintenance hangar 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited — 

Capital stock 

Contributed capital 

Housing 

Bruce heavy water plant 

Commercial products division 

Gentilly II nuclear power station 

Heavy water inventory 

Isotope production building 

Isotope production equipment 

Lepreau nuclear station 

Sheridan Park engineering design office 

Accounts without current transactions 

Canada Development Investment Corporation... 

Canadair Limited 

De Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited, 

The 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited 

Account without current transactions 

Canadian National Railways — 

Capital stock 

Consolidated loan 

Yarmouth Bar Harbour ferry services 

Canadian Government Railways — 
Working capital 

Petro-Canada — 

Capital stock — Common 

— Preferred 





Receipts and 


Payments and 








April 1/1984 


other credits 


other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


$ 


$ 


$ 


S 


S 


S 


329,009,000 






329,009,000 






232,986,900 


17,788,708 




215,198,192 


- 17,788,708 


- 16,567,068 


12,851,272 


370,200 




12,481,072 


- 370,200 


-341,796 


574,847.172 


18.158.908 




556.688.264 


- 18.158,908 


- 16,908.864 


15,000,000 






15,000.000 






149,159,473 






149,159,473 






6,055,478 


523,607 




5,531,871 


- 523,607 


- 509,204 


116,995,142 


9,804,379 




107,190,763 


- 9,804,379 


-8,733,558 


3,305,770 


455,987 




2,849,783 


-455.987 


- 425,699 


151,000,000 


1,682,200 




149,317,800 


-1,682,200 




72,500,000 


3,000,000 




69,500,000 


- 3,000,000 




11,600,000 


11,600,000 






-11,600,000 


900,000 


7,700,000 


7,700,000 






- 7,700,000 


3.900.000 


299,400,000 


3,181,477 




296.218,523 


-3,181.477 




502,794 


185,919 




316,875 


-185.919 


-175.640 
-31,900,000 


833.218.657 


38.133.569 




795.085.088 


-38,133.569 


-36.944,101 


395,658,315 






395,658,315 






14,487,081 


13,747,122 




739,959 


-13,747.122 


-147,122 


3,867,200 


3,867,200 






- 3,867.200 , 


- 5,000,000 
-500,000 


414.012.596 


17.614.322 




396.398.274 


- 17.614.322 


-5,647,122 


2,619,777,732 




6,100,000 


2,625,877,732 


6,100,000 


69,032,000 


221,530,012 


8,046,203 




213,483,809 


- 8.046,203 


- 7,385,808 


49,016 


24,508 




24,508 


- 24,508 


- 24,508 


14,099,835 


25,000 




14,074,835 


-25.000 


- 3,805 


2.855.456.595 


8.095.711 


6.100.000 


2.853.460.884 


-1.995.711 


61,617.879 


3,326,354,321 






3,326,354,321 




660.463,079 


972,771,853 






972,771,853 






4.299.126.174 






4.299.126.174 




660.463.079 


8,976,661,194 


82,002,510 


6,100,000 


8,900,758,684 


-75.902,510 


662,580,871 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
TABLE 7.3 

ALL OTHER CROWN COK?OKAT\O^S— Concluded 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



7*9 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



Other- 
Bank of Canada 5,920,000 

Canada Ports Corporation 138,467,511 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Authority 14,401,541 

152.869.052 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 3,500,000 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 33,000,000 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 10,000,000 

Canadian Dairy Commission 79,334,000 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 9,053,275 

Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships 
Ltd— 

Capital stock 976 

Advances 324,024 

325.000 

Canadian Patents and Development Limited . 296,199 

Canadian Saltfish Corporation 14,093,500 

Canadian Sports Pool Corporation 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 11,368,288 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation 10,340,248 

Halifax Port Corporation 

Loto Canada Inc 1 

Montreal Port Corporation 141,665,988 

National Capital Commission 31,103,856 

Northern Canada Power Commission — 

Loans 228,820,626 

Advances 50,000 

Working capital 7,500,000 

236.370.626 
Northern Transportation Company 

Limited — 

Capital stock 24,900,000 

Loans 30,276,778 

55.176.778 

Pecheries Canada Inc 28,491,000 

Pecheries Cartier Inc 10,000 

28.501.000 

Prince Rupert Port Corporation 

Royal Canadian Mint 14,232,375 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The 624,950,000 

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges In- 
corporated, The 59,752,867 

684.702.867 

Teleglobe Canada 5,874,592 

Uranium Canada, Limited 9 

Vancouver Port Corporation 81,310,154 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 9,300,000 

1,618,337,808 

W ToUl 10,594,999,002 



53.387,628 

94.627 

53.482.255 



510.421.374 
114.350,878 



2,131,785 

1,296,616 
149,287 



2,569,795 
2.569.795 



547,709,374 
111.611,538 



37,758,500 

20,000,000 

5,000,000 

46,330,043 


36.000,000 
20,000,000 
7,073,956 
52,000,000 
25,555,762 


300,614 
4,794,908 




10,409,997 


5.000,000 


10.409.997 


5.000.000 


3,071.188 
3.071.188 


2,998,900 




2.998.900 
27,084,979 



5,920,000 

87,649,678 

14,306,914 

101.956.592 

3,500.000 

33,000,000 

10,000,000 

116,622,000 

6,313,935 



976 

324,024 

325.000 

296,199 

12,335,000 

13,442,244 
16,010.205 
25.555.762 
1 
141.365.374 
26.308.948 

223.410.629 

50,000 

7.500,000 

230.960.629 



24,900,000 
27,205,590 
52.105.590 
31,489,900 
10,000 
31.499.900 
27,084,979 
12,100,590 
624,950,000 

59,752,867 

684.702.867 

4,577,976 

9 

81,160,867 

9,300,000 



50,817,833 -218,806,013 

- 94,627 - 88,493 

50.912.460 -218.894.506 



37,288,000 
- 2,739,340 



- 1,758,500 

2,073,956 

5.669.957 

25,555,762 

-300,614 

- 4,794.908 

- 5.409.997 



-5.409.997 



-3.071.188 

-3.071.188 

2.998.900 

2.998.900 
27.084,979 
-2,131,785 



- 1. 296.6 1 6 

- 149,287 



- 184,662.158 
- 36.365 



5.687.500 

11,368,288 
-7,701,793 



141,665,988 
- 18,522 

21.582.852 
21.582.852 



-3.157.078 
-3.157.078 

28.491.000 
10.000 

28.501.000 

- 1,971,785 



-3.341.646 

81.310.154 



809.497.445 



837.604.304 



1.646,444,667 28,106,859 -129.668,071 



891.499,955 



843,704,304 



10,547,203,351 -47,795.651 



532.912.800 



Air Canada 

The Corporation was established by the Air Canada Act, to 
provide scheduled domestic and international air services to 
North America, the British Isles, continental Europe and the 
Caribbean. 

The Corporation is not an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through. the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $17.6 
million to the Government. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 



Consolidated loan 

The loan, consolidated in 1978-79, bears interest at the rate 
of 7.243% per annum, and is repayable in semi-annual instal- 
ments over 15 years, with the final instalment on April 13, 
1993. 

Winnipeg maintenance hangar 

Loans have been made for the purpose of constructing a line 
maintenance hangar at Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

The loan, consolidated in 1 980-8 1 , bears interest at the rate 
of 8.31% per annum, and is repayable in equal annual instal- 
ments over 20 years, with the final instalment on December 
31,2001. 



7'10 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to develop the use of atomic energy for 
peaceful purposes. It also promotes, assists and performs 
research and development in support of the use of atomic 
energy that will meet near and long-term Canadian needs for 
low cost energy, and will be commercially attractive to other 
countries, and which will widen and improve the practical 
application of atomic energy in fields such as industry, agricul- 
ture and medicine. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $325.5 million from budgetary appropriations. It paid 
interest of $8 1 .6 million to the Government. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 

Contributed capital 

The Government's contribution to the capital of the Corpo- 
ration is recorded in this account. 

Housing 

Loans have been made to finance the construction of hous- 
ing near the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 3.5% to 8.5% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal monthly instalments over 
30 years, with final instalments between December 31, 1985 
and June 30, 2003. 

Bruce heavy water plant 

Loans have been made to finance the construction of the 
Bruce heavy water plant at Douglas Point, Ontario. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 6.687% to 8.5% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal monthly instalments over 
17 years, with the final instalment on December 31, 1992. 

Commercial products division 

Loans have been made to finance the construction of manu- 
facturing facilities and a laboratory at South March, Ontario. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 6.687% to 7.625% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal monthly instalments over 
20 years, with final instalments between May 31, 1988 and 
September 30, 1992. 

Gentilly II nuclear power station 

Loans have been made to finance a share in the construction 
of the CANDU-PHW 600 generating station at Gentilly, 
under an agreement with the Province of Quebec and 
Hydro-Quebec. 

The loan, consolidated in 1983-84, bears interest at the rate 
of 9.18% per annum, and is repayable in equal annual instal- 



ments over 25 years, with the final instalment on April 7, 
2008. 

Heavy water inventory 

Loans have been made to finance the production and pur- 
chase of heavy water for lease or resale to Canadian and 
foreign users. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 9.125% to 10.125% per 
annum, and are repayable at the end of 10 years, with the final 
repayment on January 1, 1988. 

Isotope production building 

Loans were made to assist in the construction of an isotope 
production building. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Isotope production equipment 

Loans were made to assist in the purchase of new 
equipment. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Lepreau nuclear station 

Loans have been made to finance a share in the construction 
of the nuclear generating station at Lepreau. 

The loan, consolidated in 1980-81, bears interest at the rate 
of 9.706% per annum, and is repayable in equal annual 
instalments over 25 years, with the final instalment on April 1 , 
2008. 

Sheridan Park engineering design office 

Loans have been made to finance the construction of office 
facilities. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5.625% to 6% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal monthly instalments over 
20 years, with the final instalment on October 31, 1986. 

Canada Development Investment Corporation 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Business Corporations Act, to: 

(fl) assist in the creation or development of businesses, 
resources, properties and industries of Canada; 

(b) expand, widen and develop opportunities for Canadians 
to participate in the economic development of Canada 
through the application of their skills and capital in any 
activities carried on by the Corporation; 

(c) invest in the shares or securities of any corporation 
owning property or carrying on business related to the 
economic interests of Canada; 

(d) invest in ventures or enterprises, including the acquisi- 
tion of property, likely to benefit Canada; and, 

(e) carry out all activities in the best interests of Canada, 
operating in a commercial manner. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion, and is 
listed in Part II of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7*1! 



During the year, Canadair Financial Corporation Inc and 
The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited respectively 
received financial assistance of $300 million and $150 million 
from budgetary appropriations. These two corporations are 
wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Canada Development Invest- 
ment Corporation. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpwra- 
tion is recorded in this account. The balance in the account 
represents the value of 1 00 common shares of the Corporation 
without nominal or par value. 

Canadair Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to manufacture and sell aircraft. The Cor- 
poration is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Canada Develop- 
ment Investment Corporation. 

Loans have been made to the Corporation for the fmancing 
of water bomber aircraft, such loans to be recovered on the 
sale of the aircraft. 

The loans are non-interest bearing and are repayable only 
when the aircraft are sold. 

The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Ontario 
Corporations Act, to manufacture and sell aircraft. The Cor- 
poration is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Canada Develop- 
ment Investment Corporation. 

Loans were made to the Corporation in respect of the costs 
of rate tooling for the DHC-7 aircraft. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to provide for the mining and refining of 
uranium, and the production of nuclear fuel in Canada. The 
Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Canada De- 
velopment Investment Corporation. 

Interest due but not received, totalling $10,093,433 as of 
March 31, 1985, was recorded in the accounts of Canada in 
previous years by being debited to a loan account and credited 
to an uncollected interest account (see Table 7.15 of this 
section). Since the Government's policy is to report revenue 
only as received, this uncollected interest was deducted from 
the loan account, to present it on a net basis. 

Canadian National Railways 

The Corporation was established by the Canadian National 
Railways Act, to provide, operate and manage a national 
system of railways. 

The Corporation is not an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $80.2 million from budgetary appropriations. 



Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 

During the year, 1 2,200 additional common shares amount- 
ing to $6,100,000 were purchased under the authority of 
Transport Vote LI 15, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85. 

During the year, the Corporation paid dividends of $42.5 
million to the Government. 

Consolidated loan 

The loan, consolidated in 1978-79, bears interest at the rate 
of 8.75% per annum, and is repayable in semi-annual instal- 
ments over 20 years, with the final instalment on June 30, 
1998. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $19.2 
million to the Government. 

Yarmouth Bar Harbour ferry services 

Recoverable advances have been made for the completion of 
the ferry terminal at Bar Harbour, Maine, USA. 

The non-interest bearing advances are repayable at $24,508 
per year over 1 1 years, with the final instalment on December 
28, 1985. 

Canadian Government Railways — Working capital 

Advances have been made for working capital purposes. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no repay- 
ment dates. 

Petro-Canada 



to: 



The Corporation was established by the Petro-Canada Act, 

(a) engage in exploration for, and development of, hydro- 
carbons and other types of fuel or energy; 

{Jb) engage in research and development projects relating to 
fuel and energy resources; 

(c) import, produce, transport, distribute, refine and 
market hydrocarbons of all descriptions; 

{d) produce, distribute, transport and market other fuels 
and energy; and, 

{e) engage or invest in ventures or enterprises related to the 
exploration, production, importation, distribution, 
refining and marketing of fuel, energy and related 
resources. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources, and is 
listed in Part II of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $60.5 million from budgetary appropriations. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is authorized by Sections 5, 22, 24.1 and 25 of the 
Petro-Canada Act. 



7-12 

Bank of Canada 

The Bank of Canada was established by the Bank of Canada 
Act, to regulate credit and currency, in the best interests of the 
economic life of the nation, to control and protect the external 
value of the national monetary unit, and to mitigate, by its 
influence, fluctuations in the general levels of production, 
trade, prices and employment so far as may be possible within 
the scope of monetary action, and generally to promote the 
economic and financial welfare of Canada. 

The Bank is not an agent of Her Majesty and reports 
through the Minister of Finance. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Bank is 
authorized by Section 17 of the Act. An amount of $5,000,000 
represents the par value of 100,000 shares, and the remaining 
balance of $920,000 represents premiums paid in respect of 
the acquisition, in 1938, of shares held by the public. 

The profits of the Bank are remitted annually to the Gov- 
ernment. In 1984-85, the profit of the Bank was $1,852.2 
million. 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

During the year, additional loans were authorized by Trans- 
port Vote L60, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) non-interest bearing, having an indefinite maturity 
date, and requiring no principal repayments, 
$55,609,434; 

(b) bearing interest at rates from 11% to 11.875% per 
annum, repayable in equal annual instalments over 10 
years, with final instalments between December 31, 
1993 and December 31, 1994, $1 1,567,827; 

(c) bearing interest at rates from 6.44% to 15.625% per 
annum, repayable in equal annual instalments over 20 
years, with final instalments between December 31, 
2000 and December 31, 2002, $17,902,623; and, 

(d) bearing interest at the rate of 11.625% per annum, 
repayable in equal instalments over 20 years, with the 
final instalment on February 28, 2005, $2,569,795. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $1.2 
million to the Government. 



Canada Ports Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Ports Cor- 
poration Act, to administer, manage and control Canadian 
harbours, and any other harbour, work or property of Canada 
transferred by the Governor in Council. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $35.2 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Under the authority of the Canada Ports Corporation Act, 
loans are made to finance capital expenditures of various 
harbours under the jurisdiction of the Canada Ports Corpora- 
tion. A summary of the balances and transactions for the loans 
made to various harbours follows: 







Receipts 


Payments 








and other 


and other 






April 1/1984 


credits 


charges March 31/1985 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


Belledune 


2,243,859 


36,591 




2,207,268 


Halifax 


.... 25,555,762 


25,555,762 






Prince Rupert 


.... 27,084,979 


27,084,979 






Sept-Iles 


2,977,437 






2,977,437 


Churchill 


.... 13,693,573 






13,693,573 


Saint John, NB 


.... 64,513,991 


646,945 


2,569,795 


66,436.841 


St John's, Nnd 


1,657,474 


43,490 




1,613,984 


Chicoutimi 


740,436 


19,861 




720,575 




138,467,511 


53,387,628 


2,569,795 


87,649,678 



Effective June 1, 1984, the ports of Halifax and Prince 
Rupert were established as local port corporations under the 
names of Halifax Port Corporation and Prince Rupert Port 
Corporation, respectively. In accordance with the Canada 
Ports Corporation Act, the assets, liabilities and equity related 
to these two ports were transferred to the new corporations. 



Saint John Harbour Bridge Authority 

Loans have been made to the Saint John Harbour Bridge 
Authority in respect of a vehicular bridge across the harbour 
of Saint John. An agreement between Canada, the Province of 
New Brunswick, the City of Saint John and the Saint John 
Harbour Bridge Authority, dated July 7, 1966, requires that 
debentures issued by the Authority and acquired by the 
Canada Ports Corporation shall be related exclusively to the 
financing of the total capital costs of the bridge (see also Table 
7.14, Miscellaneous Loans, Investments and Advances). 

The loans bear interest at rates from 6.687% to 8.5% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal semi-annual instalments 
over 50 to 51 years, with final instalments between January 1, 
2020 and January 1,2021. 

During the year, the Authority paid interest of $1 million to 
the Government. 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to maintain an efficient Canadian manufac- 
turing capability for certain military materiel for Canadian 
defence needs and related ammunition products. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Supply and Services, and is listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Advances have been made to provide working capital to the 
Corporation. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed 
repayment dates. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Broadcasting Act, 
to provide a national broadcasting service in both official 
languages, and an international broadcasting service predomi- 
nantly Canadian in content and character. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7«13 



The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty and reports 
through the Minister of Communications. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $904.9 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Advances have been made to the Corporation, for purposes 
of working capital. The total amount authorized to be out- 
standing at any time is $33,000,000. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and are repayable 
using the amounts on hand (cash and marketable securities) 
which, at any time, are in excess of what is required by the 
Corporation for working capital purposes. 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canadian Commer- 
cial Corporation Act, to assist in the development of interna- 
tional trade, assist p>ersons in obtaining goods from outside 
Canada, and dispose of goods available for export. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Secretary of State for External Affairs, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $17.6 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Section 8(1) of the Act states that advances not exceeding in 
the aggregate $10,000,000 may be made available to the 
Corporation as paid-in capital. 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

The Corporation was established by the Canadian Dairy 
Commission Act, to provide, to efficient producers of milk and 
cream, the opportunity of obtaining a fair return for their 
labour and investment, and to provide, to consumers of dairy 
products, a continuous and adequate supply of high quality 
dairy products. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Agriculture, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $332.5 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Loans have been made to the Corporation, to finance its 
dealings in dairy products. The total amount authorized to be 
outstanding at any time is $300,000,000. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 9.5% to 12.25% per 
annum, and are repayable within 1 year. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $18.1 
million to the Government. 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canadian Film 
Development Corporation Act, to foster and promote the 
development of a feature film industry in Canada. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty and reports 
through the Minister of Communications. 



During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $45.6 million from budgetary appropriations. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed 
terms of repayment. 



Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships Ltd 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to provide steamship services between 
Canada and the West Indies. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. The Corpo- 
ration was authorized to be dissolved pursuant to the Crown 
Corporations Dissolution Authorization Act, passed by the 
House of Commons on September 1 1, 1985. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 

Advances 

The advances are repayable from moneys to be received 
upon collection of the final instalment on the sale of the eight 
vessels to Cuban interests which was due to be paid August 1 9, 
1963 by an irrevocable letter of credit issued through the Bank 
of America. However, on July 3, 1963, the United States 
Cuban Assets Control Regulations became effective which 
prohibited the Bank of America from honouring payment of 
the draft. Since that time, negotiations to obtain a preferred 
status, in order to collect the receivable, have not been success- 
ful. It is the opinion of management, based on legal counsel, 
that these moneys plus applicable interest will be collected 
when the regulations are repealed. 

A waiver of the application of the statute of limitations has 
been obtained until January 1, 1989, and further extensions 
will be obtained as required. 



Canadian Patents and Development Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to make available to the public through 
licensing arrangements with industry, the industrial and intel- 
lectual property which results from publicly-funded research 
and development. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $350,000 from budgetary appropriations. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 



7-14 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Canadian Saltfish Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Saltfish Act, to 
improve the earnings of primary producers of cured cod fish. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and is listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

For the purpose of enabling the Corporation to carry on its 
operations under the Act, Section 17 provides that the Gover- 
nor in Council may authorize the Minister of Finance, on such 
terms and conditions as may be agreed, to (a) guarantee 
repayment of loans, and interest thereon, made by any bank to 
the Corporation; and, (b) make loans to the Corporation. 

The aggregate amount of loans authorized to be outstanding 
at any time, borrowed from all lenders, is $50,000,000. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) repayable within 1 year, bearing interest at rates from 
9.375% to 11.5% per annum, with final instalments 
between June 9, 1985 and October 23, 1985 
$11,500,000; and, 

(b) repayable over 10 years, bearing interest at rates from 
7.75% to 12.375% per annum, with final instalments 
between September 22, 1985 and September 30, 1990, 
$835,000. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $2.3 
million to the Government. 

Canadian Sports Pool Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Athletics Contests 
and Events Pools Act, to organize, operate and manage, alone 
or jointly with governments of any one or more provinces with 
which the Corporation has entered into an agreement or 
agreements for such purpose, pool systems in accordance with 
regulations made pursuant to Section 16 of the Act; and to 
conduct and manage, in accordance with regulations made by 
the Governor in Council, such lawful gaming activities as the 
Governor in Council directs. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of National Health and Welfare, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. The Corporation was authorized to be wound-up pursuant 
to the Sports Pool and Loto Canada Winding-Up Act, passed 
by the House of Commons on June 14, 1985, which received 
Royal Assent on June 20, 1985. The Corporation was legally 
dissolved July 10, 1985. 

During the year, loans were made to enable the Corporation 
to carry on its operations. The total amount authorized to be 
outstanding at any time was $20,000,000. These loans were 
forgiven by National Health and Welfare Vote 49b, Appro- 
priation Act No 3, 1984-85. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $36.5 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Cape Breton De- 
velopment Corporation Act, to stimulate economic adjustment 



and expansion on Cape Breton Island, while rationalizing the 
coal industry. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $107.6 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Advances have been made for the purpose of providing 
working capital for the coal division of the Corporation. The 
total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time is 
$25,000,000. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed 
repayment dates. 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Freshwater Fish 
Marketing Act, to regulate interprovincial and export trade in 
freshwater fish, and to market and trade in fish. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and is listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

For the purpose of enabling the Corporation to carry on its 
operations under the Act, Section 1 7 provides that the Gover- 
nor in Council may authorize the Minister of Finance, on such 
terms and conditions as may be agreed, to (a) guarantee 
repayment of loans, and interest thereon, made by any bank to 
the Corporation; and, (b) make loans to the Corporation. 

The aggregate amount of loans authorized to be outstanding 
at any time, borrowed from all lenders, is $30,000,000. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) repayable over 10 years, bearing interest at rates from 
8.25% to 15.625% per annum, with final instalments 
between March 30, 1988 and March 31, 1992, 
$3,510,205; and, 

(6) repayable within 1 year, bearing interest at rates from 
9.75% to 11.5% per annum, with final instalments 
between April 4, 1985 and February 22, 1986, 
$12,500,000. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $1.2 
million to the Government. 

Halifax Port Corporation 

In accordance with the Canada Ports Corporation Act, 
effective June 1 , 1 984, the Port of Halifax was established as a 
local port corporation under the name of Halifax Port Corpo- 
ration, to administer, manage and control the Port of Halifax. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Pursuant to the Canada Ports Corporation Act, the loan to 
finance capital expenditures related to the Port of Halifax was 
transferred from the Canada Ports Corporation to this 
Corporation. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

The non-interest bearing loan has an indefinite maturity 
date, and requires no principal repayment. 

Loto Canada Inc 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Business Corporations Act, to conduct and manage a national 
lottery in accordance with the National Lottery Regulations. 
The net revenues of the Corporation were paid over to the 
Receiver General for Canada, to be credited to a National 
Lottery Account, and distributed as follows: 

82.5% — to assist in the financing of the deficit of the 1976 
Olympic Games and to assist in the financing of the 
1978 Commonwealth Games; 

12.5% — to the provinces, in proportion to the number of 
lottery tickets sold in each province; and, 

5% — for the purpose of physical fitness, amateur sport 
and recreation programs. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of National Health and Welfare, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. The Corporation was authorized to be wound-up pursuant 
to the Sports Pool and Loto Canada Winding-Up Act, passed 
by the House of Commons on June 14, 1985, which received 
Royal Assent on June 20, 1985. The Corporation was legally 
dissolved July 10, 1985. 

The balance in the account represents the purchase, for $1, 
of the common shares of Loto Canada Inc. 

Montreal Port Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Ports Cor- 
poration Act, to administer, manage and control the Port of 
Montreal. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Loans have been made to finance capital expenditures relat- 
ed to the Port of Montreal. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) non-interest bearing, having an indefinite maturity 
date, and requiring no principal repayments, 
$132,994,837; and, 

{b) bearing interest at the rate of 6.25% per annum, repay- 
able in equal annual instalments over 20 years, with the 
final instalment on December 31, 2000, $8,370,537. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $0.5 
million to the Government. 

National Capital Commission 

The Corporation was established by the National Capital 
Act, to prepare plans for, and assist in, the development, 
conservation and improvement of the National Capital Region, 
in order that the nature and character of the seat of the 
Government of Canada may be in accordance with its national 
Significance. 



7«I5 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Public Works, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $97.1 million from budgetary appropriations. 

Loans have been made for the purpose of acquiring property 
in the National Capital Region. During the year, additional 
loans were authorized by Public Works Vote LI 20, Appropria- 
tion Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5% to 9% per annum. 
No dates for repayment of principal are specified except that 
loans and interest are required to be repaid by the full 
proceeds of property sales. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $2.1 
million to the Government. 



Northern Canada Power Commission 

The Corporation was established by the Northern Canada 
Power Commission Act, to construct, purchase, rent or other- 
wise acquire, operate and maintain electrical power plants 
within the Northwest Territories and the Yukon Territory and, 
with the approval of the Governor in Council, but subject to 
the laws of the provinces, elsewhere in Canada. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment, and is listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial 
Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $18.7 
million to the Government. 

Loans 

Loans have been made to the Corporation for capital expen- 
ditures. During the year, additional loans were made under 
authority of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Vote 
L60, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 4% to 15.625% per 
annum, and are repayable annually up to March 31, 2024. 

On March 28, 1985, PC 1985-6/1041 amended the terms 
and conditions of certain loans made to the Corporation, by 
setting the rate of interest to zero percent for 1984-85. The 
total amount of interest forgiven in 1984-85 is $9.3 million. 
This forgiveness of interest was necessary to prevent the 
Corporation from suffering an operating loss on rate zone 
basis. An operating loss would have resulted since the Govern- 
ment directed the Corporation to restrict the increase in 
electrical prices for public utilities supplied in each rate zone 
to 6% and 5% during 1983-84 and 1984-85, respectively. 

Advances 

Section 14 of the Northern Canada Power Commission Act 
authorized the payment to the Commission of $50,000 for the 
purpose of meeting expenditures incurred in carrying out 
investigations in accordance with Section 1 3 of the Act. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed 
repayment dates. 



7-16 

Working capital 

Loans have been made to the Corporation, for the purpose 
of maintaining inventories and meeting current liabilities. 

The loans are non-interest bearing, and are repayable in 10 
equal annual instalments of $750,000, commencing March 31, 
1990. Should any instalment become in arrears, interest at the 
then current rate is applicable until payment of such 
instalment. 

Northern Transportation Company Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to provide a general transportation service 
throughout Northern Canada and the Arctic, together with 
related intermodal services. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. The Corpo- 
ration was authorized to be disposed of pursuant to the 
Northern Transportation Company Limited Disposal Authori- 
zation Act, passed by the House of Commons on June 27, 
1985, which received Royal Assent on June 28, 1985. 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. In addition, 1,520 no par value 
shares of the Corporation, having a total value of $152,000, 
were transferred, at no cost, to the Minister of Transport, 
under the authority of PC 1975-2055 dated September 11, 
1975. 

Loans 

Loans have been made to the Corporation, to finance the 
acquisition of transportation facilities for the movement of 
goods to the Canadian North. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) bearing interest at rates from 8.375% to 8.5% per 
annum, repayable over 1 5 years, with final instalments 
between October 15, 1989 and October 15, 1990, 
$3,159,246; and, 

{b) bearing interest at the rate of 7.45% per annum, repay- 
able over 1 5 years, with the final instalment on Decem- 
ber 31, 1991, $24,046,344. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $2.3 
million to the Government. 

Pecheries Canada Inc 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Business Corporations Act. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and is listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. This investment, authorized by 
the Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act, was made for the 
restructure of the Pecheries Unies in the Province of Quebec, 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

to help them become more viable, competitive and privately- 
owned. 

Pecheries Cartier Inc 

In 1983-84, the Government purchased, pursuant to the 
Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act, 10 class A voting shares 
of Pecheries Cartier Inc for the restructure of the Pecheries 
Unies in the Province of Quebec, to help them become more 
viable, competitive and privately-owned. 

The Government of Canada owns 0.04% of the issued voting 
shares of Pecheries Cartier Inc. The balance of the issued 
voting shares of Pecheries Cartier Inc is owned by Pecheries 
Canada Inc. 



Prince Rupert Port Corporation 

In accordance with the Canada Ports Corporation Act, 
effective June 1, 1984, the Port of Prince Rupert was estab- 
lished as a local port corporation under the name of Prince 
Rupert Port Corporation, to administer, manage and control 
the Port of Prince Rupert. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Pursuant to the Canada Ports Corporation Act, the loan to 
finance capital expenditures related to the Port of Prince 
Rupert was transferred from the Canada Ports Corporation to 
this Corporation. 

The non-interest bearing loan has an indefinite maturity 
date, and requires no principal repayment. 

Royal Canadian Mint 

The Corporation was established by the Royal Canadian 
Mint Act, to: 

(a) produce and arrange for the production and supply of 

coins of the currency of Canada; 
{b) produce coins of the currency of other countries; 

(c) melt, assay, refine, buy and sell gold, silver and other 
metals for the account of Canada; and, 

{d) make medals, plaques and other things as are incidental 
to the powers of the Mint. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Supply and Services, and is listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Section 18(l)(a) of the Act states that loans not exceeding 
in the aggregate $5,000,000 may be made to the Mint, to meet 
establishment and operating expenses. 

Section 18(l)(b) of the Act states that loans may be made 
to the Mint, to finance the costs of capital projects approved 
by the Governor in Council. 

Section 18(2) of the Act states that the total amount 
outstanding at any time, of loans made under Section 18(1), 
shall not exceed $35,000,000. 

Section 19(2) of the Act states that the aggregate of all 
amounts loaned to the Mint for temporary purposes and 
outstanding at any time, shall not exceed $1,000,000. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7-17 



The loans bear interest at rates from 7.625% to 1 1 .625% per 
annum, and are repayable over 1 to 14 years, with final 
instalments between April 1, 1985 and April 1, 1998. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $1.4 
million and transferred $3.3 million of profit to the 
Government. 

The St Lawrence Seaway Authority 

The Corporation was established by The St Lawrence 
Seaway Authority Act, to construct, operate and maintain, 
either wholly in Canada or in conjunction with works under- 
taken by an appropriate authority in the United States, a deep 
waterway between the Port of Montreal and Lake Erie. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $3 million from budgetary appropriations. 

The Government's contribution to the capital of the Corpo- 
ration is recorded in this account. 

The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Business Corporations Act, to operate and maintain the 
Jacques Cartier Bridge and the Champlain Bridge, and a 
portion of the Bonaventure Autoroute, in Montreal (Quebec). 
The Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of The St 
Lawrence Seaway Authority. 

This account records loans which were transferred from the 
Canada Ports Corporation. 

On December 17, 1981, as per PC 1981-3635, the certifi- 
cates of indebtedness were cancelled and replaced by a certifi- 
cate bearing an issue date of April 1, 1981, an indefinite due 
date, with no repayment of principal, and an interest rate 
equal to zero percent per annum. Furthermore, accrued and 
unpaid interest amounting to $44,513,580 as of March 31, 
1981, on the original certificates, are to be treated as not due 
and payable as of April 1 , 1981. 

A non-interest bearing advance of $6,489,605 is reported by 
the Corporation as being due to the Government. Although 
this amount has been deleted in the past, from the accounts of 
Canada, by a direct charge to the accumulated deficit account, 
it has not been forgiven. 

Teleglobe Canada 

The Corporation was established by the Teleglobe Canada 
Act, to establish, maintain and operate, in Canada and else- 
where, external telecommunication services by cable, 
radiotelegraph, radio-telephone and any other means of tele- 
communication for the conduct of public communications, and 
to coordinate Canada's external telecommunication services 
with those of other parts of the British Commonwealth of 
Nations. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion and is 
listed in Part II of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. 

Section 1 2 of the Act provides that the Minister of Finance, 
with the approval of the Governor in Council, may pay to the 



Corporation, for capital purposes, amounts not exceeding 
$4,500,000 and, in addition, any other moneys appropriated by 
Parliament. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 3.5% to 5.75% per 
annum, and are repayable in semi-annual instalments over 15 
to 40 years, with final instalments between March 30, 1986 
and September 30, 1998. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $251,327 
to the Government. 

Uranium Canada, Limited 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Corporations Act, and continued under the Canada Business 
Corporations Act, to provide for the acquisition and sale of 
uranium concentrates. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources, and is 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act. The Corporation was authorized to be dissolved pursuant 
to the Crown Corporations Dissolution Authorization Act, 
passed by the House of Commons on September 11, 1985. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 

Vancouver Port Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Ports Cor- 
poration Act, to administer, manage and control the Port of 
Vancouver. 

The Corporation is an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part II of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

Loans have been made to finance capital expenditures relat- 
ed to the Port of Vancouver. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) non-interest bearing, having an indefinite maturity 
date, and requiring no principal repayments, 
$76,494,444; and, 

{b) bearing interest at the rate of 7.5% per annum, repay- 
able in equal annual instalments over 20 years, with the 
final instalment on December 31, 2000, $4,666,423. 

During the year, the Corporation paid interest of $361,178 
to the Government. 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 

The Corporation was incorporated pursuant to the Canada 
Business Corporations Act, to revitalize passenger rail services 
in Canada, and to manage and market them on an efficient 
commercial basis, reducing the financial burden on the 
Government. 

The Corporation is not an agent of Her Majesty, reports 
through the Minister of Transport, and is listed in Part I of 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act. 

During the year, the Corporation received financial assist- 
ance of $537.5 million from budgetary appropriations. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion is recorded in this account. 



7«li 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Government of Canada Financial Interest in 
Crown Corporations 

Table 7.4 summarizes the Government's financial interest in 
its Crown corporations as at March 31, 1985. 

In accordance with the accounting policies of the Govern- 
ment, the accounts of Crown corporations are not consolidated 
with those of the Government and only the financial transac- 
tions between the Government and Crown corporations are 
recorded in the accounts of Canada. Crown corporations are 
categorized as being either agents or non-agents of the Crown. 
Agency status is normally expressly stated in the articles of 
incorporation. Crown corporations are defmed to include 
either parent Crown corporations or wholly-owned subsidiar- 
ies. A wholly-owned subsidiary is wholly-owned by one or 
more parent Crown corporations. This table includes con- 
solidated financial information on parent Crown corporations. 
Financial information on unconsolidated wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary corporations is presented separately. This table summa- 
rizes financial information regarding agent and non-agent 
Crown corporations as at March 31, 1985. This financial 
information is based on financial statements prepared accord- 
ing to generally accepted private sector accounting principles. 
For Crown corporations with financial year ends other than 
March 31, unaudited financial information is included in the 
table. The table displays "Assets" less "Borrowings and other 
liabilities", to arrive at "Net assets". "Assets" are further 
analysed in Table 7.5 "Details of Government of Canada 
Financial Interest in Crown Corporations" which follows. 

In accordance with Section 45 of the Financial Administra- 
tion Act, the payment of all money borrowed by agent Crown 
corporations, and interest thereon, is a charge on and payable 
out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Such borrowings 
therefore constitute unconditional obligations of the Govern- 
ment and are recorded as such in the accounts of Canada net 
of borrowings expected to be repaid directly by these corpora- 
tions. Such borrowings are included in the column "Borrow- 
ings from other than Government". The amounts which are 
expected to be repaid by the Government are deducted from 
this column and are described as the "Allowance for borrow- 
ings of agent Crown corporations expected to be repaid by the 
Government". 

Borrowings of non-agent Crown corporations are not obliga- 
tions of the Government. However, when the Government 
expressly guarantees such borrowings, they become potential 
obligations of the Government. 

Balances which represent transactions with the Government, 
and which are recorded in the accounts of Canada include: 



long-term obligations to the Government, share capital and 
contributed surplus as well as claims against the Government. 
Such balances are described in this table as "Recorded finan- 
cial interest" of the Government. 

"Unrecorded financial interest" represents retained earnings 
of agent and non-agent Crown corporations adjusted for items 
which had previously been included in their asset and liability 
accounts. These adjustments arise from timing differences in 
the recording of transactions between the Crown corporations 
and the Government. Crown corporations record amounts 
payable to or receivable from Government on an accrual basis 
for such items as income taxes. The accounts of Canada do not 
include such amounts until payment is either received or made. 
Such amounts which represent transactions with the Govern- 
ment and which are not recorded in the accounts of Canada 
are adjusted and reported under "Unrecorded financial inter- 
est". They include: grants receivable, current or deferred 
income taxes receivable or payable, capitalized or accrued 
interest payable, sundry accounts payable, long-term capital- 
ized leases payable and prepaid expenses related to Canada. 
"Unrecorded financial interest" adjustments represent funds 
which will be eventually received or disbursed by Canada. Also 
added to "Unrecorded financial interest" is the "Allowance for 
borrowings of agent Crown corporations expected to be repaid 
by the Government" as previously described. Total financial 
interest represents recorded and unrecorded financial interest. 
The minus sign indicates a negative financial interest. 

Other information presented in this table includes "Change 
in financial interest from previous year" which identifies the 
net increase or decrease since April 1, 1984. The major 
changes in financial interest, including gross transactions with 
outside parties, are presented in Table 7.5 "Details of Govern- 
ment of Canada Financial Interest in Crown Corporations". 
Also included in this table is the "Financial assistance under 
budgetary appropriations" which summarizes the assistance 
received by these entities during 1984-85. Details are given in 
Table 7.7 "Financial Assistance under Budgetary Appropria- 
tions to Crown Corporations". 

Also, Section 40 of the Financial Administration Act states 
that "an annual statement of all borrowing transactions on 
behalf of Her Majesty shall be included in the Public 
Accounts". A statement of all borrowing transactions on 
behalf of Her Majesty is included in Section 1 3 of this volume. 
Transactions and balances related to Crown corporations are 
presented in Note 3 to this table. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
TABLE 7.4 



7'I9 



GOVERNMENT OF CANADA FINANCIAL INTEREST IN CROWN CORPORATIONS 
AS AT MARCH 31, 1985 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Borrowings and 
other liabilities 



Financial interest 



Crown corporationsO^^^ 



Assets 



Borrowings 

from other 

than 

Govern- 

nient<'> 



All other 
liabilities 



Net 
assets 



Agent Crown corporations 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 1,223,898 36,263 273,508 914.127 
Canada Deposit Insurance 

Corporation**' 1,380.668 979,963 1,250,138 -849,433 
Canada Development Investment 

Corporation*') 1,926,000 1,735,158 542,842 -352,000 
Canada Harbour Place Corporation 69,061 11,751 57,310 
'Canada Lands Company (Mira- 
bel) Limited 2,314 316 1,998 
'Canada Lands Company (Le 

Vieux-Port de Montreal) Limited 3,920 5,710 -1,790 
'Canada Lands Company (Vieux- 
Port de Quebec) Inc 3.537 3.061 476 

Canada Mortgage and Housing 

Corporation^ 10,422,060 1,072,808 9,349,252 

Canada Museums Construction 

Corporation Inc 50,024 5,237 44,787 

Canada Ports Corporation 159,831 19,696 10,088 130,047 

Canada Post Corporation 2,032,465 722,744 1,309,721 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 103,139 34,569 68,570 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 651,124 244,912 406.212 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 371.340 341.678 29.662 

Canadian Dairy Commission 108.307 84.028 24.279 

Canadian Film Development Corpo- 
ration 5.855 3,974 1,881 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board 830 2,252 -1,422 

Canadian National (West Indies) 

Steamships Ltd<') 879 14 865 

Canadian Patents and Development 

Limited 1.042 560 482 

Canadian Saltfish Corporation 14.512 5.158 9,354 

Canadian Sports Pool Corporation .. 1.206 3.519 -2.313 

Canadian Wheat Board. The 5.049.339 3.968.141 1.079.118 2,080 

Canagrex 2,282 436 1,846 

Cape Breton Development Corpora- 
tion 395,745 39,126 356,619 

Defence Construction (1951) Lim- 
ited 655 4,193 -3,538 

Export Development Corporation 6,689,074 5,290,584 303,911 1,094,579 

Farm Credit Corporation 4,940,221 570,476 22,500 4,347,245 

Federal Business Development Bank 1,479.541 1.022.597 70,101 386,843 
Freshwater Fish Marketing Corpo- 
ration 27,245 12,471 14.774 

Halifax Port Corporation 48.879 4.156 44,723 

Loto Canada Inc 

Montreal Port Corporation 124,544 16,680 107,864 

National Capital Commission 427,777 23,473 404,304 

Northern Canada Power Commis- 
sion 255,002 10,702 244.300 

Northern Transportation Company 

Limited 73.001 4,108 68,893 

Pecheries Canada I nc<*) 20,921 2,681 18,240 

Petro-Canada 8,863,721 317,740 2,613,540 5,932,441 

•Canertech IncW 19,246 6,421 12,825 

Port of Quebec Corporation 42,025 2,380 39,645 

Prince Rupert Port Corporation 73,780 1,944 71,836 

Royal Canadian Mint 55,631 9,239 46,392 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, 

The 615,159 25,589 589,570 

•Seaway International Bridge Cor- 
poration, Ltd, The 352 8 298 46 

Teleglobe Canada 581,148 69,680 86,083 425,385 

Uranium Canada, Limited ('*) ('*) 

Vancouver Port Corporation 183,799 13,090 170,709 
48.501.099 14.010.306 8.971.107 25.519.686 
Allowance for borrowings of agent 
Crown corporations expected to 

be repaid by the Government -1.200.000 1.200.000 
48.501.099 12.810.306 8.971.107 26.719.686 

Non-agent Crown corporations 

Air Canada 2,451,716 1,10 

Atlantic Pilotage Authority 1,271 

Bank of Canada*"" 4,355,501 

Canada Council 77,383 

Canadian Institute for International 

Peace and Security 284 96 188 

Canadian National Railway 

SystemC) 7,260,261 2,643,785 1,266,477 3,349,999 

CN Marine Inc 322,329 40,525 281.804 



535.226 809.189 

902 369 

20.905.529 - 16,550,028 

23,227 52,677 



Recorded by the Government 



Share capital Claims 
Obligations and against 

to the contributed the 

Government surplus Government 



Unrecorded Total 
financial nnancial 
interest interest 



Change in 
financial 
Interest 

from 
previous 

year 



630,926 164,159 
40,000 

740 395.658 



9,834.702 

101.957 

3.500 
33,000 

116,622 

6,314 

324 

12,335 

13,442 



201,712 688,000 

4,110,029 218,333 

263,000 294,000 



16.010 
25.556 



141.365 
26.309 



27,206 



27,085 
12,101 



4,578 



81,161 
15.960.935 



25,000 



10,000 



I 
296 



(14) 



24.900 

31,500 

4,299,126 



(M) 
6.775.923 



1,808 
18,791 



8,000 
19,200 



2.487 
1.571 



83,312 
310,033 
20,720 
40.473 
8.000 
71.809 

6,329 
2.116 

95 

250 

7,000 
498 



1,331 



1,389 
5,047 



84,789 



9.008 



109.024 
908 



12.458 



130.341 

17.040 

40.095 

6.493 

24.090 

53.627 



40.561 
1. 148.481 



120.850 



- 740.398 
76.510 

1,998 

697 

2,047 

-510.450 

44.787 

111,402 

1,619,754 

85,790 

413,685 

27,662 

-20.534 

1,896 
694 

635 



436 

-2,981 
4,687 
2,578 
1.846 

344.508 

-2.149 

209.914 

18,883 

-85,368 

-1.236 
28.175 

75.523 
378.903 

25,797 

16,787 
-13.260 
1,763.656 
29,865 
79,740 
51,244 
58,381 

18,247 

46 
430.595 

130.109 
3.931.309 



914.127 

- 849.433 

- 352.000 

57,310 

1.998 

-1.790 

476 

9,349.252 

44,787 
130,047 
1,309,721 
68,570 
406,212 
29,662 
24,279 

1,881 
-1,422 

865 

482 

9,354 

-2,313 

2,080 

1,846 

356,619 

-3,538 
1.094.579 
4.347.245 

386.843 

14.774 

44.723 

(14) 

107.864 
404.304 

244.300 

68.893 
18.240 
5.932.441 
12.825 
39.645 
71.836 
46.392 

589.570 

46 

425.385 

(14) 

170.709 

25.519.686 



1.200,000 1.200.000 
15.960.935 6.775.923 1. 148.481 5.131.309 26.719.686 



329.009 7.371 

29 

5,920 17,045,710 

19,909 



259,872 809.189 

398 369 

489,762 -16,550,028 

72.586 52.677 



227.583 2.625.878 



1.048 



71.138 
7,745 



1.236 



567,676 
289,549 



188 



3,349,999 
281,804 



-47,930 



165,000 
28,955 



-649 



-1,881 



- 502.687 

31.618 

-153,832 

-335.771 

18.002 

5.015 

3.764 

-17.684 

-1.867 
-287 

86 

-300 

-4.558 

-4.053 

6.073 

1.661 

40.800 

-955 

- 36.472 

- 202,380 

- 149.919 

2.986 

44.723 

-15.383 

8.312 

27.146 

954 

118 

- 10.261 
414.084 
-13.259 

39,645 
71,836 
10.628 

-9.070 

-37 
112.896 

18,480 
-828.093 



50,000 
- 778.093 



- 35,829 

-185 

- 24,949 

3,536 

188 

-114,933 
281,804 



Financial 
auistancc 

under 
budgetary 
appropria- 
tions 



325,536 



450,000 
48,100 

8.100 

31,609 

26,987 

1,965.063 

31.495 

35.167 

515.831 

904.927 

17.617 

332.489 

45,571 
18.658 



350 

36.500 

130.812 

5.400 

107.573 

14.488 

10,283 
31.108 



97,055 



60,500 
17.040 



5.271.259 
5.271.259 

91 

72.614 

1,500 

80.231 
164,707 



7-20 

TABLE 7.4 

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA FINANCIAL INTEREST IN CROWN CORPORATIONS 
AS AT MARCH 31, \9%5— Concluded 
(in thousands of dollars) 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Crown corporations^)*^* 





Borrowings and 
other liabilities 


Net 
assets 




Financial interest 










Borrowings 
from other 
than 
Govern- 
ment*') 


All other 
liabilities 


Recorded by the Government 


Unrecorded 
Hnancial 
interest 


Total 
Hnancial 
interest 


Change in 
financial 
interest 

from 

previous 

year 




Assets 


Share capital 
Obligations and 

to the contributed 
Government surplus 


Claims 

against 

the 

Government 


Financial 
assistance 

under 
budgetary 
appropria- 
tions 


1,362 
7,883 




3.994 
4,452 


-2,632 
3.431 




10.355 


-2,632 
13,786 


-2,632 
3,431 


-612 
3,431 


263 
20,912 

800 


5,526 




11.921 


-6.395 






-6,395 


- 6,395 


2,066 


81,000 


27,330 
4,454 




2,184 
4.038 


25.146 
416 


59.752 


330 


- 34,276 
416 


25,146 
416 


-641 
-121 


4,387 
1,476 


5,485 
4,908 

1,557 


945 


3.835 
2.015 
1,444 


705 

2.893 

113 






705 

2,893 

113 


705 

2,893 

113 


-7,041 
133 
37 


14,932 


1,150 
5,179 




865 


I.ISO 

4.314 






1,150 
4,314 


1,150 
4,314 


957 


6,612 


647,605 
15.181.184 


3.753.510 


110.234 
22.916.964 - 


537.371 
-11.489.290 


9.300 
515.014 2.970.107 


110.372 
17.274.007 


638,443 
2.299.596 - 


537,371 
11.489.290 


-9,089 
98.752 


537,516 
987.041 


63,682,283 


16,563,816 


31,888,071 


15,230,396 


16,475,949 9,746,030 


18,422,488 


7,430,905 


1 5,230,396 


-679,341 


6,258,300 



Great Lakes Pilotage Authority, 

Ltd 

Harbourfront Corporation 

International Centre for Ocean 

Development*'^' 

International Development 

Research Centre 

•Jacques Cartier and Champlain 

Bridges Incorporated, The 

Laurentian Pilotage Authority 

Mingan Associates, Ltd*'-" 

National Arts Centre Corporation.... 

Pacific Pilotage Authority 

St Anthony Fisheries Limited 

Societa a responsibilita limitata 

Immobiliare San Sebastiano 

Standards Council of Canada 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 



*" All Crown corporations listed in this table are parent Crown corporations unless indicated by an asterisk(*). 

*^' As a result of an amendment to the Financial Administration Act (FA Act), the following Crown corporations were added to this table: Pecheries Canada Inc, 
Canada Council, Harbourfront Corporation, Mingan Associates, Ltd, National Arts Centre Corporation, St Anthony Fisheries Limited, Societa a responsibilita 
limitata Immobiliare San Sebastiano and Standards Council of Canada. Subsequently, the following corporations were also added to the FA Act and this table: 
Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, International Centre for Ocean Development, International Development Research Centre, Prince Rupert 
Port Corporation and Halifax Port Corporation. The following unconsolidated subsidiaries are reported separately: Canada Lands Company (Mirabel) Limited, 
Canada Lands Company (Le Vieux Port de Montreal) Limited, Canada Lands Company (Vieux Port de Quebec) Inc, Canertech Inc, CN Marine Inc, The Jacques 
Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated and The Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd. 

Subsequent to the year end. Parliament approved legislation to procure the dissolution of Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships Ltd, St Anthony Fisheries 
Limited, Societa a responsibilita limitata Immobiliare San Sebastiano, Uranium Canada, Limited, and has sold the Northern Transportation Company Limited to 
the Inuvialuit Development Corporation and Nunasi Corporation. 

This amendment to the FA Act also re-classified the National BattleHelds Commission and Crown Assets Disposal Corporation as departmental corporations which 
are part of the Government as an accounting entity. 

*'' The borrowing transactions shown below are borrowings by agent Crown corporations which are reported as such on the Government's Statement of Assets and 
Liabilities, except where the Government is the lender. Borrowings by non-agent Crown corporations are not included because such borrowings are not on behalf of 
Her Majesty. 



Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Development Investment Corporation*'' 

Canada Ports Corporation 

Canadian Wheat Board, The 

Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Federal Business Development Bank 

Petro-Canada 

Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd, The 

Teleglobe Canada 

Total 

Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corporations expected to be 
repaid by the Government*'' 

Borrowings expected to be repaid by agent Crown corporations 

Interest and exchange adjustments included in the above allowance and 
recorded in the accounts of Canada 

Gross borrowings by agent Crown corporations reported on the Statement 
of Assets and Liabilities 



April 1, 1984 


Borrowings 
and other 
charges 


Retirements 

and other 

credits 


March 31, 1985 


$ 

43,804 

868,787 

1,713,247 

20,106 

2,821,876 

4,838,692 

305,600 

920,894 

227,809 

8 

64,435 


S 

181,059 
824,770 

4,216,752 
28,131,666 

264,876 
2,191,812 

583,141 


$ 

7,541 

69,883 

802,859 

410 

3,070,487 

27,679,774 

2,090,109 
493,210 


S 

36,263 

979,963 

1,735,158 

19,696 

3,968,141 

5,290,584 

570,476 

1,022,597 

317,740 

8 

69,680 


7,623 


2,378 


11,825,258 


36,401,699 


34,216,651 


14,010.306 


1,150,000 




50,000 


1,200,000 


10,675,258 


36,401,699 


34,266,651 


12,810,306 


87,926 




34,099 


53,827 


10,763,184 


36,401,699 


34,300,750 


12,864,133 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 7*21 

(^> Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation — Unrecorded financial interest consists of premiunu credited to the Deposit Insurance Fund plus adjusted accumulated net 
earnings. The deposits with member institutions insured by the Corporation totalled $172.6 billion as at April 30, 1985. 

(') Canada Development Investment Corporation: On March 30, 1984, Canadair Limited changed its name to Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. The loans and 
other general obligations of Canadair Limited have been assumed by Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. The financial statements of Canadair Financial 
Corporation Inc are consolidated with those of the Canada Development Investment Corporation and the outstanding loans amounting to $1,146,173 (including 
$29,197 of accrued interest and exchange adjustments) are included under the Canada Development Investment Corporation. This amount is reported in this table 
and the principal portion is included in the Government's Statement of Assets and Liabilities as "Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid by 
the Government" while the interest portion is included under "Interest and matured debt" which is part of "Other liabilities". Also included under the Canada 
Development Investment Corporation are the borrowings of its subsidiaries The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited, and Canadair Limited amounting to 
$21,148. In addition, the borrowings of Eldorado Nuclear Limited, another subsidiary of the Canada Development Investment Corporation, amounting to $567,837 
are also included. During the current fiscal year, Canadair Financial Corporation Inc and The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited received respectively an 
amount of $300,000,000 and $150,000,000 under budgetary appropriations. The separate financial statements of Canadair Limited, The de Havilland Aircraft of 
Canada, Limited and Eldorado Nuclear Limited, are included in Volume III of the Public Accounts as appendices to the Canada Development Investment 
Corporation. In June 1985, the Government passed legislation authorizing the Minister of Finance to make arrangements to assume direct responsibility for the 
repayment of outstanding loan obligations of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc amounting to approximately $1.2 billion. Subsequently, by the end of August 
1985, the Government had repaid approximately $763,625,000 of this amount leaving $280 million US and $50 million Cdn outstanding. 

'^* Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation — Unrecorded financial interest includes a net deficit of $777,317,000 in insurance and guarantee funds. The estimated 
amount of insurance in force as at March 31, 1985 was $39.5 billion. 

(^) Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships Ltd — The assets of the Corporation include blocked funds amounting to $878,582 of which $470,400 has been due 
since 1963 from Cuban interests, and, $408,1 82 represents interest due from the Bank of America. 

<" Pecheries Canada Inc — Financial information used is as of December 31, 1984. 

*') Canertech Inc is an unconsolidated subsidiary of Petro-Canada and financial information used is as of December 31, 1984. 

('°' Bank of Canada— Recorded share capital includes $920,000 representing a premium paid in respect of the acquisition in 1938 of shares held by the public. 
Consequently, unrecorded financial interest has been reduced by $920,000. "All other liabilities" include an amount of $1 10,022,384 representing deposits of the 
Government of Canada on hand in the Bank of Canada. Income and expense figures are as of December 31,1 984. 
'"* Canadian National Railway System — Recorded share capital includes a premium of $19,452,732 representing the excess of previous years' depreciation not charged 
to Canadian National Railway's retained earnings over the Government's investments in Canadian Government Railways and Canadian National Railways 
Company. These investments were charged to budgetary expenditure by the Government of Canada and were credited to shareholder's equity by Canadian National 
Railways. Consequently, after the capital revision of Canadian National Railways, the recorded capital stock of the Corporation is $19,452,732 less than the 
recorded investment of the Government. Accordingly, unrecorded financial interest is being reduced by this deficiency. "Borrowings from other than Government" 
include $97,347,(X)0 which is guaranteed by the Government. 
(<2> In accordance with the International Centre for Ocean Development Act, financial information will not be available until December 31, I98S. 
<''> Mingan Associates, Ltd — No financial information available. 
<'") Less than $500. 



7*22 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Details of Government of Canada Financial 
Interest in Crown Corporations 

Table 7.5 presents balances which appear in Table 7.4 
"Government of Canada Financial Interest in Crown Corpora- 
tions". "Assets" are segregated between "Financial assets" 
and "Non-financial assets". "Financial assets" comprise cash, 
short-term investments and accounts receivable; "Non-finan- 
cial assets" include inventories, prepaid expenses, deferred 
charges, intangible assets, and fixed assets net of accumulated 
depreciation. 

This table also presents changes in the unrecorded financial 
interest for the year ended March 31, 1985, by displaying the 
opening balance, income and expenses and resulting net 
income (loss), other adjustments and the closing balance for 
each Crown corporation. 



Income and expenses of Crown corporations are shown net 
of transactions with the Government and other Crown corpo- 
rations and are those of the previous twelve months. This 
results in the amount of net income (loss) received from 
outside sources. 

Other adjustments include the net effect, from year to year, 
of the timing differences which make up the balance of 
unrecorded financial interest. These items relate to asset and 
liability accounts recorded by the corporations but not record- 
ed in the accounts of Canada. 

The revenues and expenses of Crown corporations which 
relate to the Government and other Crown corporations com- 
plete the other adjustments category. 



TABLE 7.5 

DETAILS OF GOVERNMENT OF CANADA FINANCIAL INTEREST IN CROWN CORPORATIONS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Unrecorded financial interest 



Agent Crown corporations 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Canada Development Investment Corporation 

Canada Harbour Place Corporation 

•Canada Lands Company (Mirabel) Limited 

•Canada Lands Company (Le Vieux-Port de Montreal) 

Limited 

•Canada Lands Company (Vieux-Port de Quebec) Inc 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Canada Museums Construction Corporation Inc 

Canada Ports Corporation 

Canada Post Corporation 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board 

Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships Ltd 

Canadian Patents and Development Limited 

Canadian Saltfish Corporation 

Canadian Sports Pool Corporation 

Canadian Wheat Board, The 

Canagrex 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Federal Business Development Bank 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation 

Halifax Port Corporation 

Loto Canada Inc 

Montreal Port Corporation 

National Capital Commission 

Northern Canada Power Commission 

Northern Transportation Company Limited 

Pficheries Canada Inc 

Petro-Canada 

•Canertech Inc 

Port of Quebec Corporation 

Prince Rupert Port Corporation 

Royal Canadian Mint 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The 

•Seaway International Bridge Corporation, Ltd, The 

Teleglobe Canada 

Uranium Canada, Limited 

Vancouver Port Corporation 

Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corporations 
expected to be repaid by the Government 









Balance at 






Net 








Non- 




beginning of 






income/ 


Other 


Balance at 


Financial 


financial 


Total 


period 


Income 


Expenses 


loss(-) 


adjustments 


end of period 


991,423 


232,475 


1,223,898 


129,117 


336,962 


374.172 


-37,210 


28.943 


120,850 


1,086,796 


293,872 


1,380,668 


-325,726 


166,532 


716,000 


-549,468 


4.552 


-870,642 


720,000 


1,206,000 


1,926,000 


-910,012 


769,000 


1,004,000 


-235,000 


404.614 


-740,398 


9,178 


59,883 


69,061 


28,355 








48.155 


76.510 


2,307 


7 


2,314 


2,647 




9,398 


- 9,398 


8.749 


1.998 


3,912 


8 


3,920 


91 


792 


31,863 


-31,071 


31.677 


697 


3,537 




3,537 


1,524 




26,464 


-26,464 


26.987 


2.047 


10,033,941 


388,119 


10,422,060 


-372.333 


836,513 


2,041,007 


-1,204,494 


1,066.377 


-510.450 


4,053 


45,971 


50,024 


13,169 








31,618 


44.787 


22,975 


136,856 


159,831 


256,291 


27,199 


30,264 


-3,065 


-141,824 


111.402 


178,716 


1,853,749 


2,032,465 


1,645,492 


2,137,480 


2,482,006 


-344,526 


318,788 


1.619.754 


10,522 


92,617 


103,139 


65,770 


4,021 


2,965 


1.056 


18,964 


85.790 


40,044 


611.080 


651,124 


386,711 


228,463 


1,100,572 


-872,109 


899,083 


413.685 


180,694 


190.646 


371,340 


23,898 


720,572 


718,440 


2.132 


1,632 


27 662 


49,857 


58,450 


108.307 


-37,369 


560,000 


923,975 


-363,975 


380.810 


-20.534 


5,284 


571 


5,855 


-2,353 


4,412 


48,369 


-43,957 


48,206 


1.896 


830 




830 


360 




18,073 


-18,073 


18,407 


694 


879 




879 


549 


87 




87 


-1 


635 


1,026 


16 


1.042 


736 


1,607 


2,196 


-589 


289 


436 


9,990 


4,522 


14.512 


-181 


58,370 


59,872 


-1,502 


- 1,298 


-2.981 


860 


346 


1.206 


10,500 


8,610 


50.923 


-42,313 


36,500 


4.687 


3,676,296 


1,373,043 


5,049.339 


-307 


5,362,297 


5,362,297 




2,885 


2.578 


2,207 


75 


2,282 


185 


230 


3,973 


-3,743 


5,404 


1.846 


30,240 


365,505 


395,745 


306,079 


163,311 


243,765 


-80.454 


118,883 


344.508 


339 


316 


655 


-2,504 




13,521 


-13,521 


13,876 


-2.149 


6,230,895 


458,179 


6,689,074 


207,118 


688.239 


676,933 


11,306 


-8,510 


209.914 


4,911,496 


28,725 


4,940,221 


75,389 


516,183 


131,969 


384,214 


-440,720 


18.883 


1,466,728 


12,813 


1,479,541 


-82,128 


221,162 


216.805 


4,357 


- 7,597 


-85.368 


6,773 


20,472 


27,245 


1,448 


42,006 


40,746 


1,260 


-3,944 


-1.236 


2,127 


46,752 


48,879 




10,412 


9,222 


1,190 


26,985 


28,175 








15.383 


1,395 


20 


1,375 


-16,758 




5,056 


119,488 


124,544 


55,194 


63,549 


46,583 


16,966 


3,363 


75,523 


50,669 


377,108 


427,777 


346,364 


10,041 


92.333 


-82,292 


114,831 


378,903 


16,332 


238,670 


255,002 


18,792 


77,070 


73.818 


3,252 


3,753 


25,797 


23,440 


49,561 


73,001 


13,598 


40,979 


36,922 


4,057 


-868 


16,787 


5,334 


15,587 


20,921 




19,187 


36,229 


-17,042 


3,782 


-13,260 


1,294,038 


7,569,683 


8,863.721 


1.313,800 


4,950,525 


4,288,679 


661,846 


-211,990 


1,763,656 


19,032 


214 


19.246 


29,582 


1,534 


11,703 


- 10,169 


10,452 


29,865 


1,148 


40,877 


42.025 




10,307 


8,538 


1,769 


77,971 


79,740 


1,025 


72,755 


73,780 




8,919 


7,899 


1,020 


50,224 


51,244 


4,475 


51,156 


55,631 


41,967 


638,269 


627,606 


10,663 


5,751 


58,381 


14,366 


600,793 


615,159 


19,780 


66,459 


72,949 


-6,490 


4,957 


18.247 


311 


41 


352 


83 


1,459 


1,496 


-37 




46 


258,117 
(1) 


323.031 


581,148 
(I) 


349,513 


235,956 


133.379 


102,577 


-21.495 


430,595 


13,012 


170,787 


183,799 


113,284 


96,188 


83,451 


12,737 


4,088 


130,109 


31.390.280 


17.110.819 


48.501.099 


3.739.856 
1,150,000 


19.086.297 


21.861.395 


-2.775.098 


2.966.551 
50,000 


3.931.309 
1,200,000 


31,390.280 


17.110.819 


48.501.099 


4.889.856 


19.086.297 


21.861.395 


-2.775.098 


3.016.551 


5.131.309 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
TABLE 7.5 



7*23 



DETAILS OF GOVERNMENT OF CANADA FINANCIAL INTEREST IN CROWN CORPORATIONS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, \9%5— Concluded 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Atseti 



Unrecorded nnancial interest 



Rnancial 



Non- 
financial 



Total 



Non-agent Crown coriwrations 

Air Canada 477.405 1,974.31 1 

Atlantic Pilotage Authority 536 735 

Bank of Canada 4.259.764 95.737 

Canada Council 67.301 10,082 

Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security .... 228 56 

Canadian National Railway System 676.377 6,583,884 

CN Marine Inc 25.604 296,725 

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority, Ltd 1,313 49 

Harbourfront Corporation 7,883 

International Centre for Ocean Development 

International Development Research Centre 2,175 3,351 

'Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated. 

The 5.156 22.174 

Laurentian Pilotage Authority 3,149 1,305 

Mingan Associates, Ltd 

National Arts Centre Corporation 817 4,668 

Pacific Pilotage Authority 3.828 1.080 

St Anthony Fisheries Limited 1.549 8 

Societa a responsibilita limitata Immobiliare San Sebas- 

tiano 1,150 

Standards Council of Canada 4,723 456 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 40,166 607,439 

5.577.974 9.603,210 

Total financial interest 36,968,254 26,714,029 

The accompanying notes to Table 7.4 are an integral part of this table. 
<•> Less than $500. 



2,451.716 

1,271 

4,355,501 

77,383 

284 

7,260,261 

322,329 

1,362 

7,883 

5,526 

27.330 
4.454 

5.485 

4.908 

1,557 

1,150 

5,179 

647.605 

I5.ISI.I84 



Balance at 

beginning of 

period 



280.447 

554 

486,976 

65.141 

707.181 

-2.020 

-8.461 

-33,966 
537 

7,746 

2,760 

76 

1,150 

3,357 

591,309 

1102.787 



Net 
income/ Other Balance at 

Expenses loss ( - ) adjustments end of period 



2,538.567 
5,625 

8.848 

13 

4,158,377 

45,338 

10,851 

9,155 

3,581 

6,638 
25,567 

13,226 

20,720 

36 



1,333 

103.180 

6.951.055 



2.513,359 

5.838 

129,379 

82,377 

326 

4.783,145 

184,382 

11,421 

28,053 



9,500 
27,333 



27.502 
20,565 



6,638 

259.592 

8.173.959 



25,208 

-213 

-129,379 

-73,529 

-313 

-624,768 

- 139,044 

-570 

-18,898 



84,549 -80,968 



- 2,862 
-1,766 

-14,276 
155 
36 



- 5,305 
-156,412 
- 1.222.904 



- 45.783 

57 

132,165 

80,974 

1,549 

485,263 

428.593 

-42 

32,684 

83,034 

2,552 
1,645 

7,235 

-22 

I 



6,262 

203,546 

I.4I9.7I3 



63,682,283 



6.992,643 26,037,352 30,035,354 -3.998.002 4.436,264 



259.872 

398 

489.762 

72.586 

1.236 

567,676 

289.549 

- 2.632 
13.786 

- 6.395 

- 34.276 
416 

705 

2.893 

113 

1.150 

4.314 

638.443 

2.299.596 



7.430.905 



Consolidation of Crown Corporations with 
GoYernment 

Note 5 to the Audited Financial Statements, in Section 2 of 
this volume, presents a summarized consolidated statement of 
assets and liabilities together with gross revenue and 
expenditure. 

In accordance with the accounting policy stated in Note l(i) 
to the Audited Financial Statements, the assets, liabilities, 
revenues and expenditures reported in the separate flnancial 
statements of Crown corporations are not consolidated in the 
Government's fmancial statements. As a consequence, reve- 
nues and expenditures reported in the Government's state- 
ments include, respectively, amounts received from and paid to 
these corporations, but exclude corporate revenues and expen- 
ditures resulting from transactions with parties other than the 
Government. Similarly, assets and liabilities reported in the 
Government's statements include, respectively, amounts owing 
from and payable to these corporations, but exclude corporate 
assets and liabilities resulting from transactions with parties 
other than the Government. 

However, the Government provides consolidated informa- 
tion which entails the elimination of transactions between the 
Government and Crown corporations and between Crown 
corporations themselves. 

Before balances and transactions between the Government 
and Crown corporations and between Crown corporations 
themselves can be eliminated. Crown corporations' accounts 



must be adjusted to the Government's modified cash basis of 
accounting. In order to arrive at Crown corporation balances 
and transactions on the Government's modified cash basis of 
accounting, adjustments must be made for differences in 
accounting policies. The differences include accounts receiv- 
able, fixed assets, inventories, prepaid expenses, deferred reve- 
nues and credits, and other items not recorded on the Govern- 
ment's Statement of Assets and Liabilities. Similarly, revenue 
must be accounted for strictly on the cash basis and items such 
as depreciation, gain or loss on disposal of fixed assets includ- 
ing acquisitions and proceeds, are also reversed to revenue or 
expenditure. In addition, revenues and expenses of Crown 
corporations related to the Government and other Crown 
corporations which had been previously excluded for financial 
interest purposes are now included for consolidation purposes 
in order to be eliminated. 

All such amounts resulting from accounting policy differ- 
ences and additions are aggregated and deducted from the 
total financial interest figures shown on Tables 7.4 and 7.5 and 
are described as "Conversion to the Government's modified 
cash basis of accounting for consolidation purposes". Govern- 
ment balances and transactions are then added. They are 
followed by eliminations of reciprocal assets, liabilities, reve- 
nues and expenditures between the Government and Crown 
corporations and Crown corporations themselves to arrive at 
consolidated totals. 



m. 



7*24 
TABLE 7.6 

CONSOLIDATION OF CROWN CORPORATIONS WITH GOVERNMENT 

(in thousands of dollars) 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Crown corporations 



Consolidated totals 



Crown 



Conversion 
to the Govern- 
ment's modi- 
fied cash 

basis of ac- 



Total 

on the 

modifled 

per Tables consolidation cash basis accumulated revenues and 

7.4 and 7.5 purposes of accounting deficit expenditures 



corporations counting for 



Government 
assets, liabi- 
lities, reve- 
nues, expen- 
ditures and 



Elimi- 
nation of 
reciprocal 

assets, 
liabilities. 



Crown 
corporations Government Total 



29,714,064 



18,797,323 



48,511.387 



29,714,064 18,797,323 48,511,387 



16,563,816 

16,946,582 
14,523,978 



} 172.113.246 



58,660,990 



16,946,582 
73,184,968 



ASSETS 

Financial assets 36,968,254 -7,254,190 29,714,064 

41,186,302-22,388,979 
Non-financial assets 26,714,029 -26,714,029 

Total assets 63,682.283-33.968.219 29.714,064 41,186,302-22,388,979 

LIABILITIES 

Unmatured debt 16,563,816 16,563,816 

172,431,490-16,882,060 
Bank of Canada notes in circulation 
and amounts due depositors 16,946,582 16.946.582 

Other liabilities 14.941,489 -417,511 14,523,978 

60,202,793 -1,541 ,803 

Total liabilities 

NET ASSETS/LIABILITIES (-) 

Obligations to the Government 

Share capital and contributed surplus 

Claims against the Government 

ACCUMULATED DEFICIT. BEGIN- 
NING OF YEAR 6.992.643-31.854,213 -24,861,570 

-154,530,545 3,680,000 
REVENUES 26,037,352 10,076,605 36,113,957 -10,698,859 

70,723,797 -5,332,380 
EXPENDITURES 30,035.354 7.336.836 37,372.190 -6.463.217 

107.641.233 -9.722.397 
Other adjustments 4.436.264 -4,436,264 

ACCUMULATED DEFICIT, END OF 
YEAR 7,430,905-33,550,708 -26,119,803 -191,447,981 3,834,375 



48,451,887 


-417,511 


48,034,376 


232,634,283-18,423,863 


48,034,376 


214,210,420 


262,244.796 


15,230,396 - 


-33,550,708 


-18,320,312 ■ 


-191,447,981 -3,965,116 - 


-18,320.312 


-195,413,097 


-213.733.409 


16,475,949 

9,746,030 

-18,422,488 




16.475.949 

9.746.030 

-18.422,488 


-16,475,949 

-9,746,030 

18,422,488 








7,799,491 




7,799,491 


-7,799,491 









-24,861.570 



25,415.098 



30.908,973 



U 175,712, 
150,850,545j 



115 



65,391.417 



97,918.836/ 



90.806.515 



128.827,809 



■30.355.445 -183.377.964 -213.733,409 



15,230,396-33,550,708 -18,320,312-191,447,981 -3,965,116-30,355,445 -183,377,964 -213,733,409 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

Financial Assistance under Budgetary 
Appropriations to Crown Corporations 

Table 7.7 summarizes financial assistance under budgetary 
appropriations for both agent and non-agent Crown corpora- 
tions. It should be read in conjunction with Table 7.4. The 
purpose for which payments have been made under budgetary 
appropriations is segregated between: (a) amounts to cover 
operating expenses and (b) amounts for capital expenditures. 

All amounts reported represent charges to appropriations or 
authorities approved by Parliament. 

TABLE 7.7 



7*25 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE UNDER BUDGETARY APPROPRIATIONS TO CROWN CORPORATIONS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 



Financial assistance Purpose 

under 
budgetary Capital 
_^ appropriations^'^ Operations expenditures 

s s s 

Agent Crown corporations 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 325.535,698 294.435,698 31.100,000 

Canada Development Investment Corporation*^) 450,000,000 450,000,000 

Canada Harbour Place Corporation 48il0o!o00 ' 48,100,000 

Canada Lands Company (Mirabel) Limited 8,100,011 7,600,000 500^011 

Canada Lands Company (Le Vieux-Port de Montreal) Limited 31,609,000 2,796,000 28,813,000 

Canada Lands Company (Vieux-Port de Quebec) Inc 26,986,570 8J941000 18!792!570 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 1,965,063,328 1,965,063,328 

Canada Museums Construction Corporation Inc 31,495,000 2,716,000 28,779,000 

Canada Ports Corporation 35!l67!o70 35!l67io70 

Canada Post Corporation 515,831,228 515,831,228 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 904,927,000 813,150,000 91,777,000 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 17,617,060 17,617,060 

Canadian Dairy Commission 332,489,278 332,489,278 

Canadian Film Development Corporation 45,571,493 45i57li493 

Canadian Livestock Feed Board 18,658,378 18!61o!378 48,000 

Canadian Patents and Development Limited 350,000 350,000 

Canadian Sports Pool Corporation 36,500,000 36,50o[oOO 

Canadian Wheat Board, The 130,812,203 1 14,669,967 16,142,236 

Canagrex 5,400,000 5,400,000 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 107,572,756 20,647,963 86,924,793 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 14,487,807 14,487,807 

Farm Credit Corporation 10,282,591 10,282,591 

Federal Business Development Bank 31,107,981 31,107,981 

National Capital Commission 97,054,935 59,529,935 37,525,000 

Petro-Canada 60,500,000 60,500,000 

Canertech Inc<5> 17,039,532 17,039,532 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The 3.000.000 3,000,000 

5,271,258.919 4.882.757,309 388.501,610 

Non-agent Crown corporations 

Atlantic Pilotage Authority 90,403 90,403 

Canada Council 72,614,000 72,614,000 

Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security 1,500,000 1,500,000 

Canadian National Railway System 80,230,767 80,230,767 

CN Marine IncW 164,707,000 164,707,000 

Great Lakes Pilotage Authority, Ltd 263,064 263,064 

Harbourfront Corporation 20,912.000 347,000 20,565.000 

International Centre for Ocean Development 800.000 800.000 

International Development Research Centre 81.000.000 81,000,000 

Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated, The 4,387,000 4,387,000 

Laurentian Pilotage Authority 1,476,672 1,476,672 

National Arts Centre Corporation 14,932,000 14,932.000 

Standards Council of Canada 6.612.000 6,612.000 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 537,516,230 473,418,552 64,097,678 

987.041.136 902.378.458 84.662.678 

Total 6,258,300,055 5,785,135,767 473,164,288 

*') Excludes grants and contributions paid to agent and non-agent Crown corporations where they qualify as members of a general class of recipients. 

<^' On March 30, 1984, Canadair Limited changed its name to Canadair Financial Corporation Inc following a financial restructuring. During the fiscal year, Canadair 

Financial Corporation Inc and The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, Limited respectively received assistance under budgetary appropriations of $300,000,000 and 

$150,000,000. 
*^* Canertech Inc, is an unconsolidated subsidiary of Petro-Canada. 
<*' On January 1, 1985, the Government assumed control of CN Marine Inc from Canadian National Railway System. 



7 • 26 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1 984-85 

Contingent Liabilities of Crown Corporations 

Table 7.8 summarizes the contingent liabilities of Crown 
corporations. A contingent liability is defined as a potential 
liability which may become an actual liability when one or 
more future events occur or fail to occur. 

TABLE 7.8 

CONTINGENT LIABILITIES OF CROWN CORPORATIONS 
AS AT MARCH 31, 1985 

March 31, 1985 
S 

Canada Development Investment Corporation — conditional repurchase agreements of aircraft sold by The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, 

Limited 87,000,000 

Canada Lands Company (Vieux-Port de Quebec) Inc — potential tax claims on purchase of properties 203,000 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation^ — litigation re: insulation program 48,000,000 

Canada Museums Construction Corporation Inc — contract disputes 4,800,000 

Canada Ports Corporation — miscellaneous litigation 6,000,000 

Canadian Commercial Corporation — contract damages 8,600,000 

Canadian Film Development Corporation — contract dispute 370,000 

Cape Breton Development Corporation — loan guarantees 56,210,000 

Export Development Corpwration — loan guarantees 194,522,000 

Federal Business Development Bank — bank loan guarantees 18,903,000 

Loto Canada Inc — litigation, ticket wholesalers 4,175,000 

Montreal Port Corporation — miscellaneous litigation 5,800,000 

National Capital Commission — miscellaneous litigation 29,406,767 

Port of Quebec Corporation — miscellaneous litigation 5,500,000 

Royal Canadian Mint — alleged infringement of copyright 12,000,000 

Teleglobe Canada — potential liability re: retirement agreement 1,677,000 

Vancouver Port Corporation — miscellaneous litigation 2,000,000 

Total 485,166,767 



:i<XX^/y 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL 
GOVERNMENTS 

This group records loans to provinces made under relief acts 
and other legislation. 

Table 7.9 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the various types of loans and advances that have 
been made to provincial and territorial governments. 

TABLE 7.9 

PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENTS 



7-27 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



NEWFOUNDLANI>— 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrangements 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 
Special areas and highways agreement 

Total Newfoundland 

NOVA SCOTIA— 
Energy, Mines and Resources — 
Regional electrical interconnections 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 

Mainland Investments Limited 

Special areas and highways agreement 

Transport — 

Loading ramp, Yarmouth, NS 

Total Nova Scotia 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 
Regional electrical interconnections 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 

Atlantic Development Board carry-over 
projects 

Comprehensive development plan agree- 
ment 

Total Prince Edward Island 



3,661,214 






3,661,214 






26,269,301 


26,269,301 


37,071.621 


37,071,621 


10,802,320 


26,269,301 


5,591,233 


180,706 




5.410,527 


- 180,706 


- 163,669 


6,700,000 






6.700,000 






7,156,527 


80,504 


4,173 


7.080,196 


-76,331 


- 28,632 


49,378,275 


26.530.511 


37.075,794 


59.923.558 


10.545.283 


26,077.000 


1,065,990 


32,611 


1,728 


1,035,107 


- 30,883 


- 49,443 


80,866,242 


1,825,669 


130,513 


79,171,086 


-1,695,156 


-1,585,148 


38,317,354 


2,273,348 


446,710 


36,490,716 


-1,826,638 


-1,686,172 


120,249.586 


4.131,628 


578.951 


116.696.909 


- 3.552,677 


- 3.320,763 


169,627,861 


30,662,139 


37,654,745 


176,620,467 


6,992,606 


22.756,237 



2,577,950 



8,624,219 



224,596 

915,483 

237,103 

1,169,015 

2.546,197 



25,969 



22,666 



97,362 



17,008 
74,186 
23,521 
73,885 
188,600 



994 



2,555,284 



- 22.666 



- 20.558 



3,898,429 
3,099,777 
4,300,000 
4,822,677 
16,120.883 


500,691 
664,984 

239,735 
1,405.410 




3,397,738 
2,434,793 
4,300,000 
4,582,942 
14,715,473 


-500,691 
- 664,984 

-239,735 
- 1.405.410 


-468,145 
- 630.893 

-219,981 
- 1.319.019 


4,232.024 
44,737,183 

2,000,000 
26,685,191 
77.654.398 


131,070 
1,691,514 

500,000 
2,221,133 
4,543,717 


1,170 
117,336 

373,764 
492.270 


4,102,124 
43,163,005 

1,500,000 
24,837,822 
73.602.951 


-129,900 

-1,574,178 

-500,000 

- 1,847,369 

-4.051.447 


- 120.728 

- 1,480,919 
-500,000 

- 1,706,520 
-3.808.167 


57,342 


28,666 




2^,616 


- 28,666 


- 28,666 


96.410.573 


6,000,459 


492,270 


90,902,384 


-5,508.189 


-5,176,410 



2,581 



17,683 
20,264 



8,526.857 



210,169 

841,297 

213,582 

1.112,813 

2.377.861 



24,975 



-97.362 



89,079 



- 14,427 


-13,515 


-74,186 


- 68,055 


-23,521 


- 22,083 


- 56,202 


-53,214 


- 168,336 


- 156,867 



994 



-925 



11,704,003 
11.729.972 


149,852 
150.846 




11,554,151 
11.579.126 


- 149,852 

- 150.846 


-138,764 
- 139.689 


22,900,388 


436,808 


20,264 


22,483,844 


-416,544 


- 385,635 



7-28 

TABLE 7.9 

PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENTS— Co/i//«Me^ 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease (- ) 



1985 



1984 



NEW BRUNSWICK— 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Regional electrical interconnections 

Finance — 

Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Town of Oromocto 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry-over 

projects 

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 
Special areas and highways agreement 

Total New Brunswick 

QUEBEC— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agreement 

Total Quebec 

ONTARIO— 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Total Ontario 

MANITOBA— 

Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Advances 

Loans 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 
Regional electrical interconnections 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrangements 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agreement 

Total Manitoba 



4.887,043 



6,591,419 


159,118 


6,240,974 


282,943 


5,375,000 




109,035 


64,771 


9,687,262 


100,681 


28,003,690 


607.513 


899,762 


31,332 


44,534,019 


1,633,928 


43,847,163 


1,910,406 


89.280,944 


3.575.666 



122,171,677 



61.300,779 
53,184,096 
70,300,000 
91.314.928 
276.099.803 

103,407,699 



379,507,502 



4,183,179 



2,969,244 

2.969,244 
2,194,011 



5,163,255 



2,748 



9,792 
12,540 



388 
89,108 

89.496 



4,887,043 



6,435,049 
5,958,031 
5,375,000 
44,264 
9,596,373 
27,408.717 



868,818 
42,989,199 
41,936,757 
85.794.774 



-156,370 
- 282,943 

-64,771 

- 90,889 

-594.973 



- 30,944 

•1,544,820 

1,910,406 

3,486,170 



41,064 



- 147,350 

- 302,758 

-61,434 
- 87,292 

- 598,834 



- 28.785 
1,459.653 
1,769,347 
3,257.785 



102,036 



118,090,534 



4,081,143 



3,897,683 



315,478 



61,300,779 






50.214,852 


- 2,969,244 


-2,818,452 


70,300,000 






91,314.928 






273,130.559 


- 2.969.244 


- 2,818.452 


101,529,166 


-1,878.533 


-1,735,703 



315,478 



374.659.725 



•4.847.777 



4,554,155 



11.075.671 


852.594 




10,223,077 


- 852,594 


- 797,402 


29.541.839 


5,383,003 




24,158,836 


- 5,383,003 


-5.152.648 


1.963.092 


195,468 




1,767,624 


- 195,468 


- 183.632 


36.738.522 


2,437,246 




34,301,276 


- 2,437,246 


-2.241,373 


79.319.124 


8,868,311 




70,450,813 


-8,868.311 


-8,375,055 


3,247 


8,094 


5.239 


392 


- 2.855 


-130,675 


7.131,356 


43,058 


3.247 


7,091,545 


-39,811 


- 1,434,324 


7.134.603 


51.152 


8.486 


7.091.937 


- 42.666 


-1,564.999 


127,627,506 


1,332,268 


3,894,455 


130,189,693 


2.562.187 


6,489,032 


4,647,346 


388,313 




4,259,033 


-388.313 


- 362,977 


2,712,000 


2,712,000 






-2.712.000 


2.712.000 


5.159.561 


704,851 




4,454,710 


-704,851 


- 668,479 


4.653.140 


396,460 




4,256,680 


- 396,460 


- 372,228 


2.611.288 


105,797 




2,505,491 


- 105,797 


-97,736 


19.783.335 


4,307,421 




15.475.914 


- 4,307,421 


1.210.580 


3.201,877 


209.563 


42,443 


3,034,757 


-167,120 


-154,531 


157.747.321 


5.900.404 


3,945.384 


155,792,301 


-1,955,020 


5.980,082 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
TABLE 7.9 

PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL GOVEKNUEHIS— Concluded 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



7*29 



Net increase or decrease (- ) 



1985 



1984 



SASKATCHEWAN— 
Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Advances 128,820 

Loans 6,324,864 

South Saskatchewan River project — 

Treasury bills 6,500,000 

12,953.684 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 868,643 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrangements 68,739,000 

Municipal Development and Loan Board ... 2,508,229 

72,115,872 
Total Saskatchewan 85,069,556 

ALBERTA— 

Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Loans 310,232 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 3,725,733 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 6,377,429 

Special development loans program 4,000,000 

Winter capital projects fund 4,522,627 

18,625,789 
Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agreement 2,9 1 0,65 1 

Total Alberta 21,846,672 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 1 1,030,168 

Municipal Development and Loan Board .... 8,601,212 

Special development loans program 18,967,015 

Winter capital projects fund 15,446,912 

Total British Columbia 54,045,307 

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans pro- 
gram 20,991 

Winter capital projects fund 273,579 

294,570 
Indian Affairs and Northern Development — 
Government of the Northwest Territories 

Total Northwest Territories 

YUKON TERRITORY— 

. Indian Affairs and Northern Development- 
Government of the Yukon Territory 

Yukon Territory small business loans 

Total Yukon Territory 

Accounts without current transactions 

Total 1,213,590,892 



114,384 
306,937 


13,685 
107,800 


28.121 
6,125.727 


- 100,699 
-199.137 


-722.298 
93.111 


1,960,000 
2.381.321 


121.485 


4,540.000 
10.693.848 


- 1.960.000 
-2.259.836 


- 2.023.500 

- 2.652,687 


63,613 
22,913,000 

572,624 
23,549,237 


687 
687 


805,717 

45,826,000 

1,935,605 

48,567,322 


- 62,926 

-22,913,000 

- 572,624 

- 23,548.550 


-78,169 

-22,913.000 

- 545.802 

- 23.536,971 



25,930,558 



313,500 
978,540 

282,494 
1,574,534 

185,941 



1,760,475 



801,586 
1,406,915 

2,022,578 
891,537 



5,122,616 



122,172 



59,261,170 



25,808,386 -26,189,658 



310,232 



3,412.233 


-313,500 


- 293,672 


5.398,889 


- 978,540 


- 984,873 


4,000,000 






4,240,133 


- 282,494 


- 268,935 


7.051,255 


- 1.574,534 


- 1.547,480 



28,916 



2,753,626 



-157,025 



- 160,789 



28,916 



20,115,113 



1,731,559 



1,708,269 



309 
56,974 



10,228.582 


-801,586 


-735,288 


7,194.297 


-1,406,915 


-1.337.451 


16,944.746 


- 2,022,269 


-1,852.188 


14.612,349 


- 834,563 


- 699.630 



57.283 



48,979,974 



- 5,065,333 



4,624,557 



1,606 


85 


19,470 


-1,521 


- 1.421 


15,222 


2,013 


260,370 


-13,209 


- 12.296 


16,828 


2,098 


279,840 


- 14.730 


- 13.717 



15.241,111 


14,826,853 




414,258 


- 14,826,853 


-2,217,959 


15,535,681 


14,843,681 


2,098 


694,098 


-14,841,583 


-2,231.676 



9,025,522 
383,708 


640,921 
52,063 


30,437 


8,384,601 
362,082 


-640,921 
-21,626 


-7,163,170 
-61,973 


9,409,230 


692,984 


30,437 


8,746,683 


- 662,547 


-7,225.143 


-125,004 



109,564,869 



42,771,083 



1,146,797,106 



- 66,793,786 - 35,756,926 



7'30 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Federal-provincial employment loans program 

Loans have been made, to provinces, provincial agencies and 
municipalities, to assist in the creation of employment. The 
loan authority provides for the forgiveness of that portion of 
the principal amount equal to 75% of normal direct on-site 
payroll costs incurred and paid before June 30, 1972. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 6.5% to 7.41% per 
annum, and are repayable either in annual instalments over 10 
to 20 years, or at maturity, with final repayments between 
April 1, 1988 and November 30, 1994. 

Federal-provincial flscal arrangements 

These amounts represent overpayments in respect of provin- 
cial equalization entitlements under the Federal-Provincial 
Fiscal Arrangements and Established Programs Financing 
Act. These overpayments are non-interest bearing and are 
recovered in the subsequent year. 

Municipal Development and Loan Board 

Under the Municipal Development and Loan Act, loans 
have been made, to provinces and municipalities, to augment 
or accelerate municipal capital works programs. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5.25% to 5.625% per 
annum, and are repayable in annual or semi-annual instal- 
ments over 15 to 50 years, with final instalments between 
April 1, 1985 and March 31, 2016. 

Special development loans program 

Loans have been made, to provinces, provincial agencies and 
municipalities, to assist in the creation of employment. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5.91% to 7.54% per 
annum, and are repayable either in annual or semi-annual 
instalments over 10 to 20 years, or at maturity, with final 
repayments between April 1, 1987 and March 30, 1993. 

Winter capital projects fund 

Loans have been made, to provinces, provincial agencies and 
municipalities, to assist in the creation of employment. There 
is provision for the forgiveness of that portion of the principal 
amount equal to 50% of normal direct on-site payroll costs for 
the duration of the loan program, plus 50% for the periods 
December-May 1973, 1974 and 1975. Finance Vote LI 3a, 
Appropriation Act No 1, 1974, authorized in fiscal years 
subsequent to March 31, 1976, the consolidation of any loan 
made pursuant to that authority, which may include the 
amount of interest accrued thereon to the date of 
consolidation. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 7.11% to 9.84% per 
annum, and are repayable either in annual instalments over 5 
to 20 years, or at maturity, with final repayments between 
April 1, 1985 and February 28, 1999. 

Atlantic Development Board carry-over projects 

Loans have been made to finance certain water projects that 
were carried over from the Atlantic Development Board. 
Loans were made pursuant to terms and conditions of agree- 
ments between Canada and the provinces in the Atlantic 
region, with the approval of the Governor in Council. 



The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) bearing interest at the rate of 7.5% per annum, repay- 
able over 28 years at various anniversary amortization 
dates, with the final instalment on July 31, 1999, 
$48,338; and, 

(b) bearing interest at rates from 7.161% to 8.5% per 
annum, repayable over 30 years at various anniversary 
amortization dates, with final instalments between 
November 21, 1998 and April 1, 2006, $5,982,686. 

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 

Loans have been made to the Atlantic provinces, to assist in 
the generation of electrical energy by steam driven generators 
in the provinces, and in the control and transmission of electric 
energy. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 4.5% to 8.5% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal annual instalments over 29 
to 40 years, with final instalments between March 31, 1992 
and March 31, 2014. 

Special areas and highways agreement 

Loans have been made to finance development of commu- 
nity and industrial infrastructure projects for special areas, 
and for highway development, pursuant to terms and condi- 
tions of agreements between Canada and the provinces, with 
the approval of the Governor in Council. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5.768% to 10.164% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal annual instalments over 5 
to 30 years, with final instalments between March 31, 1986 
and March 31, 2009. 

Regional electrical interconnections 

Loans have been made to assist in financing regional electri- 
cal interconnections, under agreements with the Provinces of 
Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward 
Island, and the Government of Canada. 

During the year, additional loans were authorized by 
Energy, Mines and Resources Vote L30, Appropriation Acts 
No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 9% to 15.625% per 
annum, and are repayable in annual instalments over 29 to 31 
years, with final instalments between December 31, 2008 and 
October 31,2009. 

The annual instalment from the Province of New Bruns- 
wick, due March 31, 1985, was received in 1985-86. 

Mainland Investments Limited 

Loans have been made to the Province of Nova Scotia for 
the purchase of shares of Mainland Investments Limited, in 
accordance with an agreement between Canada and Nova 
Scotia, pursuant to Section 8 of the Special Areas Act. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 7% per annum, and are 
repayable over 15 years, with the final instalment on February 
28, 1988. During the first 5 years, interest only is payable, and 
during the subsequent 10 years, equal annual instalments of 
principal and accrued interest are required on March 30. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 
Loading ramp, Yarmouth, NS 

Loans have been made to the Province of Nova Scotia, for 
the construction of an end-loading ramp at Yarmouth, Nova 
Scotia. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 8% per annum, and are 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 15 years, with the 
final instalment on September 14, 1985. 

Comprehensive development plan agreement 

Loans have been made to Prince Edward Island, to assist in 
financing the realization of a comprehensive and co-ordinated 
development plan of the province, pursuant to an agreement 
with the province, whose territory has been designated a 
"special rural development area". 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) repayable over 30 years in equal instalments due at 
various anniversary dates, bearing interest at rates from 
6.688% to 9.375% per annum, with final instalments 
between March 25, 2000 and March 27, 2005, 
$4,891,000; and, 

{b) repayable in equal annual instalments over 30 years, 
bearing interest at rates from 6.688% to 9.375% per 
annum, with final instalments between March 31, 2001 
and March 31, 2005, $6,663,151. 

Town of Oromocto 

Capital assistance loans have been made to the Town of 
Oromocto, New Brunswick. 

The loans bear interest at rates of 5.25%, 5.375% and 
5.625% per annum, and are repayable in equal semi-annual 
instalments over 20 years, with final instalments between July 
1, 1985 and April 1, 1986. 

Agricultural service centres 

Loans and advances have been made to provincial and 
municipal authorities, to assist in the construction or expansion 
of water supply and waste disposal facilities in key agriculture 
service centres, which are essential to rural adjustment and 
urban development in the agricultural portion of the Prairie 
region. 

During the year, additional loans and advances were author- 
ized by Agriculture Vote L20, Appropriation Acts No 1 and 
No 2, 1984-85. 

Advances 

The amounts shown as advances represent outlays made on 
incomplete projects. When a project is completed, the 
advances are transferred to the loan account. 

Upon completion of projects, interest is calculated and 
added to the amount of advances being transferred to loans in 
accordance with the terms and conditions of the agreements 
between Canada and the provinces, with the approval of the 
Governor in Council. 

Loans 

This account records amounts transferred from the advances 
account when projects are completed. 



7'3I 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) repayable in equal annual instalments over 20 years, ^ 
bearing interest at rates from 6.747% to \3A167c per 
annum, with final instalments between March 30, 1992 
and March 30, 2003, $13,217,272; and, 

(b) repayable in equal annual instalments over 20 years, 
bearing interest at rates from 9.593% to 13.466% per 
annum, with final instalments between March 31, 1999 
and March 31, 2001, $310,232. No loan repayments 
were received from the Province of Alberta since 
1980-81. 

South Saskatchewan River project — Treasury bills 

Treasury bills are received as payment of the Province of 
Saskatchewan's share of certain expenditures on the South 
Saskatchewan River project. 

The Treasury bills bear interest at rates from 5% to 5.875% 
per annum, and are repayable in semi-annual instalments, with 
the final instalment on December 31, 1986. 

Government of the Northwest Territories 

Loans have been made to the Government of the Northwest 
Territories, for the following purposes: 







Receipts 


Payments 








and other 


and other 






April 1/1984 


credits 


charges 


March 31/1985 




$ 


S 


S 


S 


Second mortgage.! 


160,062 


9,236 




150,826 


Low cost housing 


306,707 


43,275 




263,432 


Development of new 










sub-divisions at 










Hay River 


57,409 


57,409 






Establishment of the 










Capital at Yellow- 










knife 


96,237 


96,237 






Outside parties — 










Various 


14,620,696 


14,620,696 








15,241,111 


14,826,853 




414,258 



The loans bear interest at an annual rate equal to the rate 
established by the Minister of Finance in respect of Crown 
corporations' borrowings during the period in which the loans 
were made. Interest rates are presently from 5.125% to 8.875% 
per annum. The loans are repayable in equal annual instal- 
ments over 20 to 25 years, with final instalments between 
April 1, 1985 and August 27, 1996. 

Government of the Yukon Territory 

Loans have been made to the Government of the Yukon 
Territory, for the following purposes: 





April 1/1984 


Receipts 

and other 

credits 


Payments 
and other 
charges 


March 31/1985 


Second mortgage 

Low cost housing 

Capital expenditures.. 
Outside parties — 

Capital projects 

City of Whitehorse— 

Capital projects 


$ 

126,916 

476,270 

1,045,561 

7,218,492 

158,283 


S 

9,814 
33,486 
62,477 

484,323 

50,821 


S 


S 

117,102 
442,784 
983,084 

6,734.169 

107,462 




9,025,522 


640,921 




8,384,601 



7'32 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



The loans bear interest at an annual rate equal to the rate 
established by the Minister of Finance in respect of Crown 
corporations' borrowings during the period in which the loans 
were made. Interest rates are presently from 3.875% to 12.5% 
per annum. The loans are repayable in equal annual instal- 
ments over 2 to 35 years, with final instalments between April 
1, 1985 and March 31, 2004. 

Yukon Territory small business loans 

Loans have been made for the establishment or expansion of 
small businesses in the Yukon Territory. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $5,000,000. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 9% to 1 2% per annum, 
and are repayable in annual instalments over 10 years, with 



final instalments between April 1, 1985 and March 31, 1988. 
The repayment period may be extended with the approval of 
the Minister of Finance. 



NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS 
INCLUDING DEVELOPING COUNTRIES 

Loans to national governments consist mainly of the loan to 
the Government of the United Kingdom under the United 
Kingdom Financial Agreement Act, special loan assistance to 
developing countries, and loans for development of export 
trade (administered by the Export Development Corporation). 

Table 7.10 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the loans and advances that were made to national 
governments including developing countries. 



TABLE 7.10 

NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS INCLUDING DEVELOPING COUNTRIES 



Receipts and 
April 1/1984 other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



S $ $ 

China — Finance 49,426,118 

Greece — Finance 6,214,126 

Jamaica — 
Finance — 
Special program — Economic assistance 25,000,000 1,375,000 1,375,000 

United Kingdom — 
Finance — 
The United Kingdom Financial Agreement 

Act, 1946 538,965,143 26,930,952 

Deferred principal 94,990,863 

633.956.006 26.930.952 

Developing countries — 
External Affairs — Canadian International 
Development Agency — 
Special loan assistance 2,879,429,901 62,294,475 262,819,224 

Development of export trade (loans adminis- 
tered by the Export Development Corpora- 
tion)— External Affairs 620,702,932 24,908,192 23,492,153 

National Defence — 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization — 
Damage 'claims recoverable 2,160 126,881 156,927 

Total 4,214,731,243 115,635,500 287,843,304 



49,426,118 
6,214,126 

25,000,000 



512,034,191 

94,990,863 

607.025.054 



619,286,893 



32,206 



26,930,952 - 26,402,894 
26.930.952 - 26.402.894 



3,079,954,650 200,524.749 181,774,660 



1,416.039 11.835,846 



30,046 - 55,602 



4,386,939,047 172,207,804 167,152.010 



China 

A loan to China was authorized under the Export Credits 
Insurance Act. 



Greece 

A non-interest bearing loan to Greece was authorized by PC 
1932-2630. Parliamentary authority is required to write-off 
the balance. 



Jamaica — Economic assistance 

A loan has been made to the Government of Jamaica, to 
provide economic assistance. The maturity under the agree- 



ment is August 9, 1989. Interest at 11% per annum is payable 
annually on August 9. Up to August 9, 1989, the interest rate 
will be equal to the Crown corporations' 5 year borrowing rate. 

The agreement, as amended in 1984, provides for the defer- 
ment of one-half of the interest due on August 9, 1984 and is 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over the period February 
15, 1989 to August 15, 1993 and bears interest at a rate of 
13.5% per annum. 

United Kingdom 

The United Kingdom Financial Agreement Act, 1946 

Under authority of the United Kingdom Financial Agree- 
ment Act, a credit of $1,250,000,000 was extended to the 



I 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

Government of the United Kingdom which could have been 
drawn on at any time prior to December 31, 1951. The 
purpose of the credit was to facilitate purchases by the United 
Kingdom of goods and services in Canada and to assist the 
United Kingdom in meeting transitional post-war deficits in its 
current balance of payments, in maintaining adequate reserves 
of gold and dollars, and in assuming the obligations of mul- 
tilateral trade. No interest was payable prior to January 1, 
1951. The amount of the credit drawn by December 31, 1951 
was to be repaid in 50 annual instalments beginning on that 
date, with interest at the rate of 2% per annum, with the final 
instalment on December 3 1 , 2000. 

Deferred principal 

The agreement, as amended in 1957, provides for the defer- 
ment of interest in respect of the year 1956 and of seven 



7*33 

instalments of principal and interest after December 31, 1956, 
under certain conditions. Interest for 1956, and interest and 
principal for 1957, 1964, 1965, 1968 and 1976 were deferred. 
The maturity of the deferrals is to commence December 31, 
2001, and continue until December 31, 2006. 



Developing countries — Special loan assistance 

Special loan assistance is given to developing countries. 
During the year, additional loans were authorized by External 
Affairs Vote L45, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85. 

The following table presents the balances and transactions 
for the loans made to developing countries, together with their 
terms and conditions of repayments. 



April 1/1984 



Receipts 

and other 

credits 



Payments 
and other 
charges 



March 31/1985 



(a) 1 7 year term, 7 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
the final repayment in September 1997: 
Senegal 

(A) 20 year term, 5 year grace period, 5% interest per annum, 
with final repayments between September 2000 and March 
2001: 

Jamaica 

Turkey 

(c) 25 year term, 5 year grace period, 6% interest per annum, with 
the final repayment in March 2001: 
Nigeria 

{d) 30 year term, 7 year grace period, 3% interest per annum, 
with final repayments between March 1997 and September 
2011: 

Barbados 

Brazil 

Chile 

Colombia 

Cuba 

Dominican Republic 

Egypt 

Jamaica 

Korea 

Malaysia 

Nigeria 

Peru 

Salvador, El 

Trinidad 

Turkey 

(e) 35 year term, 5 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
final repayments between April 2001 and November 2005: 
Salvador, El 

if) 40 year term, 10 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
the final repayment in March 2008: 
Thailand 

ig) 50 year term, 10 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
final repayments between March 2013 and March 2034: 

Algeria 

Antigua ...._. 

Argentina 

Barbados 

Belize 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Burma 

Cameroun 

Chile 

Colombia 

Congo- Brazzaville 

Costa Rica 

Dominica 



911,680 



4,499,073 
30,821,574 
35.320.647 



1,061,289 



87,390 



3,304.624 



761,654 



87,500 



171,939 



16,667 



999.070 



4.499,073 
30.821,574 
35.320.647 



913Ji9 



17,553,990 


343.24! 


766,186 


17,976.935 


12.835,848 


553.298 


943,862 


13,226.412 


2.651,600 


182.870 




2,468,730 


19.895,817 


782.609 


873.042 


19,986,250 


9,557,882 


5.435 




9,552.447 


2,200,001 






2.200,001 


50,000.000 






50,000,000 


33.123.346 






33.123,346 


564.789 


21.723 




543,066 


13,078,977 


714,426 




12,364,551 


887,969 


53,258 




834,711 


340,970 


3,353 




337,617 


8,966,351 




294.176 


9,260.527 


7,216.969 


752.381 


424.132 


6,888.720 


9,850.000 






9.850.000 


88.724.509 


3.412.594 


3.301.398 


188.613.313 



3,132.685 



744.987 



52,203,349 


35.635,151 




16,568,198 


5,999,797 


75,000 




5,924,797 


625.333 


18,666 




606,667 


3.403.678 


30.750 


4.315.787 


7.688,715 


12.187,864 






12.187.864 


1,611,013 


21.197 




1.589.816 


742,431 


20.913 




721.518 


8,304,901 




1,301 


8,306,202 


106,936.495 


256,095 


24.758,056 


131,438,456 


3.352,727 


98.062 




3.254.665 


20,787,625 


439.642 




20.347.983 


21,376,421 




594,352 


21.970.773 


8,710,045 




6,005,450 


14.715.495 


1.838.883 






1.838.883 



7-34 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



April 1/1984 



Receipts 

and other 

credits 



Payments 
and other 
charges 



March 31/1985 



Dominican Republic 

East African Community^') 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

Gabon 

Ghana 

Grenada 

Guatemala 

Guyana 

Honduras 

India 

Indonesia 

Ivory Coast 

Jamaica 

Kenya 

Madagascar 

Malaysia 

Malta 

Mauritania 

Mexico 

Montserrat 

Morocco 

Nicaragua 

Nigeria 

Pakistan 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Philippines 

Salvador, El 

St Lucia 

St Vincent 

Senegal 

Sri Lanka 

Swaziland ' 

Thailand 

Tojgo 

Trinidad 

Tunisia 

Various Francophone'^^ 

Zaire 

Zambia 

Zimbabwe 

(A) 53 year term, 1 3 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
the final repayment in March 2025: 
Algeria 

(0 55 year term, 15 year grace period, non-interest bearing, with 
the final repayment in September 2036: 
Egypt 



8,619,789 

47,402,298 

11,513,234 

57,474,146 

1,335,988 

80,996,892 

850,000 

3,704,41 1 

35,329,729 

14,914,412 

613,654,610 

186,016,866 

49,040,386 

43,505,567 

105,998,185 

22.598,306 

341,788 

1,000,000 

4,199,062 

92,841 

683,815 

14,376,123 

5,511,088 

45,080,555 

551,880,836 

659,873 

5,221.512 

3,886,371 

1,200,000 

532,927 

1,145,000 

13,940,869 

166,465,044 

1,423,565 

33.747.453 

16.571.216 

3.661,482 

126.291,475 

1,677,258 

28,396,624 

74,968,055 

15,355,285 

2.649.345,498 



2,879,429,901 



Note: grace period refers to interval to first repayment of principal. 
''* Joint project involving Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. 
'^^ Joint project involving Mali and Senegal. 

Similar assistance has been provided to developing countries 
by way of subscriptions to the capital of the International 
Development Association in the amount of $1,898 million, and 
loans to other international financial institutions in the amount 
of $1,188 million. These amounts are reported later in this 
section under the heading "International Organizations". 

Development of export trade 

Pursuant to Section 3 1 of the Export Development Act, the 
Governor in Council may authorize the Corporation to make 
loans to foreign customers where the liability is for a term, or 
in an amount in excess of that normally assumed by the 
Corporation. Such loans are financed directly by payments out 
of the Consolidated Revenue Fund and are administered by 
the Corporation on behalf of the Government of Canada. 



$ 

182,290 
304,919 

544,556 



10,403,878 

1,900,087 

277,470 

575.027 

9.907 
12.490 

2.772 

59.922 

445.384 

4,722,547 

19,996 

3,728 



3.092 

99.300 
722.040 



114,236 
1,593.969 

12.689 

58.605.775 



S 

547,750 



44,600 
652,603 
284,109 

275,000 

740,479 

16,713,510 

64,369,940 

21,126,534 

11,733,698 

8,015,437 

4,364,176 

285.515 



534.378 
5.043.413 

28,240,880 

104,144 



240,885 
2,899.595 



998,293 

244,378 

8,188,202 

3,065,396 

214.387.861 



40,635.162 



4,407,413 



62,294,475 



262,819,224 



8,985,249 

47.402,298 

11,208,315 

57,518,746 

1,988,591 

80,736,445 

850,000 

3,979,411 

36,070,208 

31,627,922 

667,620,672 

205.243,313 

60,496.614 

51,521,004 

109,787,334 

22,883,821 

331,881 

987,510 

4,199,062 

90,069 

683.815 

14,850,579 

10,554,501 

44,635,171 

575,399,169 

639,877 

5,321,928 

3,886,371 

1.200,000 

529,835 

1,145,000 

14,082,454 

168,642.599 

1,423,565 

33,747,453 

16,571,216 

3.547,246 

125,695,799 

1,677,258 

28,628,313 

83,156,257 

18,420,681 

2.805.127.584 



40,635,162 



4,407,413 



3,079.954,650 



During the year, receipts and other credits included loan 
repayments of $22,984,192, while payments and other charges 
included loans of $9,321,257 and a valuation adjustment of 
$14,170,896 in respect of loans totalling $168,103,481 US. 
Interest of $27.1 million was received and credited to Non-tax 
revenue — Return on investments. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 3.25% to 10.5% per 
annum, and are repayable over 6 to 22 years, with final 
instalments between April 1, 1985 and March 25, 2008. 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization — Damage claims 
recoverable 

Article VIII of the NATO Status of Forces Agreement 
signed April 4, 1949, as amended, deals with claims for 
damages to third parties arising from accidents in which a 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7*35 



member of a visiting force is involved. This account is charged 
with the amount recoverable from other states, for claims for 
damages which took place in Canada, and is credited with 
recoveries. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no specific 
repayment terms. 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

This group records Canada's subscriptions to the capital of 
the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, 
the Caribbean Development Bank, the Inter-American De- 
velopment Bank, the International Bank for Reconstruction 
and Development (i.e. World Bank), the International De- 
velopment Association and the International Finance Corpora- 
tion. It also includes loans and advances to other international 
organizations. 



Capital subscriptions are made in part by the issuance of 
non-interest bearing, non-negotiable demand notes. The 
amounts advanced or loaned vary according to the needs of the 
organizations concerned, and the terms of the agreements. 

The net position of the Government vis-^-vis the internation- 
al organizations has been obtained by deducting from sub- 
scriptions, loans and advances, the non-interest bearing notes 
issued by Canada to these organizations. These notes, payable 
on demand, represent that portion of the investment by 
Canada in these organizations which has not yet been 
encashed by them. These notes are encashed subject to the 
financial requirements of these organizations. 

Table 7.1 1 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the subscriptions, loans and advances to international 
organizations. 



TABLE 7.11 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 

Receipts and Payments and 

April 1/1984 other credits other charges March 31/1985 1985 1984 

$ $ $ $ $ $ 

Canada's subscriptions to the capital of the — 

African Development Bank 23,420,175 11.710,088 35,130,263 11,710,088 11,710,087 

/.ew; notes payable 11,710,088 11,710,088 -373 105 

23.420.175 11.710.088 23.420.176 35.130.263 11.710.088 12.083.192 

Asian Development Bank 140,984,633 15,632,567 156,617,200 15,632,567 10.551.021 

L«5j; notes payable 21,277.533 3,770,376 4,376,789 20,671.120 -606.413 -606.414 

119.707.100 3.770,376 20.009.356 135.946.080 16.238.980 11.157.435 

Caribbean Development Bank 12,199,912 836,527 13,036,439 836,527 1,245,891 

L^jj; notes payable 2,131,573 500,000 1,631,573 -500,000 440,118 

10.068.339 1.336.527 11.404.866 1.336.527 805.773 

Inter-American Development Bank 125,798.655 18,610.765 144.409.420 18,610.765 12.903,312 

Le«; notes payable 40,987,777 9.656.907 6.333.270 44.311,414 3,323,637 4.776!557 

84.810.878 9.656.907 24.944,035 100.098.006 15.287.128 8.126.755 
International Bank for Reconstruction and 

Development 205,801.308 41.653.971 247,455.279 41,653,971 50,963,580 

L^m; notes payable 11,961,186 35,965,030 47,926,216 -11,961.186 11.959.459 

193.840,122 35.965.030 89.580,187 247.455.279 53.615.157 39.004.121 

International Development Association 1.730,088.061 167.700.000 1. 897,788,061 <" 167,700,000 128,601,000 

Z^5j; notes payable 546.588.190 167.700,000 185,704,800 528,583,390 -18,004.800 -93.802,700 

1.183.499.871 167.700,000 353,404.800 1.369.204.671 185,704.800 222.403.700 

International Finance Corporation 26,736,847 1.833.300 28.570.147 1.833,300 817,128 

1.642.083.332 228.802.401 514,528.381 1.927.809.312 285.725.980 294.398.104 

International financial institutions 1,024,261,989 275,490 164,234,209 I,188,220,708<'> 163,958,719 172.589,828 

L^m; notes payable 529,821,917 136,770.002 66,109,966 600,481.953 70,660,036 131,034,643 

494.440.072 137.045,492 230,344,175 587.738.755 93.298.683 41.555.185 

International Tin Council 4,500,000 4,500,000 

International Natural Rubber Agreement 5,981,756 744,229 5,237,527 -744.229 791 

International organizations and associations — 
Berne Union of the World Intellectual Prop- 
erty Organization 24.351 24.351 

Customs Co-operation Council 6.309 6.309 

Food and Agriculture Organization 613.422 613,422 

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 14,508 14,508 

Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative 

Organization 1,617 1,617 

International Atomic Energy Agency 66,712 1,056 65,656 -1,056 -5.743 

International Civil Aviation Organization 71.419 71,419 21.946 

International Labour Organization 68.666 68,666 

Paris Unioa of the World Intellectual Prop- 
erty Organization 37.899 7.292 45,191 7,292 8.517 

United Nations bonds 1.178.504 401.057 73,440 850,887 -327,617 -326,799 

United Nations Educational, Scientific and 

Cultural Organization 630.715 630.715 -49.804 

United Nations organizations 3.574.878 3.574,878 - 249.140 

World Health Organization 177.223 177,223 

6,466.223 402,113 80,732 6,144,842 -321.381 -601.023 

Total 2,153,471,383 366,994,235 744,953,288 2,531,430.436 377,959,053 335,353,057 

*'* The subscriptions to the Association and the loans to the international financial institutions are used to lend funds to developing countries at rates favourable to the 

borrowers. In addition, as described earlier in this section, under the heading "National Governments including Developing Countries", special loan assistance 
amounting to S3.080 million has also been provided to developing countries. 



7-36 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



African Development Bank 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the African Development Bank, as authorized by the Inter- 
national Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, 
the International Development (Financial Institutions) Con- 
tinuing Assistance Act, and External Affairs Vote L55, 
Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

At year end, authority had been granted for the purchase of 
4,200 paid-in shares and 12,600 callable shares. Instalment 
payments for the paid-in shares are to be made in non-interest 
bearing, non-negotiable demand notes. These notes are deduct- 
ed from subscriptions to show the net position of the Govern- 
ment vis-a-vis the Bank. 

During the year, transactions included additional subscrip- 
tions in non-interest bearing demand notes. 

As at March 31, 1985, Canada's instalment payments 
amounted to $35,130,263 for 2,520 paid-in shares. The 12,600 
callable shares are subject to call by the Bank under certain 
circumstances. Canada's commitment for callable shares has a 
current value of $ 1 75,65 1 ,308. 

Asian Development Bank 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the Asian Development Bank, as authorized by the Interna- 
tional Development (Financial Institutions) Continuing Assist- 
ance Act, and various appropriation acts (including External 
Affairs Vote L55, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85). 

At year end, authority had been granted for the purchase of 
11,110 paid-in shares and 81,433 callable shares. Instalment 
payments for the paid-in shares may be made in cash or in 
non-interest bearing, non-negotiable demand notes. These 
notes are deducted from subscriptions to show the net position 
of the Government vis-a-vis the Bank. 

During the year, transactions included additional subscrip- 
tions in cash and in non-interest bearing demand notes, and a 
valuation adjustment. 

As at March 31, 1985, Canada's instalment payments 
amounted to $105,434,978 US for 8,740 paid-in shares and 
9,480,000 Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) for 948 paid-in 
shares. These balances were translated into Canadian dollars 
at year-end closing rates of exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn and 
1 SDR/1.35507 Cdn). The 81,433 callable shares are subject 
to call by the Bank under certain circumstances. Canada's 
commitment for callable shares has a current value of 
$439,147,591 US and 450,300,000 SDRs valued at 
$1,209,009,675 Cdn at year-end closing rates of exchange. 

Caribbean Development Bank 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the Caribbean Development Bank, as authorized by the 
International Development (Financial Institutions) Continuing 
Assistance Act, and various appropriation acts (including 
External Affairs Vote L55, Appropriation Act No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85). 

At year end, authority had been granted for the purchase of 
1,585 paid-in shares and 5,355 callable shares. Canada may 



issue, as payment for shares purchased, pending cash require- 
ments by the Bank, non-interest bearing, non-negotiable 
demand notes. These notes are deducted from subscriptions to 
show the net position of the Government vis-a-vis the Bank. 

During the year, a valuation adjustment transaction was 
made. 

As at March 31, 1985, Canada's instalment payments 
amounted to $9,560,310 US for 1,585 paid-in shares. This 
balance was translated into Canadian dollars at the year-end 
closing rate of exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn). The 5,355 
callable shares are subject to call by the Bank under certain 
circumstances. Canada's commitment for callable shares has a 
current value of $32,300,021 US, valued at $44,044,309 Cdn 
at the year-end closing rate of exchange. 

Inter-American Development Bank 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the Inter-American Development Bank, as authorized by 
the International Development (Financial Institutions) Con- 
tinuing Assistance Act, and various appropriation acts (includ- 
ing External Affairs Vote L55, Appropriation Acts No 1 and 
No 2, 1984-85). 

At year end, authority had been granted for the purchase of 
9,982 paid-in shares and 115,220 callable shares. Instalment 
payments for the paid-in shares may be made in cash or in 
non-interest bearing, non-negotiable demand notes. These 
notes are deducted from subscriptions to show the net position 
of the Government vis-a-vis the Bank. 

During the year, transactions included additional subscrip- 
tions in the form of non-interest bearing demand notes, and a 
valuation adjustment. 

As at March 31, 1985, Canada's instalment payments 
amounted to $105,903,066 US for 8,768 paid-in shares. This 
balance was translated into Canadian dollars at the year-end 
closing rate of exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn). The 115,220 
callable shares are subject to call by the Bank under certain 
circumstances. Canada's commitment for callable shares has a 
current value of $1,389,948,405 US, valued at $1,895,333,645 
Cdn at the year-end closing rate of exchange. 

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development 
(World Bank) 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Develop- 
ment, as authorized by the Bretton Woods Agreements Act, 
and various appropriation acts. During the year, transactions 
included the fourth and fifth instalments in payment for 3,344 
shares, and a valuation adjustment. 

Canada has subscribed for 21,782 shares of the Bank of 
which 10% has been paid by cash and notes. The remaining 
90% is represented by a guarantee subject to call by the Bank 
only when required, to meet obligations of the Bank for funds 
borrowed or loans guaranteed by it, and not for use by the 
Bank in its lending activities or for administrative expenses. 

As at March 31, 1985, the foreign currency balance was 
translated into Canadian dollars at the year-end closing rate of 
exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn). 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7-37 



I 



International Development Association 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the International Development Association, as authorized 
by the International Development Association Act, and vari- 
ous appropriation acts. The subscriptions to the Association, 
which is part of the World Bank Groups, are used to lend 
funds to developing countries for development purposes, at 
rates highly favourable to the borrower (no interest, with a 50 
year maturity and 10 years of grace). 

During the year, transactions included additional subscrip- 
tions in the form of non-interest bearing, non-negotiable 
demand notes. These notes are deducted from the subscrip- 
tions to show the net position of the Government vis-a-vis the 
Association. 

International Finance Corporation 

' This account records Canada's subscriptions to the capital 
of the International Finance Corporation, which is part of the 
World Bank Groups, as authorized by various appropriation 
acts. 



At year end, authority had been granted for the purchase of 
20,952 paid-in shares. 

During the year, a valuation adjustment transaction was 
made. 

As at March 31, 1985, Canada's total instalment payments 
amounted to $20,952,000 US for 20,952 paid-in shares. This 
balance was translated into Canadian dollars at the year-end 
closing rate of exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn). 

International flnancial institutions 

This account records loans for assistance to international 
financial institutions, as authorized by the International De- 
velopment (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act, the Interna- 
tional Development (Financial Institutions) Continuing Assist- 
ance Act, and various appropriation acts (including External 
Affairs Votes L50 and L55, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 
2, 1984-85). 

The balances and transactions for loans to various interna- 
tional financial institutions are as follows: 



African Development Bank 

African Development Fund 

Less: notes payable 

Andean Development Corporation 

Asian Development Bank — Special 

Asian Development Fund 

Less: notes payable 

Caribbean Development Bank — 

Agricultural Development Fund 

Caribbean Development Bank — 

Commonwealth Caribbean Regional 

Caribbean Development Bank — Special 

Less: notes payable 

Central American Bank for Economic Integration 

Inter-American Development Bank — Fund for Special Operations . 
Less: notes payable 

International Bank for Reconstruction and Development 

International Fund for Agriculture Development 

Less: notes payable 

International Monetary Fund 





Receipts 


Payments 






and other 


and other 




April 1/1984 


credits 


charges 


March 31/1985 


$ 


$ 


S 


S 


4,593,896 


125,000 




4,468,896 


248,507,428 




39,730,495 


288,237,923 


130,500,000 


33,168,000 


28,700,000 


134,968.000 


118.007.428 


33.168.000 


68.430.495 


153.269.923 


5,000,000 


124,990 




4,875.010 


27,027,000 






27,027,000 


367,668,383 




85,559.322 


453,227,705 


279.002,663 


85,559,322 


27,059,000 


337,502,985 


88.665.720 


85.559.322 


112.618.322 


115.724.720 


8.600,000 






8,600,000 


5,104,400 




350,000 


5,454,400 


36,025,575 




7,159,780 


43.185,355 


6,469,895 


6,070,655 




12,540,550 


29.555.680 


6.070.655 


7.159.780 


30.644.805 


2,384,279 


25,500 




2,358,779 


237,830,936 




28,724,787 


266,555,723 


71,849,359 


11,972,025 


10,350,966 


73,470,418 


165.981.577 


11.972.025 


39.075.753 


193.085.305 


25,522,000 




1,750,000 


27.272,000 


42,000,000 






42,000,000 


42,000,000 






42,000.000 


13,998,092 




959,825 


14,957,917 


494,440,072 


137,045,492 


230,344.175 


587,738.755 



International Tin Council 

This account records Canada's subscriptions to the Interna- 
tional Tin Council, as authorized by previous appropriation 
acts. The subscriptions are for the investment in the buffer 
stock previously established and carried forward under the 
Sixth International Tin Agreement. 

International Natural Rubber Agreement 

This account records Canada's contributions to the finan- 
cing of the natural rubber buffer stock, as authorized by a 
previous appropriation act. Pursuant to the International 
Natural Rubber Agreement, 1979, Canada is committed to 
participate in the funding of the rubber buffer stock up to 
$12,500,000. 



During the year, Canada received a refund of $744,229 as a 
result of an adjustment to contributions required from par- 
ticipating members. 

International organizations and associations 

These items represent the historical value of payments made 
by the Canadian Government to working capital funds main- 
tained by international organizations of which Canada is a 
member. Participation in the financing of these working capi- 
tal funds, on the basis of the scale of assessments, is prescribed 
by financial regulations for membership in the organizations. 
Payments into the funds are not subject to interest or repay- 
ment schedules, but are recorded by the organizations as 
credits from member states. Payments by Canada were 
authorized by appropriation acts. 



7-38 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



During the year, an additional advance to the working 
capital fund of the Paris Union of the World Intellectual 
Property Organization was authorized by External Affairs 
Vote L12b, Appropriation Act No 3, 1984-85. 

During the year, Canada made a payment of 14,451 Swiss 
Francs valued at $7,292 Cdn to the Paris Union of the World 
Intellectual Property Organization. In addition, Canada 
received a refund of $800 US valued at $1,056 Cdn from the 
International Atomic Energy Agency. 

This account also records payments and the balance out- 
standing on United Nations bonds purchased by the Canadian 
Government in September 1962. The bonds yield interest at 
the rate of 2% per annum, and are repayable over 25 years by 
annual instalments in amounts from 3.1% to 5.1% of the 
amount subscribed. During the year, Canada's investment of 
$923,520 US as at April 1, 1984, was reduced by a payment of 
$299,520 US valued at $401,057 Cdn. Payments and other 
charges amounting to $73,440 represent a valuation adjust- 
ment of Canada's foreign investment of $624,000 US trans- 
lated into Canadian dollars at the year-end closing rate of 
exchange ($1 US/$ 1.3636 Cdn). 

VETERANS' LAND ACT FUND 
ADVANCES 

Advances have been made, under Parts I and III of the 
Veterans' Land Act, for the acquisition of land, permanent 

TABLE 7.12 

VETERANS' LAND ACT FUND 



improvements, removal of encumbrances, purchase of stock 
and equipment, and protection of security and, under Part II 
of the Act, for the purchase, subdivision and development of 
land, and for progress payments to veterans during construc- 
tion and completion of unfinished houses, after termination of 
construction contracts, etc. On completion of the construction 
contract for each house, Canada Mortgage and Housing Cor- 
poration will place or arrange to have placed, a mortgage on 
the property and will reimburse the Fund the full cost of that 
property. The total amount authorized to be outstanding at 
any time is $605,000,000. 

A provision equal to Vio of the benefits to veterans was 
established each year up to and including 1978-79. Since that 
time, a forecast of requirements has been performed each year, 
and provisions are established as necessary. These provisions 
are charged to budgetary expenditure and credited to the 
allowance for conditional benefits account. The allowance for 
conditional benefits account represents the accumulated net 
provisions for benefits to veterans in the form of forgiveness of 
loans authorized by the Veterans' Land Act. These benefits 
come into effect only after certain conditions are fulfilled by 
the veterans. At the end of 10 years, the conditions having 
been met, the accumulated provision is charged to the allow- 
ance for conditional benefits account, and credited to the 
veteran's loan account. 

Table 7.12 summarizes the balances and transactions for 
advances to the Veterans' Land Act Fund. 





April 1/1984 


Receipts and 
other credits 


Payments and 
other charges 


March 31/1985 


Net increase or 
1985 


decrease ( - ) 
1984 


Veterans' Land Act Fund — 

Advances 

Less: allowance for conditional benefits 


S 

227,006,222 
3,093,466 


S 

44,831,382 
2,600,000 


$ 

11,145,766 
4,735,623 


S 

193,320,606 
957,843 


S 

-33,685,616 
-2,135,623 


S 

- 34,639,623 

- 3,373,779 


Total 


223,912,756 


47,431,382 


15,881,389 


192,362,763 


-31,549,993 


-31,265,844 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

JOINT AND MIXED ENTERPRISES 

Joint and mixed enterprises are entities with share capital 
owned jointly by the Government and other governments 
and/or organizations to further common objectives. This group 
records the Government's loans, investments and advances to 
such entities. 



7»39 



Table 7.13 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the various types of loans, investments and advances 
to joint and mixed enterprises. 



TABLE 7.13 

JOINT AND MIXED ENTERPRISES 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



Canada Development Corporation — 

Regional Industrial Expansion 

Canarctic Shipping Company Limited — Trans- 
port 

Cooperative Energy Corporation — Energy, 
Mines and Resources 

Lower Churchill Development Corporation — 
Energy, Mines and Resources 

Newfoundland and Labrador Development Cor- 
poration Limited — Regional Industrial 
Expansion — 

Capital stock 

Loans 

N.S. Holdco Limited — Fisheries and Oceans — 

Capital stock 

Advance 

125459 Canada Limited — Fisheries and Oceans 
Societe Inter-Port de Quebec — Regional Indus- 
trial Expansion 

Telesat Canada — Communications 

Total 



April 1/1984 


Receipts and 
other credits 


Paymenu and 
other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


S 


$ 


S 


S 


S 


S 


322,000,000 






322,000,000 






58,073,489 


269,489 




57,804,000 


- 269,489 


184,344 


14,750,000 






14,750,000 






200 
25,000,000 
25.000.200 






200 

25,000,000 
25,000.200 






10,000,000 
10.000,000 




17,500,000 

3,000,000 

20.500,000 

90,775,000 


27,500,000 

3,000,000 

30.500.000 

90,775,000 


17,500,000 

3,000.000 

20.500.000 

90.775.000 


10,000.000 
10.000.000 


400 
30,000,000 






400 
30,000,000 






459,824,089 


269,489 


111,275,000 


570,829,600 


111,005.511 


10,184,544 



Canada Development Corporation 

The Corporation was established by the Canada Develop- 
ment Corporation Act, to assist in the creation or development 
of businesses, resources, properties and industries in Canada. 
The Minister of Finance may subscribe to purchase and hold 
shares of the Corporation for the Government of Canada. 

The Government has purchased, pursuant to Section 35 of 
the Act, 30,71 1,990 no par value common shares. 

The Government's holding of shares represents 83.6% of the 
common shares outstanding, and 47.3% of the voting rights. 

On June 27, 1985, legislation respecting the reorganization 
of Canada Development Corporation (CDC) was first intro- 
duced in the House of Commons and as of September 16, 
1985, such legislation had not been passed. This legislation 
authorizes the sale of CDC's common shares held by the 
Government subject to its terms and conditions. Subsequent to 
the year end, 23,000,000 common shares, at a unit price of 
$1 1.50, were subscribed by the public. 

Canarctic Shipping Company Limited 

In 1977-78, 305,996 common shares of Canarctic Shipping 
Company Limited having a total value of $305,996, and 
representing 51% of the common shares outstanding, were 
purchased and charged to budgetary expenditure (Transport 
Vote 10 — Marine operating expenditures). 



Cooperative Energy Corporation 

The Corporation was established under the Cooperative 
Energy Act, to bring together a number of co-operative finan- 
cial, agricultural, service and marketing institutions to partici- 
pate in the Canadian oil and gas industry. The Corporation is 
a holding company whose shareholders are the participating 
co-operatives and the Government of Canada. 

The Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources may sub- 
scribe for, acquire and hold shares and equity debentures of 
the Corporation for the Government of Canada. For that 
purpose, the Government of Canada may provide, over the 
next three years, up to $100,000,000 to match investment 
funds contributed by participating co-operative organizations. 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion, as authorized by the Cooperative Energy Act, is recorded 
in this account and is made up of: 



March 31, 1985 

S 

Equity debentures 3,075.900 

57.804 class B shares 5.780,400 

489,477 class D shares .48,947,700 

57,804,000 



7*40 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



The equity debentures pay 6% interest per year, payable 
every December 31. As of March 31, 1985, the Government 
received 454,547 class C shares at $ 1 each in lieu of cash for 
the interest due on the equity debentures. These class C shares 
are not recorded in the accounts of Canada. 

Lower Churchill Development Corporation 

This account records the Government's investment in the 
capital of the Corporation. In respect of Canada's participa- 
tion with the Government of Newfoundland in the develop- 
ment of the hydro-electric power potential of the Lower 
Churchill River in Labrador, the Government is authorized to 
purchase approximately 49% of the shares of the Lower 
Churchill Development Corporation. 

The Government has purchased 1,475 class A shares, repre- 
senting 49% of the shares outstanding. The balance of the 
outstanding shares is owned by Newfoundland and Labrador 
Hydro. 

Newfoundland and Labrador Development Corporation 
Limited 

Capital stock 

The Government has purchased 200 ordinary $1 par value 
shares of Newfoundland and Labrador Development Corpora- 
tion Limited, in accordance with an agreement between 
Canada and Newfoundland pursuant to Section 8(3)(c) of the 
Special Areas Act. This represents 40% of the authorized 
shares. The balance of the outstanding shares is owned by the 
Government of Newfoundland. 

Loans 

Loans have been made to provide financing and other 
services to small and medium-sized businesses in Newfound- 
land. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 8.375% to 18.375% per 
annum, and are repayable at the end of 10 years, with final 
repayments between April 13, 1987 and March 31, 1992. 

N.S. Holdco Limited 

The Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act authorizes the 
investment and the provision of financial assistance for the 
restructure of fishery enterprises to help Atlantic fisheries 
become more viable, competitive and privately-owned. 

Capital stock 

During the year, the Government purchased 3,500 class 
AA-1 preferred shares and 14,000 senior class 1 preferred 
shares of N.S. Holdco Limited for $3,500,000 and 
$14,000,000, respectively. N.S. Holdco Limited is the Nova 
Scotia — based holding company for the federal equity invest- 
ment in National Sea Products of Halifax, Nova Scotia that 
was formed from restructuring National Sea Products Limited 



and HB Nickerson and Sons Limited. The Company issued 
3,500 common voting shares without nonimal or par value 
which are held in proportion to the class AA-1 preferred 
shares. 

As at March 31, 1985, the Government owns 31% of the 
issued common voting shares and 25% of the issued preferred 
non-voting shares of N.S. Holdco Limited. The balance of the 
shares is owned by the Bank of Nova Scotia. 

Advance 

During the year, the Government advanced $3,000,000 to 
N.S. Holdco Limited to permit the reimbursement to the Bank 
of Nova Scotia of costs associated with the restructure of 
National Sea Products Limited ans HB Nickerson and Sons 
Limited. In exchange for the amount advanced, the Govern- 
ment is to receive preferred shares of N.S. Holdco Limited. 

As at March 31, 1985, the amount advanced was still being 
held in trust by N.S. Holdco Limited pending final settlement 
of the refinancing agreement between National Sea Products 
Limited and HB Nickerson and Sons Limited. The Govern- 
ment will take possession of the preferred shares of N.S. 
Holdco Limited once this agreement is achieved. 

125459 Canada Limited 

The Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act authorizes the 
investment and the provision of financial assistance for the 
restructure of fishery enterprises to help Atlantic fisheries 
become more viable, competitive and privately-owned. 

During the year, the Government purchased 90,775 class 
AA preferred shares of 125459 Canada Limited for 
$90,775,000. 125459 Canada Limited is the Newfoundland- 
based holding company for the federal equity investment in 
Fishery Products International Limited that was formed from 
restructuring Fishery Products, The Lake Group, John Penney 
and Sons, and TJ Hardy Co. The Company issued 908 
common voting shares which are held in proportion to the class 
A A preferred shares. 

As at March 31, 1985, the Government owns 61.9% of the 
issued voting shares. The balance of the issued voting shares is 
owned by the Government of Newfoundland — 25.9% and the 
Bank of Nova Scotia— 12.2%. 

Societe Inter-Port de Quebec | 

The Government has purchased 400 fully paid capital shares 
of the Societe Inter-Port de Quebec at $1 per share, under the 
authority of the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion. 
This represents 40% of the authorized shares. The balance of 
the outstanding shares is owned by the Government of Quebec. 

Telesat Canada 

The Government has purchased 3,000,000 common shares 
of Telesat Canada for $10 per share, for $30,000,000. This 
investment represents 49.99% of the shares outstanding. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

MISCELLANEOUS 

This group records loans, investments and advances not 
classified elsewhere. 

Table 7.14 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the various types of miscellaneous loans, investments 
and advances. 

TABLE 7.14 

MISCELLANEOUS LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7-41 



Receipts and 
April 1/1984 other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Loans and accountable advances — 
External Affairs — 

Personnel posted abroad 

Posts abroad 

National Defence — 
Imprest accounts, standing advances and 
authorized loans 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Personnel posted in Canada 

Supply and Services — 

Miscellaneous departmental accountable 
advances 

Treasury Board — 

Miscellaneous departmental accountable 
imprest and standing advances 

Total loans and accountable advances 

Other miscellaneous — 
Agriculture — 
Construction of multi-purpose exhibition 
buildings 

Communications — 
Cultural property 

Employment and Immigration — 
Assisted passage scheme 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 
Hydro-Quebec Research Institute 

External Affairs — 
Development of export trade (loans admin- 
istered by the Export Development Cor- 
poration) 

Finance — 

Ottawa Civil Service Recreational Associa- 
tion 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Authority 

Town of Oromocto 

Town of Oromocto Development Corpora- 
tion 

Fisheries and Oceans — 
Canadian producers of frozen groundfish .... 

Groundfish processors 

Haddock fishermen 



6.962,726 

5.731,335 

12.694.061 


7,959.883 
363,934.727 
371.894.610 


9,049.833 
365.177.932 
374.227.765 


8,052.676 
6,974.540 
15.027.216 


1.089,950 
1.243,205 
2.333.155 


1,230.042 
-5,292,601 
- 4.062.559 


25.325.664 


150.991,259 


159.609,462 


33.943.867 


8,618,203 


J. 474.534 


1,563 






1.563 




- 62.798 


5,347,383 


5,471,375 


4.957.846 


4.833.854 


-513.529 


358.434 


11,608,528 


10,017.796 


11.248.463 


12.839.195 


1,230,667 


752,759 


54.977.199 


538,375,040 


550.043.536 


66.645.695 


11,668,496 


- 1.539,630 



23,172.416 


617.257 




22.555.159 


-617.257 


-512,196 


4,920 


1.000 




3,920 


-1.000 


4,920 


48,532,665 


13,178,508 


19,471.514 


54.825.671 


6.293.006 


3.130,143 


14.308.962 


1,031,519 




13.277.443 


-1.031,519 




87.506,678 


9,671,840 


166.396,258 


344.231.096 


156.724,418 


103.244.923 


329,329 

10,908,257 

19,649 


21.904 

151,783 
7,520 


930.990 


307.425 

11.687.464 

12.129 


-21.904 
779.207 
- 7.520 


- 264.736 
688.007 
-7.096 


411,016 
11,668.251 


62,744 
243.951 


930.990 


348.272 
12.355.290 


-62,744 
687.039 


- 59.540 
356.635 


678.244 

192.889 

1,430,176 

2.301.309 


19.365 

24.195 
43.560 




658.879 

192,889 

1. 405.98 1 

2.257.749 


- 19,365 

-24.195 
-43.560 


- 37.473 

-155.514 

- 5.343 

- 198.330 



7-42 
TABLE 7.14 

MISCELLANEOUS LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND AD\ ANCES— Concluded 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Receipts and 
April 1/1984 other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Indian Affairs and Northern Development — 

British Yukon Railway Company 

Canadian Arctic Producers Co-operative 
Limited — 

Capital stock 

~ Loans 

Chippewa Band of Kettlepoint 

Council for Yukon Indians 

Eskimo loan fund 

Indian economic development 

Indian housing assistance 

Indians and Inuit of Quebec 

Inuvialuit Development Corporation 

Native claimants 

Labour — 
Provincial workmen's compensation boards 

National Defence — 
Canadian Forces housing projects 

Public Works— 

Burgeo Leasing Limited 

Eurocan Pulp and Paper Co Ltd 

Oil refinery terminal wharf at Come-by- 

Chance, Newfoundland 

Sydney Steel Corporation 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 

Canadian defence industry 

Canadian manufacturers of automotive 
products 

Company stock option 

Consolidated Computer Incorporated 

Enterprise development program 

Footwear and tanning industries adjust- 
ment program 

Industrial and regional development pro- 
gram 

Kennedy Round agreement 

Pharmaceutical industry development 
assistance program 

Radio Engineering Products Limited 

Solicitor General — 

Parolees 

Supply and Services — 

Defence production loan account 

Transport — 

Coast Ferries Limited 

Corporation of the City of Montreal 

Hamilton Harbour Commissioners 

Lakehead Harbour Commission 

Port Alberni Harbour Commission 

Veterans Affairs — 
Commonwealth War Graves Commission .. 

Account without current transactions 

Total other miscellaneous 

Total 



5,000,000 



250,000 



4,750,000 



- 250,000 



236,000 


236,000 




141,725 


18.734 




377.725 


254.734 




65,000 






2,836,787 




969,969 


3,821,498 


1,108,391 


181,248 


44,704,340 


3,665,783 


5,466,499 


4,578,838 


827,708 


737,614 


3,500,000 


3,500,000 




9,675,000 


9,675,000 




64,427,596 


962,193 


14,128,840 


138.986.784 


20.243.809 


21.484.170 



4,267,000 



16,170,865 


672.369 


166,245 
1,575,000 


8.648 
225,000 


19,311,904 

5,218,162 

26.271.311 


233.648 


27,521.057 


4,975,680 


1,234,000 


1,234.000 


12,395,998 
20,296,131 


316.667 


127,113 


47,044 


975,000 
952,096 




6,000 

1,000.000 

64.507.395 


6,000 
6.579,391 



16,011 



1,724,007 



28,137 



248,000 



275,000 

275.000 
31.457 





- 236,000 




122,991 


- 18,734 


-18,873 


122.991 


- 254.734 


- 18.873 


65.000 






3.806.756 


969,969 


912.063 


2.894.355 


-927,143 


- 626,762 


46.505.056 


1.800,716 


532,534 


4.488.744 


- 90,094 

- 3,500,000 

- 9,675,000 


-457,397 


77,594.243 


13,166,647 


14,006,112 


140.227.145 


1.240,361 


14,347.677 


4,515,000 


248,000 


100,000 


15,498,496 


-672,369 


-511,336 


157,597 


- 8,648 


-7,900 


1,350.000 


- 225,000 


- 225,000 


19,311,904 




5,104,215 


5,218,162 






26.037.663 


- 233,648 


4,871.315 


22,545,377 


- 4,975,680 


-9,454,512 




- 1,234,000 


- 54,000 


12,395,998 






19,979,464 


-316,667 


4,224,572 


80,069 


-47,044 


- 587,387 


1,250,000 


275,000 


975,000 


952,096 




-7,714 




-6,000 


-33,000 


1,000,000 






58.203.004 


-6.304.391 


- 4.937.041 



19,331 



1.724,007 



3,320 



6,078 



100,000 

723,445 

1,357,769 

418,863 

1,093.077 

3.693,154 


81,107 
191,496 

64,202 
114,539 
451.344 




100,000 
642,338 

1,166,273 
354,661 
978.538 

3.241.810 


-81,107 
-191,496 

- 64,202 
-114,539 
-451.344 


- 78,649 
-1,707,424 

-59,681 

- 106.506 

- 1.952.260 


55.686 


4.812 




50,874 


-4,812 


780 
- 70.326 


543,187,414 


53,001,145 


208,837,389 


699,023,658 


155,836,244 


117,880.982 


598,164,613 


591,376,185 


758,880,925 


765,669,353 


167,504,740 


116.341,352 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7*43 



Personnel posted abroad 

A working capital advance account was established to 
finance loans and advances to employees posted abroad, 
including employees of other Government departments. The 
purposes of the account were extended to include loans and 
advances to locally-engaged staff abroad including their 
dependants, for medical expenses. 

During the year, the total amount authorized to be out- 
standing at any time was increased to $14,500,000 by External 
Affairs Vote LI 3c, Appropriation Act No 4, 1984-85. 

The closing balance consists of loans to employees, 
$6,595,835; advances for medical expenses, $551,070; and, 
security and other deposits under Foreign Service Directives, 
$905,771. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 10% to 18.375% per 
annum, and are repayable over 4 years, with final instalments 
between April 1, 1985 and June 30, 1989. 

Posts abroad 

Non-interest bearing advances have been made for interim 
financing of expenditures at posts abroad, pending distribution 
to appropriations of this and other departments. 

During the year, the total amount authorized to be oustand- 
ing at any time was increased to $30,000,000 by External 
Affairs Vote LI 4c, Appropriation Act No 4, 1984-85. 

Imprest accounts, standing advances and authorized 
loans 

This account was established for the purpose of financing: 
(a) public funds imprest and public funds advance accounts; 
{b) standing advances; (c) authorized loans and advances to 
employees posted abroad; and, {d) authorized recoverable 
advances to establish military messes and canteens. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $60,000,000. 

Personnel posted in Canada 

This account records imprest bank account advances made 
to regional offices. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $1,950,000. 

Miscellaneous departmental accountable advances 

The closing balance reflects amounts outstanding in the 
hands of departments. Government agencies and individuals, 
at year end, to be expended in the following year. 

Miscellaneous departmental accountable imprest and 
standing advances 

This account is operated to provide standing travel 
advances, petty cash and imprest bank account advances, to 
federal Government departments and agencies. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $17,000,000. 



Construction of multi-purpose exhibition buildings 

Loans have been made to finance the construction of multi- 
purpose exhibition buildings. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

id) repayable over 27 to 30 years, bearing interest at rates 
from 7.432% to 9.684% per annum, with final instal- 
ments between May 31, 2002 and May 1, 2008, 
$19,144,290; 

{b) repayable over 18 to 26 years, bearing interest at rates 
from 7.266% to 9.515% per annum, with final instal- 
ments between December 31, 1992 and February 15, 
2006, $2,545,294; and, 

(c) repayable over 10 to 15 years, bearing interest at rates 
from 7.613% to 8.766% per annum, with final instal- 
ments between May 1, 1988 and August 1, 1994, 
$865,575. 

Cultural property 

Loans may be made to institutions and public authorities in 
Canada, for the purchase of objects in respect of which export 
permits have been refused under the Cultural Property Export 
and Import Act, or for the purchase of cultural property 
situated outside Canada which is related to the national 
heritage. 

During the year, additional loans were authorized by Com- 
munications Vote L20, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85. The total loan authority is $10,000 per year. 

The loan bears interest at the rate of 10.875% per annum, 
and is repayable over 5 years, with the final instalment on 
September 30, 1988. 

Assisted passage scheme 

Section 121 of the Immigration Act authorizes the making 
of loans to immigrants and other such classes of persons. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $60,000,000. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) repayable by monthly instalments over 1 to 5 years, 
with a possible deferment of 2 years, bearing interest at 
rates from 6% to 15% per annum, with final instalments 
between April 1, 1985 and April 1, 1990, $8,978,957; 
and, 

{b) repayable by monthly instalments over 1 to 5 years, 
with a possible deferment of 2 years, non-interest bear- 
ing, with final instalments between April 1, 1985 and 
April 1, 1990, $45,846,714. 

Hydro-Quebec Research Institute 

Loans have been made to the Hydro-Quebec Research 
Institute, guaranteed by the Province of Quebec, to provide 
financial assistance for construction and operation of the 
Institute. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 7.187% to 7.937% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal annual instalments over 25 
years, with the final instalment on March 25, 1999. 



7-44 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Development of export trade 

Pursuant to Section 3 1 of the Export Development Act, the 
Governor in Council may authorize the Corporation to make 
loans where the liability is for a term, or in an amount in 
excess of that normally assumed by the Corporation. Such 
loans are financed directly by payments out of the Consolidat- 
ed Revenue Fund and are administered by the Corporation on 
behalf of the Government of Canada. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 8.25% to 9.5% per 
annum, and are repayable over 5 to 12 years, with final 
instalments between April 15, 1985 and April 15, 1995. 

During the year, receipts and other credits included loan 
repayments of $1 1,595,840, while payments and other charges 
included loans of $140,411,746, guarantees and insurance 
claim payments of $7,298,094 and a valuation adjustment of 
$18,686,417 in respect of loans totalling $247,090,790 US. 
Interest of $17.9 million was received and credited to Non-tax 
revenue — Return on investments. 

Ottawa Civil Service Recreational Association 

Loans have been made to the Ottawa Civil Service Recrea- 
tional Association, to assist in the building and development of 
the W Clifford Clark Memorial Centre. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 4.25% to 5.375% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal semi-annual instalments 
over 25 and 45 years, with final instalments between Septem- 
ber 30, 1990 and September 30, 2005. 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Authority 

Advances have been made to the Saint John Harbour 
Bridge Authority in connection with the financing, construc- 
tion and operation of a toll bridge across the harbour of Saint 
John, NB. The total amount of advances in each year is to be 
based on the difference for the year between the operating and 
financing costs of the toll bridge, and the revenue of the Bridge 
Authority, repayable when the revenue of the Bridge Author- 
ity for the year exceeds the amount of the operating and 
financing costs for such year. The advances bear interest at 
rates from 5% to 18.375% per annum. 

Advances made to the Authority to meet payments on 
Municipal Development and Loan Board loans and/or Canada 
Ports Corporation loans, have also been charged to this 
account. During the year, the total amount of loans authorized 
was increased to $12,085,000 by Finance Vote L20, Appro- 
priation Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

Town of Oromocto 

Loans have been made to the Town of Oromocto, New 
Brunswick, to provide capital assistance. 

The remaining loan bears interest at the rate of 5.875% per 
annum, and is repayable in equal semi-annual instalments over 
20 years, with the final instalment on June 1, 1986. 

Town of Oromocto Development Corporation 

Loans have been made to the Town of Oromocto Develop- 
ment Corporation, for housing projects in the Town of Oro- 
mocto, New Brunswick. The total loan authority is $1,250,000. 



The loans bear interest at rates of 5% and 5.75% per annum, 
and are repayable in equal semi-annual instalments over 30 
years, with final instalments between November 15, 1988 and 
February 15, 1992. 

Canadian producers of frozen groundflsh 

Loans have been made to Canadian producers of frozen 
groundfish, canned and frozen crabmeat, and canned and 
frozen lobster meat, to assist in the financing of inventories. 
The total loan authority is $5,500,000. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 13% per annum, and 
are repayable in equal annual instalments over 7 years, with 
the final instalment in December 1987. 



Groundfish processors 

Loans have been made to assist processors of groundfish in 
Canada, who, as determined by the Fisheries Prices Support 
Board, are unable to obtain sufficient financing on reasonable 
terms from other sources, to maintain raw fish prices, i.e. 
prices to primary producers, at the 1966-68 level. The total 
loan authority is $6,000,000. The loans bore interest at the 
rate of 8.75% per annum, and were repayable in equal annual 
instalments over 7 years, with the final instalment in Decem- 
ber 1984. 

Loans, in the amount of $3,000,000, have also been made to 
ice affected fish plants in Newfoundland, Labrador and North 
Shore, Quebec, to provide advances for working capital assist- 
ance to Canadian producers of groundfish products in New- 
foundland and Quebec, who were affected by severe ice condi- 
tions in May and June 1974. The loans bear interest at rates 
from 8% to 10% per annum, and are repayable in equal annual 
instalments over 7 years, with the final instalment in Decem- 
ber 1985. 



Haddock fishermen 

Loans have been made to Nova Scotia haddock fishermen 
whose fishery was closed from February 1 to May 31, 1975, 
pursuant to an agreement under the International Agreement 
for the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries. The total loan authority 
is $1,650,000. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 8% per annum, and are 
repayable in equal annual instalments over 4 years, with the 
final instalment in 1979. The Department of Justice is pro- 
ceeding with legal action to recover the loans. 



British Yukon Railway Company 

A loan has been made to the British Yukon Railway Com- 
pany, for the Whitepass and Yukon Railway, to maintain and 
imjprove the rail service of the Yukon Territory. 

The loan is non-interest bearing, and is repayable in equal 
annual instalments over 20 years, with the final instalment on 
December 31, 2003. Instalments in arrears bear interest at the 
rate established by the Minister of Finance for loans to Crown 
corporations in effect on the day the instalment is payable. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7-45 



Canadian Arctic Producers Co-operative Limited 

Capital stock 

The Government's investment in the capital of the Corpora- 
tion was recorded in this account. 

During the year, Indian Affairs and Northern Development 
Vote 21c, Appropriation Act No 4, 1984-85, authorized the 
write-off of $406,465 ($170,465 included in the Eskimo loan 
fund account) representing the value of shares of the Canadian 
Arctic Producers Co-operative Limited. These shares were 
transferred in 1982-83 to Canadian Arctic Producers Co-oper- 
ative Limited, pursuant to Section 52 of the Financial 
Administration Act. 



Loans 

In 1971-72, a loan of $250,000 was issued to Canadian 
Arctic Producers Co-operative Limited. The loan bears inter- 
est at the rate of 7% per annum, and is repayable in monthly 
instalments, with the final instalment on June 30, 1990. 

Chippewa Band of Kettlepoint 

A non-interest bearing loan has been made to the Chippewa 
Band of Kettlepoint, to purchase Lots 60 and 61 in Lake 
Road, West Concession, in the Township of Bosanquet, 
County of Lambton, Ontario. Repayment of this loan will be 
negotiated with the Band. 

Council for Yukon Indians 

Loans have been made to the Council for Yukon Indians, to 
provide interim benefits to elderly Yukon Indians pending 
settlement of Yukon Indians land claims. 

During the year, additional loans were authorized by Indian 
Affairs and Northern Development Vote L55, Appropriation 
Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

The loans are repayable in full upon settlement of land 
claims, and are non-interest bearing before an Agreement-in- 
Principle for the settlement of a claim is reached. 

Eskimo loan fund 

Loans have been made to individual Eskimos or groups of 
Eskimos, to promote commercial activities and gainful occupa- 
tions. Loans have also been made to co-operative associations, 
credit unions, caisses populaires or other credit societies incor- 
porated under provincial laws, where the majority of members 
are Eskimos, or to corporations incorporated under the laws of 
Canada, or provincial laws, where the controlling interest is 
held by Eskimos. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $7,072,000. 

Includfcd in the balance of loans outstanding as at April 1, 
1984 was an investment of $170,465 in Canadian Arctic 
Producers Co-operative Limited (see the Canadian Arctic 
Producers Co-operative Limited account). This investment was 
written-off by Indian Affairs and Northern Development Vote 
21c, Appropriation Act No 4, 1984-85. 



The loans bear interest at rates from 5% to 21% per annum, 
and are repayable over 1 to 15 years, with final instalments 
between April 1, 1985 and March 31, 1998. 

Indian economic development 

Loans have been made for the purposes of economic de- 
velopment of Indians, to Indians or Indian bands, or to 
individuals, partnerships or corporations, the activities of 
which contribute or may contribute to such development. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $70,000,000. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 5% to 21% per annum, 
and are repayable over 1 month to 15 years, with final 
instalments between April 1, 1985 and March 31, 1999. 

Indian housing assistance 

Second mortgage loans have been made to provide financial 
assistance to Indians and Inuit, for the construction and 
acquisition of houses and land, in areas other than Indian 
reserves. The purposes of the account were extended to author- 
ize loans and advances to Indians and Inuit, for repairs or 
improvements to houses at time of purchase, in areas other 
than Indian reserves. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $20,000,000. 

The loans are non-interest bearing, and are repayable in full 
by equal annual instalments or forgiveness, or, when the 
borrower sells the property. Whenever certain conditions of 
occupancy and maintenance are satisfied, instalments are for- 
given at the rate of 10% per annum for up to 10 years. 

During the year, repayments included forgiveness of 
$688,630, pursuant to Northern Affairs and National 
Resources Vote L51a, Appropriation Act No 9, 1966. 

Indians and Inuit of Quebec 

Loans were made to Indians and Inuit of Quebec, to meet 
legal and other related costs in their court action concerning 
the James Bay Hydro Project. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Inuvialuit Development Corporation 

Non-interest bearing loans were made in support of the 
Agreement-in-Principle for comprehensive land claims settle- 
ment. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Native claimants 

Loans have been made to native claimants, to defray the 
costs related to the research, development and negotiation of 
claims. 

During the year, additional loans were authorized by Indian 
Affairs and Northern Development Vote L50, Appropriation 
Acts No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 



7-46 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



The terms and conditions of the loans are as follows: 

(a) loans made before an Agreement-in-Principle for the 
settlement of a claim is reached are non-interest 
bearing; 

{b) loans made after the date on which an Agreement-in- 
Principle for the settlement of a claim has been 
reached, bear interest at a rate equal to the rate 
established by the Minister of Finance in respect of 
borrowings for equivalent terms by Crown corporations; 
and, 

(c) loans are due and payable, as to principal and interest, 
on the date on which the claim is settled, or on a date 
fixed in the agreement, which shall be not later than 
March 31, 1995, whichever date is earlier. 

Provincial workmen's compensation boards 

This account is operated under the authority of Section 3(4) 
of the Government Employees Compensation Act, to provide 
operating funds to enable provincial compensation boards to 
administer the Act on behalf of the Crown, and pay claims to 
Canadian Government employees injured in the course of their 
employment. 

The total amount of advances that is authorized to be made 
to all provincial workmen's compensation boards (except 
Quebec) is not to exceed three months' disbursements for 
compensation. The present limit for advances to the Province 
ofQuebec is $1,100,000. 

The advances are non-interest bearing and are to be repaid 
on termination of agreements with provincial boards. 

Canadian Forces housing projects 

Advances have been made to the Canada Mortgage and 
Housing Corporation, in respect of loans arranged by the 
Corporation for housing projects for occupancy by members of 
the Canadian Forces. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 4% to 5.75% per 
annum, and are repayable over 35 to 48 years, with final 
instalments between August 1, 1996 and November 1, 2010. 

Burgeo Leasing Limited 

Loans have been made to Burgeo Leasing Limited, for the 
construction of an extension to the wharf at Burgeo, New- 
foundland. The total loan authority is $240,000. 

The loans bear interest based on the composite rate of 
7.147% per annum, and are repayable in equal annual instal- 
ments over 25 years, with the final instalment on September 1 , 
1996. 

Eurocan Pulp and Paper Co Ltd 

Loans have been made to Eurocan Pulp and Paper Co Ltd, 
for the construction of a marine terminal at Kitimat, British 
Columbia. The total loan authority is $4,500,000. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 7.062% to 7.812% per 
annum, and are repayable in equal annual instalments over 20 
years, with the final instalment on March 31, 1991. 



Oil refinery terminal wharf at Come-by-Chance, 
Newfoundland 

Loans have been made for the construction of an oil refinery 
terminal wharf at Come-by-Chance, Newfoundland. The total 
loan authority is $28,200,520. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 1.803% per quarter, 
and are repayable in equal quarterly instalments over 1 5 years, 
with the final instalment on March 1, 1990. The instalments 
are in arrears since January 1, 1976. Parliamentary authority 
is required to write-off the balance. 

Sydney Steel Corporation 

Loans have been made to Sydney Steel Corporation, for the 
construction of wharf facilities at Sydney, Nova Scotia. The 
total loan authority is $6,000,000. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 9.078% per annum, 
and are repayable in equal annual instalments over 20 years, 
with the final instalment on June 12, 1998. The instalments 
are in arrears since June 1, 1979. Parliamentary authority is 
required to write-off the balance. 

Canadian defence industry 

Advances have been made to assist Canadian defence indus- 
try with plant modernization. Advances shall not exceed one- 
half of the cost of the acquisition of new equipment to defence 
industry. 

The advances are non-interest bearing, and are repayable 
over 1 to 10 years, with final instalments between April 1, 
1985 and June 1, 1986. 

Canadian manufacturers of automotive products 

Loans were made to assist manufacturers of automotive 
products in Canada, including material suppliers and tooling 
manufacturers, affected by the Canada-United States Agree- 
ment on Automotive Products, to adjust and expand their 
production, such loans to be made for the purpose of acquisi- 
tion, construction, installation, modernization, development, 
conversion and expansion of land, buildings, equipment, facili- 
ties or machinery, and for working capital. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Company stock option 

This account records the purchase by the General Adjust- 
ment Assistance Board and the Enterprise Development 
Board, on behalf of Her Majesty in right of Canada, of the 
capital stock of a company in order to exercise a stock option 
in such company that has been taken by the Board in connec- 
tion with the provision of a loan, or of insurance of a loan or a 
letter of credit made or issued to the company in accordance 
with the General Adjustment Assistance Regulations, the 
Automotive Manufacturing Assistance Regulations, or under 
the Enterprise Development Program, where, in the opinion of 
a Board established pursuant to Section 7 of the Department 
of Regional Industrial Expansion Act: 

(i) the value of the capital stock of the company has 
increased as a result of the assistance provided and the 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 

stock option should be exercised, in order to permit Her 
Majesty in right of Canada to benefit from the 
increased value of the capital stock of the company; or, 
(ii) the stock option should be exercised, to protect the 
Crown's interest in respect of the loan made or insur- 
ance provided; and, 

to authorize the sale or other disposition of any capital stock so 
acquired. 

During the year, additional purchases were authorized by 
Regional Industrial Expansion Vote L25, Appropriation Acts 
No 1 and No 2, 1984-85. 

Consolidated Computer Incorporated 

In 1981-82, the Government disposed of its interest in 
Consolidated Computer Incorporated. The sum of $100,000 
was received from Nabu Manufacturing Corporation in con- 
sideration of the transfer to it of debentures obtained by the 
Government as a result of paying off certain loans incurred by 
Consolidated Computer Incorporated. Now that the above 
transaction is completed, authority will be requested to delete 
the Government's investment in the Company from the 
accounts of Canada. 

Enterprise development program 

This account records loans to: 

(fl) a person engaged in a manufacturing or processing 
activity in Canada where, in the opinion of the Enter- 
prise Development Board, such loan is required for the 
purpose of: 

(i) restructuring operations in order to adapt efficient- 
ly to competition from goods imported at such 
prices, in such quantities or under such conditions 
as to cause or threaten serious injury; or, ^ • 

(ii) adjusting to changes in conditions affecting access 
to foreign markets which are attributable to the 
imposition by a country other than Canada of an 
import surtax or to the taking by such country of 
other actions having the same effect; 

(b) a person in respect of whom the Board has authorized 
the provision of insurance of a loan not exceeding 
$200,000 where, in the opinion of the Board, such loan 
is required for the purpose of preventing a serious delay 
in implementing a restructuring program; 

(c) a person who has previously obtained assistance in 
accordance with the Automotive Manufacturing Assist- 
ance Regulations, the Pharmaceutical Industry Incen- 
tives Development Assistance Regulations or the Foot- 
wear and Tanning Industries Assistance Regulations or 
under the Enterprise Development Program or to any 
trustee or receiver authorized by law to carry on the 
business of such person or manufacturer where, in the 
opinion of the Board, such loan is required for the 
purpose of protecting the Crown's interest in the assets 
securing a loan previously made or a loan or letter of 
credit previously insured, where such a person is unable 
to obtain sufficient financing on reasonable terms from 
other sources for such purposes; 

{d) a person in Canada engaged or about to engage in the 
tanning or in the manufacture of footwear who, in the 
opinion of the Board, requires assistance to establish or 



7*47 

restructure his operations in order to meet international 
competition; 

{e) a person engaged or about to engage in a manufactur- 
ing, processing or other commercial activity, for the 
purpose of promoting the establishment, growth, effi- 
ciency or international competitiveness of Canadian 
industry, and to foster the expansion of Canadian trade; 
and, 

(/) a person who has previously obtained assistance under a 
program of assistance to industry, or any trustee or 
receiver authorized by law to carry on the business of 
such person for the purpose of protecting the Crown's 
interest resulting therefrom. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 8.375% to 9.333% per 
annum, and are repayable over 5 to 20 years, with final 
instalments between April 15, 1985 and December I, 1998. 

Footwear and tanning industries adjustment program 

Loans have been made under the footwear and tanning 
industries adjustment program, to assist persons in Canada 
engaged or about to engage in the tanning or in the manufac- 
ture of footwear, who have been determined by the General 
Adjustment Assistance Board to be eligible for assistance to 
establish or restructure their operations, in order to meet 
international competition. 

The loans bear interest at rates from 8.7% to 10% per 
annum, and are repayable over 5 to 9 years, with final 
instalments between April 1, 1985 and December 1, 1989. 

This loan program has been superceded by the Enterprise 
Development Program, and no further loans will be made. 

Industrial and regional development program 

Loans have been made to firms and industries to help them 
adjust to changing competitive conditions and to produce new, 
more viable and competitive products and services. 

During the year, loans were authorized by Regional Indus- 
trial Expansion Vote L30, Appropriation Acts No 1 and No 2, 
1984-85. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 12.625% per annum, 
and are repayable between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 
1998. 

Kennedy Round agreement 

Loans have been made under the Adjustment Assistance 
Program related to the Kennedy Round agreement, to assist 
manufacturers in Canada who have been determined by a 
board established pursuant to Section 7 of the Department of 
Regional Industrial Expansion Act: {a) to be seriously injured 
or threatened with serious injury by reason of increased 
imports attributable to Kennedy Round tariff reductions made 
by Canada, resulting in exceptional problems of adjustment; 
{b) to be unable to obtain sufficient financing on reasonable 
terms from other sources, for purposes of making the neces- 
sary adjustment; (c) to require such loans in order to adapt 
efficiently to competition from goods imported at such prices, 
in such quantities or under such conditions as to cause or 
threaten serious injury; and, (</) to be unable to obtain suffi- 
cient financing on reasonable terms from other sources for 



7'48 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



such purposes. The category of persons eligible for loans also 
includes a manufacturer or other person in Canada: 

{a) in respect of whom the General Adjustment Assistance 
Board has authorized the provision of insurance pursu- 
ant to Industry, Trade and Commerce Vote 30c, 
Appropriation Act No 1, 1968, of a loan therein 
described for an amount not exceeding $200,000; and, 

(b) who, in the opinion of the Board, requires such loan to 
prevent serious delay in implementing the restructuring 
program approved by the Board. 

The loans bear interest only if the borrower realizes a profit, 
and are repayable over 17 years, with the final instalment on 
March 1, 1990. Parliamentary authority is required to write- 
off the balance. 

This loan program has been superceded by the Enterprise 
Development Program and consequently no further loans will 
be made. 

Pharmaceutical industry development assistance pro- 
gram 

Loans were made, under the pharmaceutical industry de- 
velopment assistance program, to companies in Canada, for 
the purpose of improving their ability to manufacture and 
market lower-priced prescription drugs at competitive prices, 
through reorganization of any of their operation of manufac- 
turing, distribution and research, and who were unable to 
obtain sufficient financing on reasonable terms from other 
sources for such purposes. 

During the year, the loans were repaid in full. 

Radio Engineering Products Limited 

Loans have been made to Radio Engineering Products Lim- 
ited, to provide working capital in order that it might remain 
viable and complete certain production. 

Radio Engineering Products Limited was indebted to Reve- 
nue Canada for tax arrears of some $3,500,000, and to the 
Department of Regional Industrial Expansion for approxi- 
mately $400,000 under the Defence Industry Productivity 
Program. At the time of the loans, the Government had 
acquired control of the Company. In November of 1975, the 
Company declared bankruptcy and the assets were subse- 
quently disposed of. 

These loans are in default since 1974-75. Parliamentary 
authority is required to write-off the balance. 

Parolees 

Loans have been made to parolees and individuals under 
mandatory supervision, to assist in their rehabilitation. 

The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $50,000. 

The loans are non-interest bearing and are repayable before 
the expiration of the parole period, or within one year from the 
date the loans were made, whichever period is the shorter. The 
repayment of a loan or any part thereof may be forgiven by 
the Solicitor General, if certain conditions are met. 



During the year, loans totalling $10,484 were forgiven pur- 
suant to Solicitor General Vote LI 03b, Appropriation Act No 
1, 1969. These loans were initially recorded in 1981-82, 
1982-83, 1983-84 and 1984-85. 

Defence production loan account 

This account was established under Section 15.1 of the 
Defence Production Act, to record loans or advances for any 
purpose other than to assist in the construction, acquisition, 
extension or improvement of capital equipment or works by 
any person. 

Section 15.2 of the Defence Production Act stated that the 
aggregate of expenditures charged to the Defence production 
revolving fund (budgetary account), and to this account, shall 
not at any time exceed by more than $100,000,000 the aggre- 
gate of amounts: 

(a) received from the sale or disposition of materials, sub- 
stances or defence supplies; 

(b) charged to another appropriation in respect of costs of 
acquisition, storage, maintenance or transportation of 
stocks of materials or substances purchased, or of 
stocks of defence supplies acquired, where such ma- 
terials, substances or defence supplies may be acquired 
under that appropriation; 

(c) charged to an appropriation or paid by an agent of Her 
Majesty or by an associated government, to pay costs 
incurred in respect of defence supplies, payment for 
which was made out and charged to the Defence pro- 
duction revolving fund; and, 

(d) received in repayment of a loan or advance previously 
charged to this account. 

A repayment of $ 1 .7 million owed to this account by CAE 
Aircraft is in dispute concerning the date when repayment is 
due. Legal counsel is of the opinion that no loss to the 
Government will be incurred. 

Coast Ferries Limited 

A loan was made to the Corporation, for working capital 
purposes. 

The loan bears interest at an annual rate equal to the rate 
established by the Minister of Finance in respect of Crown 
corporations' borrowings. The loan was due April 1, 1978. No 
interest and no repayment have been received since the loan 
was made. 

Corporation of the City of Montreal 

A loan has been made to the Corporation of the City of 
Montreal, for the construction of a vehicular tunnel under the 
Lachine Canal at Atwater Avenue. 

The loan bears interest at the rate of 3.125% per annum, 
and is repayable in equal annual instalments over 30 years, 
with the final instalment on June 20, 1991. 

Hamilton Harbour Commissioners 

Loans have been made to the Hamilton Harbour Commis- 
sioners, to assist in the development of the harbour. 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND ADVANCES 



7'49 



The total amount authorized to be outstanding at any time 
is $4,000,000. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) bearing interest at the rate of 6.062% per annum, 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 20 years, 
with the final instalment on June 30, 1987, $198,905; 

{b) bearing interest at the rate of 5.562% per annum, 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 20 years, 
with the final instalment on June 30, 1987, $192,368; 
and, 

(c) bearing interest at the rate of 4.125% per annum, 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 39 years, 
with the final instalment on January 31, 2001, 
$775,000. 

Lakehead Harbour Commission 

Loans have been made to the Lakehead Harbour Commis- 
sion, for the expansion of the Keefer terminal. 

The loans bear interest at the rate of 7.437% per annum, 
and are repayable in semi-annual instalments over 15 years, 
with the final instalment on June 30, 1989. 

Port Alberni Harbour Commission 

Loans have been made to the Port Alberni Harbour Com- 
mission, to finance the construction of a new lumber assembly 
wharf. 

The terms and conditions of the loans, with their year-end 
balances, are as follows: 

(a) bearing interest at the rate of 8.062% per annum, 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 20 years, 
with the final instalment on June 30, 1991, $252,911; 
and, 

(6) bearing interest at the rate of 7.187% per annum, 
repayable in semi-annual instalments over 20 years, 
with the final instalment on June 30, 1991, $725,627. 



Commonwealth War Graves Commission 

Advances have been made to the working capital fund of the 
Commonwealth War Graves Commission, to maintain graves 
and cemeteries. 

At year end, the balance of the advances was £30,000 UK. 
This balance was converted to $50,874 Cdn, using the year- 
end rate of exchange (£l UK = $1.6958 Cdn). 

The advances are non-interest bearing and have no fixed 
terms of repayments. 



ALLOWANCE FOR VALUATION 

In accordance with the comprehensive policy on valuation, 
assets are subject to an annual valuation to reflect reductions 
from the recorded value to the estimated realizable value. 

The allowance for valuation for loans, investments and 
advances, represents the estimated losses on the realization of 
the loans, investments and advances included in the accounts 
of Canada at year end. 



7-50 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 



Recorded Uncollected Interest 

In accordance with the Government's stated accounting 
policies, interest due but not received is not reported as 
revenue. In certain cases, this uncollected interest is recorded 
by being added to the applicable loan and advance account, 
and credited to an uncollected interest account. Since the 
Government's policy is to report revenue only as received, the in respect of the recorded uncollected interest. 



balance of the uncollected interest account is deducted from 
the loan and advance account, to present it on a net basis. 



Table 7.15 reports the balances and transactions for the year 



TABLE 7.15 

RECORDED UNCOLLECTED INTEREST 



April 1/1984 



Additions 



Collections 
and deletions 



March 31/1985 



Loans, investments and advances — 
Crown corporations — 

All other Crown corporations — 
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited — 

Housing 

Bruce heavy water plant 

Commercial products division 

Isotope production building 

Isotope production equipment 

Leprcau nuclear station 

Sheridan Park engineering design office 

Canada Development Investment Corporation — 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited 

Northern Canada Power Commission — Loans 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The — Interest bearing loans 
Provincial and territorial governments — 

Federal-provincial employment loans program 

Special development loans program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Atlantic Development Board carry-over projects 

Special areas and highways agreement 

Regional electrical interconnections 

Agricultural service centres — Loans 

Atlantic Provinces Power Development Act 

Yukon Territory small business loans 

National governments including developing countries — 

Jamaica — Economic assistance 

The United Kingdom Financial Agreement Act, 1946 

International organizations — 
International financial institutions — 

Inter-American Development Bank 

Miscellaneous — 

Hydro-Quebec Research Institute 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Authority 



6,199 




503 


5.696 


42,801,412 




3,587,356 


39,214.056 


173,835 




19,166 


154.669 




3.541,692 


3,541,692 






505,789 


505,789 




50,600,000 




537,684 


50.062.316 


14,098 




5.216 


8.882 


93.595.544 


4.047.481 


8,197.406 


89.445.619 


10.093,433 






10,093,433 


13,494,575 




3.466,566 


10,028,009 


210,000,000 






210,000,000 


90,302 




6.103 


84,199 


3.651 




309 


3,342 


2,773.249 




90.637 


2,682,612 


145.331 




3.287 


142,044 


34,233,643 




1,207,311 


33,026,332 


14,454,483 




153,180 


14,301,303 


506,743 


4,812 


4.219 


507.336 


12,884,669 




336.957 


12,547,712 


176,204 


39.386 




215,590 




1.375.000 




1,375,000 


115,802,213 






115,802.213 


5,442,861 


497,610 




5,940,471 


2,543,464 




184.794 


2,358.670 


558,405 


151,783 




710.188 


516,798,770 


6,116,072 


13.650.769 


509.264.073 



SECTION 



8 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Specified Purpose Accounts 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Canada Pension Plan Account 8.2 

Superannuation accounts 8.4 

Unemployment Insurance Account 8.8 

Government Annuities Account 8.8 

Deposit and trust accounts 8.8 

Provincial tax collection agreements account 8.22 

Other specifled purpose accounts 8.22 

Supplementary statements — 

Canada Pension Plan Account and the Canada Pension Plan 

Investment Fund 8.25 

Canada Employment and Immigration Commission relating 

to the Unemployment Insurance Account 8.28 

Government Annuities Account 8.31 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Dependants) Pension Fund 8.34 



8-2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

Specified purpose accounts represent the recorded value of 
the financial obligations of the Government of Canada in its 
role as administrator of certain public moneys received or 
collected for specified purposes, under or pursuant to legisla- 
tion, trusts, treaties, undertakings or contracts. These public 
moneys may be paid out only for the purposes specified in or 
pursuant to the legislation, trusts, treaties, undertakings or 
contracts. 

Because of the dedicated purposes of these moneys, specific 
accounts are required to be maintained to provide an account- 
ing mechanism to ensure that the moneys are used only for the 
purposes for which they were received or collected. Legislation 
relating to some accounts permits investments to be made and, 
in certain cases, the balances of the accounts earn interest. 

This section gives details of specified purpose accounts on 
which summary information was given in Sections 1 and 2 of 
this volume. 



Some tables in this section present the continuity of 
accounts, by showing the opening and closing balances, as well 
as receipts and other credits, and payments and other charges, 
i.e. inflow and outflow of transactions. In addition, the term 
"accounts without current transactions" has been included in 
one table, to provide a link with figures published in the 
previous year's edition of the Public Accounts, and to show net 
transactions in accounts which were closed out in the previous 
year. 

The financial statements of the Canada Pension Plan 
Account and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund, the 
Unemployment Insurance Account, the Government Annuities 
Account and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Depend- 
ants) Pension Fund, together with the Auditor General's 
reports thereon, are presented at the end of this section. 



TABLE 8.1 

SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



April 1/1984 



Canada Pension Plan Account, Table 8.2 26,61 1,970,832 

Less: provincial government securities held by the 

Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund, Table 8.2... 25,1 16,032,000 

1.495.938,832 

Superannuation accounts, Table 8.4 33,791,320,263 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiencies. 

Table 8.4 1,103,594,224 

32.687.726,039 

Unemployment Insurance Account, Table 8.1 1 - 278,347,613 

Less: interest bearing loans 3,823,000,000 

-4,101,347,613 

Government Annuities Account 1,123,604,018 

Canadian Ownership Account*'' 

Deposit and trust accounts. Table 8.12 2,290,316,719 

Provincial tax collection agreements account 1,308,339,595 

Other specified purpose accounts. Table 8.13 498,542,123 

Total 35,303,119,713 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



6,767,803,300 4,323,322,453 29,056,451,679 



$ $ 

2,444,480,847 2,503,868,511 



6.767.803.300 
4,857,490,734 

576,952,981 

5.434.443.715 

14,606,938,807 

3,048,000,000 

17.654.938.807 

75,862,736 

14,689,982,952 

12,904,534,267 

132,461,332 



2,233,064,000 
6.556,386,453 
1.131,951.255 



1,131.951,255 
14,590,252,614 

4,040,000,000 

18.630,252,614 

104,037,116 

14,369,712,915 

12,596,143,445 

57,257,996 



27,349,096,000 

1,707,355,679 

37,516,859,742 

526,641,243 

36,990,218.499 

-261,661,420 

4,815,000.000 

-5.076,661,420 

1,095,429,638 

2,610,586,756 

1,616,730.417 

573,745,459 



2,233,064,000 

211,416,847 

3,725,539,479 

-576,952,981 

4,302.492,460 

16,686,193 

992,000,000 
- 975,313,807 

-28,174,380 

320,270,037 

308,390,822 

75,203,336 



2,351,922,000 

151,946,511 

3,119,212,720 

-742,658,581 

3.861.871,301 

-26,382,108 

433,000,000 

-459,382,108 

-26,582,184 

532.166.341 

277,116,787 

62,084,699 



57,660,027,109 53,445,741,794 39,517,405,028 4,214,285.315 4,399,221,347 



Amounts received from the Canadian Ownership special charge levied to increase public ownership of the oil and gas industry in Canada are now reported as tax 
revenue on the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure (Section 2 of this volume). These amounts were previously credited to this account. The investments, 
previously charged to this account, are now reported under Loans, investments and advances— Petro-Canada (Section 7 of this volume). The closing balance of the 
account as of March 31, 1983 was adjusted to the Accumulated Deficit account. 



Canada Pension Plan Account 

The Canada Pension Plan is a compulsory contributory 
social insurance plan which enables members of the labour 
force to acquire and retain protection for themselves and their 
families against loss of income due to retirement, disability or 
death. Established in 1965, the Plan applies in all parts of 
Canada, except the Province of Quebec which has a compa- 
rable plan. 

Under existing arrangements, all benefits and costs incurred 
in the administration of the program are financed from contri- 



butions made by employees, employers and self-employed per- 
sons, and the interest earned from the investment of funds. 

The Government's financial obligation, as administrator of 
the Canada Pension Plan, is limited to the balance in the 
Account. 

Table 8.2 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions in the Canada Pension Plan Account less investment in 
securities of the provinces held by the Canada Pension Plan 
Investment Fund. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 
TABLE 8.2 

CANADA PENSION PLAN ACCOUNT 



8'3 



April 1/1984 
S 

Canada Pension Plan Account 26,61 1.970,832 

Less: provincial government securities held by the 
Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund — 

Newfoundland 523,032,000 

Nova Scotia 992,529,000 

Prince Edward Island 109,164,000 

New Brunswick 752,055,000 

Quebec 104,474,000 

Ontario 13.500,528.000 

Manitoba 1,439,398.000 

Saskatchewan 1,135,827,000 

Alberta 2,747,752,000 

British Columbia 3,81 1,273,000 

25.116,032.000 

Total 1,495,938,832 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



6.767,803,300 4,323,322,453 29,056,451,679 2,444,480.847 2.503.868,511 



47,146,000 

85.762,000 

10.500.000 

67.087.000 

5.400,000 

1.133.182.000 

119,316.000 

104,274.000 

305,422.000 

354.975,000 

2.233.064.000 



570,178,000 

1,078,291,000 

119,664.000 

819.142.000 

109.874.000 

14.633.710.000 

1.558,714.000 

1.240.101,000 

3.053,174,000 

4,166,248,000 

27.349.096.000 



47,146,000 

85,762,000 

10,500,000 

67,087,000 

5,400,000 

1,133,182.000 

119,316,000 

104,274,000 

305,422,000 

354,975,000 

2.233.064.000 



50.738,000 

90,597,000 

11,135.000 

71,205,000 

5,332.000 

1.200.847.000 

126,405,000 

109,328,000 

311.539,000 

374.796.000 

2.351.922.000 



6,767.803.300 6.556,386,453 1,707,355,679 



211,416,847 



151.946,511 



Receipts and other credits include: 

(a) contributions of: (i) L8% of earnings by employees 
earning over $2,000 for the 1984 calendar year and 
$2,300 for the 1985 calendar year, with matching 
contributions by employers, subject to maximum pay- 
ments of $338.40 for the 1984 calendar year and 
$379.80 for the 1985 calendar year and (ii) 3.6% of 
earnings of self-employed persons over $2,000 for the 
1984 calendar year and $2,300 for the 1985 calendar 
year, subject to maximum payments of $676.80 for the 
1984 calendar year and $759.60 for the 1985 calendar 
year; and, 

(b) interest received from securities of the Canada Pension 
Plan Investment Fund, and from the average daily 
operating balance. 



ment in the province, bears to total contributions. Contribu- 
tions received in respect of employment in the Yukon Territo- 
ry, the Northwest Territories and from certain other 
employees outside Canada, are invested in the special non- 
marketable bonds of the Government of Canada. 

Certain federal employees, such as members of the Canadi- 
an Armed Forces, who are resident in the Province of Quebec, 
contribute to the Canada Pension Plan. The securities of 
Quebec which are purchased by the Plan relate to the contri- 
butions of these employees. 

On the Statement of Assets and Liabilities of the Govern- 
ment of Canada, the investment in securities issued by prov- 
inces, as charged to the Canada Pension Plan Investment 
Fund, is deducted from the Canada Pension Plan Account. 



Payments and other charges include: 

(a) benefits paid under the Canada Pension Plan as retire- 
ment pensions, survivors' benefits paid to widows, wid- 
owers and orphans, or as lump sum death benefits, and 
disability pensions and benefits to children of disabled 
contributors; 

(b) benefits paid and recovered from the Canada Pension 
Plan, in accordance with an agreement with a province 
providing a comprehensive pension plan; 

(c) payments that are required to be charged to the 
Canada Pension Plan Account, in accordance with 
reciprocal agreements with other countries; and, 

(d) the costs of administration of the Plan. 

When the operating balance exceeds the estimated amount 
required to meet all payments in the following three-month 
period, the excess is available for the purchase of securities of 
the provinces and Canada. 

Provinces are advised monthly of the amount of excess 
moneys in the Canada Pension Plan Account that is available 
for the purchase of provincial securities. The amount available 
to each province is the proportion that contributions made to 
the Plan during the preceding ten years in respect of employ- 



TABLE 8.3 

CANADA PENSION PLAN ACCOUNT 

(in millions of dollars) 



RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions — 

Employees, employers and self-employed 

Interest on investments 

Interest on monthly operating balance 

PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Benefits 

Expenses 

Excess of receipts and other credits over pay- 
ments and other charges 

Funds applied — 
Purchases of bonds — 

Provincial 

Federal 

Increase in deposits with Receiver General .. 

Net increase 

Balance at beginning of year 

Balance at end of year 



1984-85 



1983-84 



3,879 

2,737 
152 


3,716 

2,423 

111 


6,768 


6,250 


4.224 
100 


3,657 
89 


4.324 


3,746 


2.444 


2,504 


2,233 

17 

194 


2,352 

17 

135 


2,444 
26,612 


2,504 
24,108 



29,056 



26,612 



8*4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Superannuation Accounts 

The Government provides pensions to retired employees or 
their dependants through pension schemes authorized by the 
Public Service Superannuation Act, the Canadian Forces 
Superannuation Act and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 
Superannuation Act. These pensions are indexed to the cost of 
living under authority of the Supplementary Retirement Ben- 
efits Act. The Government's liabilities in its role as administra- 
tor of these pension plans in respect of its employees and 
certain other contributors, are recorded in the relevant super- 
annuation accounts. 

Legislation for basic pensions provides for employee contri- 
butions (6'/2% of salary), employer contributions (prior year's 
employee contributions for members of the Public Service, and 
approximately 1.8 and 2.0 times current year's employee 
contributions for members of the Canadian Forces and the 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police respectively), allocation of 
interest (average market yield of 20 year Canada bonds 
weighted by the quarterly excess of receipts over disburse- 
ments in the three accounts each quarter over 20 years), and 
actuarial valuation deficiencies (full valuation at least once 
every 5 years with annual adjustments for authorized salary 
increases). Legislation for indexing basic pensions does not 
require actuarial valuations but does provide for additional 
employee contributions (1% of salary), matching employer 
contributions and allocation of interest (current rate of 5 year 
Canada bonds). 

Receipts and other credits for the superannuation accounts 
consist of contributions from personnel, related contributions 
from the Government and participating Public Service corpo- 
rations, transfers from other pension funds, other Government 
contributions related to actuarial liability adjustments (not 
applicable to the Supplementary Retirement Benefits 
Account), and interest. Payments and other charges for the 
superannuation accounts consist of payments of pensions, 
death benefits, refunds of contributions and transfers to other 
plans. 

Actuarial valuations are currently made at least once every 
five years (quinquennially), the next valuations will be made 
as at December 31, 1980 for the Public Service Superannua- 
tion Account, December 31, 1980 for the Canadian Forces 
Superannuation Account, and December 31, 1979 for the 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Account. In 
accordance with the legislation governing the three superannu- 



ation plans, the Minister of Finance has the authority to direct 
that any actuarial deficiency found will be credited to the 
appropriate account, charged to unamortized portion of 
actuarial deficiencies, and amortized to expenditure in five 
equal annual instalments commencing in the year in which the 
actuarial report is laid before Parliament. In addition, the cost 
of added liabilities, created by the authorization of salary 
increases each year, is credited to the superannuation 
accounts, charged to unamortized pwrtion of actuarial defici- 
encies, and amortized to expenditure over a period of five 
years commencing in the year in which the increases are 
authorized. 

Since the quarter ending September 30, 1969, the regula- 
tions, made pursuant to each of the superannuation acts, have 
provided for the calculation of interest at a rate related to the 
Canada Pension Plan interest rate. The acts further provide 
that the amount by which the calculated interest rate (current- 
ly about 11% per annum) exceeds the amount of interest 
calculated at the rate used in the latest actuarial report 
(currently 6.5% per annum for the Public Service, Canadian 
Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation 
Accounts), may be used to reduce the amortization of actuari- 
al deficiency adjustments charged to budgetary expenditure. 
Any of these interest earnings not needed to reduce amortiza- 
tion charges are credited to the respective Accounts. 

Table 8.4 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the superannuation accounts including the unamor- 
tized portion of actuarial deficiencies. Table 8.5 presents an 
analysis of actuarial deficiency adjustments. 

Table 8.6 presents a summary of transactions in superannu- 
ation accounts that resulted in charges to budgetary expendi- 
ture. In 1984-85, $5,162 million was charged to budgetary 
expenditure on account of superannuation plans. This is com- 
posed of Government contributions, $752 million; increased 
superannuation benefits paid during the year due to indexation 
in excess of the superannuates' share of contributions to the 
Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account, $676 million; 
and, interest, $3,734 million ($3,157 million credited to the 
superannuation accounts and $577 million of interest earnings 
in excess of 6.5% on the main superannuation accounts which 
was used to reduce the amortization of actuarial deficiency 
adjustments). 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

TABLE 8.4 

SUPERANNUATION ACCOUNTS 



••5 



April 1/1984 
$ 

Public Service Superannuation Account 17,980,598,737 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 652,740, 1 1 5 

17,327,858.622 

Canadian Forces Superannuation Account 12,268,197,318 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 419,664,949 

11,848,532,369 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation 

Account 1.595,055,911 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiency 31,189,160 

1,563.866.751 

Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account 1,947,468,297 

Total superannuation accounts 33,791,320,263 

Less: unamortized portion of actuarial deficiencies 1,103,594,224 

32,687,726,039 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



2,634,225,659 

355,586.315 

2.989.811.974 

1,459,187,261 

202,449,306 

1.661,636.567 

258.362.759 

18,917,360 

277,280.119 

505,715,055 

4,857,490,734 
576,952,981 



695,185,494 

695.185.494 
375,662,897 

375,662,897 



19,919,638,902 

297,153,800 

19,622.485.102 

13,351,721,682 

217,215,643 

13,134.506.039 



25,344.769 1,828,073.901 

12,271,800 

25.344.769 1.815.802.101 



35,758,095 
1,131,951,255 



2,417,425,257 

37,516,859,742 
526,641,243 



1,939,040.165 1,612,640,953 
-355.586.315 -481.706.314 
2.294.626.480 2.094.347.267 



1,083.524,364 
- 202,449,306 
1.285.973,670 

233,017.990 
- 18.917.360 
251.935.350 

469,956.960 

3,725.539,479 
-576.952.981 



921.891.477 
-239.313.307 
1.161.204.784 

203.516.940 
-21.638.960 
225.155.900 

381,163.350 

3.119.212,720 
-742,658,581 



5,434,443,715 1,131,951,255 36,990,218,499 4,302,492,460 3,861.871,301 



TABLE 8.5 

ANALYSIS OF ACTUARIAL DEFICIENCY ADJUSTMENTS FOR 1984-85 
(in millions of dollars) 



Toul 



Arising from salary increments Arising from actuarial valuations 

Canadian Royal Canadian Canadian Royal Canadian 

Public Service Forces Mounted Public Service Forces Mounted 

Super- Super- Police Super- Super- Police 

annuation annuation Superannuation Sub- annuation annuation Superannuation Sub- 

Account Account Account total Account Account Account totol 

Actuarial deficiency adjustments 

recognized*') 1,778 1,012 94 2.884 

Less: amount amortized to March 

31. 1984 1,125 592 63 1.780 

Unamortized balance at March 31, 

1984 653 420 31 1.104 

Add: current year actuarial defic- 
iency adjustments 

L«jj; current year amortization... 356 202 19 577 

Unamortized balance at March 31. 

1985 297 218 12 527 

*') Represents actuarial deficiency adjustments recognized prior to 1984-85 for which the amounts have not yet been fully amortized. 
TABLE 8.6 



2.884 
1.780 



1.104 

577 



527 



SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS IN SUPERANNUATION ACCOUNTS THAT RESULTED IN CHARGES TO 
BUDGETARY EXPENDITURE 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 

Statutory 
Net payments 

amortization under 

of Supplementary 
actuarial Retirement Interest*') 
Government deficiency Benefits 
contributions adjustments*') Account A B Total 1983-84 

Public Service Superannuation Account 373 421 1.615 356 2.765 2,471 

Canadian Forces Superannuation Account 212 236 1.125 202 1.775 1.598 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Account 67 19 157 19 262 231 

Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account 100 260 360 279 

Total 752 676 3.157 577 5.162 4.579 

*') Column A represents interest earnings credited to the Accounts. Column B represents interest earnings in excess of 6.5% on each respective Account which were 
charged to interest on public debt, and applied against the amortization of actuarial deficiency adjustmenu. For 1984-85. net amortization charges were reduced to 
nil. 



8'6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Public Service Superannuation Account 

This account is operated under the Public Service Superan- 
nuation Act. 

The unamortized portion of the actuarial deficiency in the 
Public Service Superannuation Account is $297 million, com- 
pared with $653 million at March 31, 1984. During the year, 
$356 million was amortized as a charge to budgetary expendi- 
ture, all of which was charged to interest on public debt. 

TABLE 8.7 

PUBLIC SERVICE SUPERANNUATION ACCOUNT 

1984-85 1983-84 

$ $ 

Opening balance 17,980,598,737 16,367,957,784 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions — 

Government employees 379,102,314 362,010,848 

Retired employees 13,656,120 11,760,707 

Public Service corporation employees 1 24, 1 44,744 1 20,454, 1 66 

Matching contributions — 

Government 372,905,203 348,779,754 

Public Service corporations 121,979,063 118,466,056 

Transfers from other pension funds 7,298,198 8,935,121 

Interest 1,615,140,017 1,260,717,401 

Actuarial liability adjustment^') 

2.634.225.659 2.231.124.053 

20,614,824,396 18,599,081,837 
PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Annuities 637,363,120 567,812,695 

Cash termination allowances 285,788 305,596 

Minimum benefits 9,139,294 7,827,392 

Returns of contributions — 

Government employees 30,741,080 25,824,686 

Public Service corporation employees 12,290,799 9,828,264 

Transfers to other pension funds 5,365,413 6,884,467 

695.185.494 618.483.100 
Closing balance 19,919,638,902 17,980,598,737 

<" An actuarial liability adjustment is made with respect to salary increases 
authorized during the year in excess of 5.5%. No adjustment was required in 
1983-84 and 1984-85. 



Canadian Forces Superannuation Account 

This account is operated under the Canadian Forces Super- 
annuation Act. 



The unamortized portion of the actuarial deficiency in the 
Canadian Forces Superannuation Account is $218 million, 
compared with $420 million at March 31, 1984. During the 
year, $202 million was amortized as a charge to budgetary 
expenditure, all of which was charged to interest on public 
debt. 

TABLE 8.8 

CANADIAN FORCES SUPERANNUATION ACCOUNT 

1984-85 1983-84 

$ $ 

Opening balance 12,268,197,318 1 1,346,305,841 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions by personnel 1 19,846,665 1 13,166,394 

Contributions by the Government 212,109,856 200,198,963 

Interest 1,125,1 15,220 932,496,074 

Actuarial liability adjustment^'' 19,936,000 

Other 2,1 15,520 1,720,619 

1.459.187.261 1.267.518.050 

13,727,384,579 12,613,823,891 

PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Pensions and retiring allowances payments .. 362,822,818 335,940,102 
Cash termination allowances and returns of 

contributions 12,039,717 7,984,849 

Transfers to Public Service Superannuation 

Account (Treasury Board) 755,930 1,631,119 

Other 44,432 70,503 

375.662.897 345.626.573 

Closing balance 13,351,721,682 12,268,197,318 

'''An actuarial liability adjustment is made with respect to salary increases 
authorized during the year in excess of 5.5%. No adjustment was required in 
1984-85. 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation 
Account 

This account is operated under the Royal Canadian Mount- 
ed Police Superannuation Act. 

The unamortized portion of the actuarial deficiency in the 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Account is 
$12 million, compared with $31 million at March 31, 1984. 
During the year, $19 million was amortized as a charge to 
budgetary expenditure, all of which was charged to interest on 
public debt. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 
TABLE 8.9 

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE SUPERAN- 
NUATION ACCOUNT 



1984-85 



1983-84 



S S 

Opening balance 1,595,055,91 1 1,391,538,971 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions from personnel (current and 

arrears) 33.837.986 33,781,563 

Contributions by the Government (statu- 
tory) 67,447.1 1 1 64,650.413 

Interest 156.956.351 127,451,997 

Actuarial liability adjustment^') 

Transfers from other pension funds 121,31 1 

258.362.759 225.883.973 
1,853,418,670 1,617.422,944 

PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Annuities and allowances payments 23,628,51 1 20,827,474 

Cash termination allowances and returns of 

contributions 1,472,583 1,273,107 

Transfers to other pension funds 92,237 140,140 

Interest on returns of contributions 151,438 126,312 

25.344.769 22.367.033 

Closing balance 1,828,073,901 1,595,055,91 1 

^'* An actuarial liability adjustment is made with respect to salary increases 
authorized during the year in excess of 5.5%. No adjustment was required in 
1983-84 and 1984-85. 



Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account 

This account was established by the Supplementary Retire- 
ment Benefits Act, to provide for the payment of increased 



8*7 



pension benefits resulting from indexation. Actuarial valuation 
of the Account is not required by the legislation. 

The Chief Actuary of the Department of Insurance has 
estimated that the actuarial present value of unfunded supple- 
mentary retirement benefits, including provision for future 
indexation, in respect of benefits earned as at March 31, 1985, 
payable to active or retired contributors or their dependants 
pursuant to the Public Service, Canadian Forces and Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police Superannuation Acts, was $15.5 
billion ($15.8 billion as at March 31, 1984). This amount is 
based on an assumed interest rate of 6.5%, and other assump- 
tions as described in the last tabled actuarial reports on those 
three superannuation accounts. It would be substantially 
reduced, if an appropriate allowance is made for the relatively 
high rates of interest that will be credited to the accounts at 
least for a number of years. This is currently under study. 

Increased superannuation benefits paid during the year due 
to indexation amounted to $700 million ($631 million in 
1983-84), of which $676 million ($604 million in 1983-84) 
represents benefits to superannuates in excess of their share of 
contributions to the account which has been charged to 
budgetary expenditure. The payments charged to budgetary 
expenditure on behalf of contributors amounted to $421 mil- 
lion ($380 million in 1983-84) for the Public Service Superan- 
nuation Account, $236 million ($207 million in 1983-84) for 
the Canadian Forces Superannuation Account, and $19 mil- 
lion ($17 million in 1983-84) for the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police Superannuation Account. An amount of $24 million 
($27 million in 1983-84) was charged to the Supplementary 
Retirement Benefits Account. 



TABLE 8.10 

SUPPLEMENTARY RETIREMENT BENEFITS ACCOUNT 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Opening balance 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CRED- 
ITS— 

Employee contributions — 

Public Service corporations 

Government 

Matching contributions — 

Public Service corporations 

Government 

Interest 

Transfers from other pension funds 



PAYMENTS AND OTHER 
CHARGES— 

Annuities 

Cash termination allowances 

Minimum binefits 

Returns of contributions — 

Public Service corporations 

Government 

Transfers to other pension funds.. 

Closing balance 



Public Service 


Canadian Forces 


Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police 


Parliament 


Others 


Total 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1984-85 


1983-84 


1,440,193 


1,156,757 


399,205 


324,034 


100,973 


80,073 


3,375 


2,693 


3,722 


2,748 


1.947.468 


1.566.305 


23,092 
70,232 


22,146 
66,336 


22,448 


21,182 


6,084 


6,043 


270 


214 


392 


338 


23,092 
99,426 


22.146 
94.113 


23,405 
70,248 

192,774 
113 

379.864 


22,543 
66,350 

136,638 
214 

314.227 


22,517 

53,210 

6 

98.181 


21,047 

38,166 

4 

80.399 


6,083 

13,372 

14 

25.553 


6,040 

9,352 

13 

21.448 


245 
361 

876 


207 
288 

709 


395 
454 

1.241 


337 
309 

984 


23,405 
99.488 

260,171 
133 

505.715 


22,543 
93,981 

184,753 
231 

417.767 


1,820,057 


1,470,984 


497,386 


404,433 


126,526 


101,521 


4,251 


3,402 


4,963 


3,732 


2,453,183 


1,984,072 


19.684 

28 

356 


23,355 

28 

245 


4,354 


3,710 


309 


302 


9 


7 


9 


10 


24,365 

28 

356 


27,384 

28 

245 


2,221 

5,669 

498 

28.456 


1,765 

4,568 

830 

30.791 


2,052 

60 

6.466 


1,363 

155 

5.228 


278 

13 

600 


229 

17 

548 


218 
227 


20 
27 


9 


10 


2,221 

8,217 

571 

35.758 


1,765 

6,180 

1,002 

36.604 


1,791,601 


1,440,193 


490,920 


399,205 


125,926 


100,973 


4,024 


3,375 


4,954 


3,722 


2,417,425 


1.947,468 



8*8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Unemployment Insurance Account 

The Unemployment Insurance Act provides for a compulso- 
ry contributory unemployment insurance program applicable 
to all employees, with few exceptions. 

The Act authorizes an account in the accounts of Canada to 
be known as the Unemployment Insurance Account. 

The Act provides that the following be credited to the 
Account: (a) premiums, fines, penalties and interest; (b) Gov- 
ernment share of benefits paid; (c) refunds of overpayments of 
benefits, and benefit repayments; (d) amounts for services 
rendered to other Government departments or agencies, or to 
the public; (e) amounts provided for any other purpose related 
to unemployment insurance and authorized by an appropria- 
tion administered by the Canada Employment and Immigra- 
tion Commission; and, (/) interest on the balance of the 
Account at such rates as the Minister of Finance may author- 
ize. The Act also provides that the following be charged to the 
Account: (a) benefits paid under the Act; (b) costs of adminis- 
tering the Act; and, (c) interest on advances made by the 
Minister of Finance. 

Maximum weekly employee premiums were $9.78 from 
April 1, 1984 to December 31, 1984 and $10.81 from January 
1, 1985 to March 31, 1985. For the same periods, maximum 
weekly benefits were $255 from April 1, 1984 to December 31, 
1984 and $276 from January 1, 1985 to March 31, 1985. 

Interest bearing loans are made to the Unemployment In- 
surance Account, under Section 137(1) of the Unemployment 
Insurance Act, as a result of deficiencies in contributions from 
employers and employees. The balance outstanding as at 
March 31, 1985 bears interest at rates between 9.875% and 
13.25% per annum, and is repayable between April 30, 1985 
and February 21, 1987. The balance outstanding at year end is 
deducted from the balance of the Unemployment Insurance 
Account, to show the net position of the Account. 

TABLE 8.11 



Government Annuities Account 

This account was established by the Government Annuities 
Act, and modified by the Government Annuities Improvement 
Act, which discontinued sales of annuities in 1975. The 
account is valued on an actuarial basis each year, with the 
deficit or surplus charged or credited to the Consolidated 
Revenue Fund. 

The purpose of the Government Annuities Act was to assist 
Canadians to provide for their later years, by the purchase of 
Government annuities. The Government Annuities Improve- 
ment Act increased the rate of return and flexibility of Gov- 
ernment annuity contracts, and discontinued sales of annuities 
in 1975. 

Receipts and other credits consist of premiums received, 
funds reclaimed from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for 
previously unlocated annuitants, earned interest and items 
transferred from previous years' revenue to cover the actuarial 
deficit. Payments and other charges represent matured annui- 
ties, the commuted value of death benefits, premium refunds 
and withdrawals, and actuarial surpluses and unclaimed items 
transferred to non-tax revenue. The amounts of unclaimed 
annuities, related to annuitants who cannot be located, are 
transferred to non-tax revenue. 

Deposit and Trust Accounts 

Deposit and trust accounts is a group of liabilities represent- 
ing the Government's financial obligations in its role as 
administrator of certain moneys that it has received or collect- 
ed for specified purposes and that it will pay out accordingly. 
To the extent that the funds received are represented by 
securities, these are deducted from the corresponding accounts 
to show the Government's net liability. 

Table 8.12 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions in deposit and trust accounts. 



TRANSACTIONS IN THE UNEMPLOYMENT 
INSURANCE ACCOUNT 

(in millions of dollars) 



1984-85 



1983-84 



RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions — 

Employee and employer 

Government 

Investment income 

Interest bearing loans from the Government 

PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Benefits 

Expenses 

Interest expense 

Repayments of interest bearing loans to the 
Government 

Net increase or decrease ( - ) 

Add — Balance at beginning of year 

Balance at end of year 



7,777 


7,465 


2,788 


2,714 


2 


1 


4,040 


775 


14,607 


10.955 


9,890 


9,676 


912 


846 


741 


117 


3,048 


342 


14,591 


10,981 


16 


-26 


-278 


-252 



262 



278 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

TABLE 8.12 

DEPOSIT AND TRUST ACCOUNTS 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



8*9 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



Departmental deposit and trust accounts — 

Agriculture — 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits 

Prairie farm emergency fund 

Western grain stabilization account 

Communications — 
Public Archives — 
Deposit account 

Consumer and Corporate Affairs — 

Deposit account 

Estate fund — Bankruptcy Act 

Security deposits — Bankruptcy Act 

Less: securities held in trust 

Shares in trust — Bankruptcy Act 

Less: securities held in trust 

Share proceeds in trust — Bankruptcy Act .. 
Unclaimed dividends and undistributed 
assets — 

Bankruptcy Act 

Canada Business Corporations Act 

Winding-up Act 

Employment and Immigration — 

Immigration guarantee fund 

Less: securities held in trust 

Employment expansion and development 
program 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Guarantee deposits — Oil and gas 

Less: securities held in trust 

Market development incentive payments — 
Alberta 

Miscellaneous projects' def>osits 

Atomic Energy Control Board — 
Nuclear liability reinsurance account 

National Energy Board- 
Oil export charges revenue sharing 
account 

Environment — 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits 

Guarantee deposits 

Less: securities held in trust 

National Battlefields Commission — 
Trust fund 

External Affairs — 

Canada Foundation account 

Less: securities held in trust 

deposits in a special bank account .. 

Cost recoverable technical assistance pro- 
gram 

Fairs and missions 

Canadian International Development 
Agency — 

Guarantee dep)osits 

International agencies — Travel account .. 

( International Joint Commission — 

In-Situ contaminants workshop 



9,066,972 
932,365,679 
941.432.651 



28 

132,601 

74,250 

7,000 

7,000 

31,756 
31,756 

52,863 



212,790 

272,572,959 
272.785.749 



58 

370,847 



490 

490 
5,025 



113,653 

234,424,193 
234.537.846 



86 

354,234 
74,250 



490 
490 



3,065,045 

81,495 

140,622 

3.546.876 


963,750 
6,877 

1.346.989 


922,066 

1,275 

325 

1.352.640 


5,217,411 

65,000 

5.152.411 


2,998,030 

15,000 

3.013.030 


2,323,085 
2.323.085 


94,256 
5.246.667 


228,477 
3.241.507 


277,973 
2.601.058 


54,757,520 

54,730,759 

26.761 


8,769,241 
30,000,000 
38.769.241 


30,026,761 

8,769,241 

38.796.002 


40,307 


75,000,000 
1,426,216 


75,000,000 
1,449,187 


526,682 


1,660 




593.750 


268,786,391 
383.983.508 


268,786.391 
384.031.580 


620,276 
24,000 
24,000 


752,513 
92.000 
14,000 

106.000 


1,015.504 

106.000 
106.000 


620.276 


109.659 
968.172 


1.121.504 


305,320 

264,608 

40,712 


19,296 
382,665 
201,537 
603.498 


67,928 
166,277 
369,293 
603.498 


1,597,649 
447,069 


2,277,119 
2,020,989 


3,197,274 
2.097.428 


140,218 

28,420 

168.638 


103,389 
103.389 


105.618 

96.690 

202.308 


2.213.356 


47,000 
5.051.995 


45.959 
6.146.467 



99,137 

9,066,972 

970,514,445 

979.680.554 



149,214 

7.000 
7,000 

31.266 
31.266 

57.888 



3,106,729 

87,097 

140,297 

3.541.225 

5,892,356 

50,000 

5.842.356 

44,760 
5.887.116 



33,500,000 
33,500.000 



17.336 
528,342 

545.678 

357,285 
116.000 
116.000 



109.659 
466.944 

256.688 

48.220 

208,468 



677,494 
370,630 



34.600 
35,119 
69.719 

1,041 
1.118.884 



99,137 

38,148,766 
38.247.903 



-28 

16,613 
- 74,250 



-490 
-490 

5,025 



- 48.072 

- 262,991 
92,000 
92,000 



109.659 
153.332 

- 48.632 
216,388 
167.756 



-920,155 
- 76,439 



- 105,618 

6,699 

-98.919 

1,041 
1.094.472 



248,395.363 
248.395.363 



1.880 



490 
490 



4,210 



41.684 
5,602 
-325 

- 5.651 


717,563 

-39,197 

- 606,788 

77.668 


674,945 
-15,000 
689.945 


676,131 

10,000 

666.131 


- 49,496 
640.449 


29,256 
695.387 


21,257,520 

21,230,759 

- 26.761 


- 1,086,780 

- 1,086,772 

-8 


-22.971 


- 74,329 


1,660 


3,000 



- 71.337 

514.215 
-51,000 
-51,000 



514.215 

- 14,008 

-21,069 

7.061 



1,597,649 
72,840 



-1,513 
9,028 
7.515 



1.678.004 



8-10 

TABLE 8.12 
DEPOSIT AND TRUST ACCOUNTS— Continued 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Finance — 
Common school funds — Ontario and 

Quebec 

Foreign claims fund 

Halifax 1917 explosion pension account 

Less: securities held in trust 

Investors' indemnity fund 

War claims fund — World War II 

Office of the Auditor General — 
Sino-Canadian audit management train- 
ing 

Fisheries and Oceans — 
Great Lakes Fishery Commission — 

Lamprey research and control 

Guarantee deposits 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development — 

Guarantee deposits 

Less: securities held in trust 

Fines — Indian Act 

Guarantee deposits — Reserve resources 

Less: securities held in trust 

Guarantee deposits — Rotating herds 

Indian agencies revenue trust bank ac- 
counts 

Less: deposits in special bank accounts .... 

Indian band funds 

Indian band funds — Shares and certificates 
L«5.$.' securities held in trust 

Indian compensation funds 

Indian estate accounts 

Less: securities held in trust 

Land assurance fund 

Indian contributions to the subsidy housing 

program 

Indian moneys suspense account 

Indian savings accounts 

Indian special accounts 

Justice — 
Federal Court special account 

Labour — 

Fair wages suspense account 

Labour Standards suspense account 

National Defence — 

Estates — Armed services 

Foreign governments — 
United Kingdom — 

British Army — Suffield, Alberta 

— Other activities 

United States of America 

Federal Republic of Germany — 

German Army — Shilo, Manitoba 

— Other activities 

Netherlands 

Provinces of Canada 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO)— 

Infrastructure projects 

Other projects 

Non-government agencies 

Herbert Lott naval trust fund 



2,677,771 






2,677,771 






1,642,734 


325,076 


230,162 


1,737,648 


94,914 


-905,912 


1,183,651 


106,240 


163,717 


1,126,174 


- 57,477 


- 73,654 


190,000 






190,000 




- 225,000 


993.651 


106.240 


163.717 


936,174 


- 57.477 


151.346 


27,895 




3,168 


24,727 


-3.168 




9,089,198 


911,380 


59.873 


9,940,705 


851.507 


690.738 




56,200 


29,965 


26,235 


26,235 




14.431.249 


1,398,896 


486.885 


15,343.260 


912.011 


- 63.828 


143,403 


253,142 


385,186 


11,359 


-132,044 


46.174 


3,010 


4,600 


7,610 




-3,010 


110 


355,716 


34,893 


343,559 


47,050 


- 308,666 


298,898 


502.129 


292,635 


736,355 


58.409 


- 443.720 


345.182 


103,778,302 


129,446,697 


91,076,574 


142,148,425 


38,370,123 


85,165,035 


103,464,107 


90,837,933 


129,172,826 


141,799,000 


38,334,893 


85,207,162 


314.195 


220.284.630 


220.249.400 


349.425 


35.230 


-42.127 


971,524 


102,276 


415,081 


658,719 


-312,805 


-80,521 


671,410 


51,852 


267,834 


455,428 


-215,982 


27,331 


6,000 


6,000 






-6,000 




665,410 


57.852 


267.834 


455.428 


- 209.982 


27.331 


10,143 


9,308 


8,273 


11,178 


1,035 


2,677 


118,188 


3,007,325 


3,052,289 


73,224 


- 44,964 


- 145,619 


118,188 


3,052,289 
6,059,614 


3,007,325 
6,059,614 


73,224 


- 44,964 


- 145,619 


587,470,745 


461,882,638 


267,829,133 


781,524,250 


194,053.505 


160,299.556 


20.000 






20,000 




- 3.060 


20,000 






20,000 




- 3.060 


97,561 


16,490 


1,451 


112,600 


15,039 


10,792 


11,124,913 


6,882,218 


4,123,173 


13,883,958 


2,759,045 


1.431.854 


5,050 




113 


5,163 


113 




11,119.863 


6,882.218 


4.123,286 


13.878.795 


2.758.932 


1.431.854 


662,306 


70,880 




733,186 


70,880 


45,701 


19,959 






19,959 






23,291,350 


22,780,669 


23,564,643 


22,507,376 


- 783,974 


5,103,488 


53,352,150 


29,245,761 


5,718,780 


76,879,131 


23,526,981 


18,965,424 


342,425 


521,060 


274,924 


588,561 


246,136 


102,770 


678.317.631 


747.913.396 


528.512.419 


897,718.608 


219.400.977 


185,866,945 



3,902,323 



186,655 



7,107,409 



2,209,943 



8,799,789 



4,897,466 



2,607.549 



2,429.365 



364.839 



178.184 



7.277.578 



46.261 


146.025 


121.791 


70,495 


24,234 


-13,149 


266.474 


24.089 


211.476 


79,087 


- 187,387 


-138,567 


312.735 


170,114 


333.267 


149,582 


- 163,153 


-151,716 



23,036 



3,032,958 

- 275,430 

53,015 


30,079,407 
2,907,935 
5,148,565 


24.697,892 
2.527.061 
2.890,276 


8,414,473 

105.444 

2.311.304 


5,381.515 

380.874 

2.258,289 


1,120,713 

- 478,452 

- 156,082 


3,029,229 

384,741 

1,149,093 


8,333,427 
2.002,596 

344,105 


7,429.227 

2.895.662 

1,149,093 

344.105 


3.933,429 
- 508.325 


904.200 

- 893.066 

- 1,149,093 


-67,161 

384,741 

- 264,278 


1,146.315 

100,824 

2,252,939 

972 

11,061,311 


578,863 

876 

3,588.199 

6.588 

55,598.110 


462,452 

876 

3,558,905 

6,614 

48.391.528 


1,262,726 

100,824 

2,282,233 

946 

18.267.893 


116,411 

29,294 

-26 

7.206.582 


240,001 

-150,800 

44 

605.690 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

TABLE 8.12 

DEPOSIT AND TRUST ACCOUNTS— Co«r//iM?^ 



8*11 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



National Health and Welfare — 
Health insurance supplementary account .... 

Inuvik General Hospital 

Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital 

World Health Organization 

Medical Research Council — 
Donations and bequests 

National Revenue — 
Customs and Excise — 

Guarantee deposits 

Less: securities held in trust 

Temporary deposits received from 

importers 

Less: deposits in special bank accounts 



Privy Council — 
Chief Electoral Officer — Candidates' elec- 
tion deposits 

Public Works— 
Harbourfront capital account 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 

Fairs, shows and seminars 

Science and Technology — 
Natural Sciences and Engineering 
Research Council — Donation trust fund .. 

Secretary of State — 
Promotion of official languages 

Solicitor General — 
Correctional Service — 

Inmates' trust fund 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — 

Benefit fund 

Supply and Services — 

Interest on bonds — Insurance companies .... 

Military purchases excess funds deposit 

Z.«5J.- securities held in trust 

Petro-Canada Enterprises Inc — Unclaimed 

shares 

Statistics Canada — 

Advance payments 

Contractors' security deposits (sundry 
departments) — 

Bonds 

Less: securities held in trust 

Cash 

Certified cheques 

Less: securities held in trust 

Transport — 

Maritime pollution claims fund 

Unclaimed moneys due to Canadian 
seamen 



April 1/1984 


Receipts and 
other credits 


Payments and 
other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


$ 


S 


S 


S 


S 


S 


43,687 

2,773 

2,382 

116,099 


1,583 

1,376 
85.053 


16.883 
86.441 


28,387 

2,773 

3,758 

114.711 


- 15.300 

1.376 
- 1.388 


- 1.755 
2,773 

- 3,307 
56.624 


79,603 
244.544 


8,176 
96.188 


8.700 
112.024 


79,079 
228.708 


-524 
- 15.836 


- 18,132 
36.203 


5,607,037 

5,344,900 

262.137 


2,469.496 
2,379,400 
4.848.896 


2.482,019 
2.413.000 
4.895.019 


5,594.514 

5,378.500 

216.014 


-12,523 

33,600 

-46.123 


-413,760 

- 474.500 

60.740 


2,420,406 
2,420,406 

262.137 


953,152 

953.152 
5.802.048 


953.152 

953.152 

5,848,171 


3.373.558 
3.373.558 

216,014 


953,152 
953.152 

-46.123 


264.068 
264.068 

60.740 


5,200 


290.400 


138.200 


157,400 


152.200 


3.200 




3,841,370 




3,841,370 


3.841.370 




84,722 


129.512 


184.295 


29,939 


- 54,783 


-136.303 


1,050 


20.000 




21.050 


20,000 




16,104 


13.422 




29,526 


13,422 


16.104 


5,120,130 


14.971,096 


14.742,386 


5,348,840 


228.710 


27.327 


1,641,740 
6.761.870 


201,650 
15.172.746 


45.366 
14.787,752 


1,798,024 
7.146.864 


156.284 
384.994 


126,141 
153.468 


140,403,200 
140,403,200 


34,064.664 
2,119,994.775 
1,992,852,644 
4.112.847.419 


34,060.727 
1,992.852,644 
2,119,994,775 
4.112.847.419 


3,937 
267,545,331 
267.545.331 


3.937 
127,142,131 
127,142,131 


38,581.086 
38,581.086 


5,962,909 




80.734 


5.882.175 


- 80,734 


5,962,909 


621,821 


10.550.380 


10.417.827 


754.374 


132,553 


306,076 


3,875,756 
3,875,756 

15,224,049 

2,182,448 

1,323,708 

858.740 

22.667.519 


11.463,645 

5.555,713 

17.019.358 

27.763.247 

1.617.218 

1.795.504 

3.412.722 

4.205.657.790 


6,303,501 

10,715,857 

17.019.358 

23.293,026 

2.763.136 

1.483,277 

4,246.413 

4.201.965.504 


9.035,900 
9,035,900 

19,694,270 

1,036,530 

1,011.481 

25.049 

26.359.805 


5,160,144 
5,160.144 

4,470,221 
- 1,145,918 
-312,227 
- 833.691 
3.692.286 


- 879.501 

- 880,932 

1.431 

3.946,163 

1.192,151 

797,580 

394.571 

10.611.150 


93,904,188 


21.127.617 


11,750,599 


103,281.206 


9,377,018 


9.310.127 


3,373 
93.907.561 


21.127.617 


11.750.599 


3.373 
103.284.579 


9.377.018 


9.310.127 



8M2 

TABLE 8.12 

DEPOSIT AND TRUST \CCOV^TS— Continued 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Treasury Board — 
National Lottery account 

Veterans Affairs — 

Administered trust accounts 

Less: securities held in trust 

Army benevolent fund 

Canadian Forces personnel assistance fund 

Estates fund 

Less: securities held in trust 

Ste-Anne's Hospital 

Veterans administration and welfare trust 

fund 

Less: securities held in trust 

Veterans care trust accounts 

Less: securities held in trust 

Provincial sales tax — 
Communications — 

National Library 

Public Archives 

Solicitor General — 

Correctional Service 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 



Instalments (payroll deductions) made by 
employees in the purchase of Canada 
savings bonds — 

National Defence 14,376,948 

Solicitor General — Royal Canadian 

Mounted Police 6,948,880 

Supply and Services 54,056,174 

75.382.002 
Accounts without current transactions 

Total departmental deposit and trust accounts... 1,914,757,381 

Crown corporations' deposits — 

Agriculture — 
Canadian Dairy Commission account 3,755 

Finance — 
Crown corporations' surplus moneys — 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 8,000,000 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The 5,000,000 

13.000.000 

National Revenue — 
Canada Post Corporation account 332,989,870 

Supply and Services — 

Royal Canadian Mint account 17,629,922 

Transport — 
Canadian National (West Indies) Steam- 
ships Ltd 95,000 

Accounts without current transactions 

ToUl Crown corporations' deposiu 363,718,547 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 





Receipts and 


Payments and 








April 1/1984 


other credits 


other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


$ 


$ 


S 


$ 


S 


S 


117,251 


16,586,879 




16,704,130 


16,586,879 




41,037,060 


13,281.750 


10,709,350 


43,609,460 


2,572,400 


2,057,330 


40,000 






40,000 




-13,000 


40.997.060 


13.281.750 


10.709.350 


43.569.460 


2.572.400 


2.070.330 


1,281,251 


Ano,5ii 


620,019 


1.131,809 


- 149,442 


- 122,228 


68,425 


1,361 


65,617 


4,169 


- 64.256 


-43,241 


739,398 


2,560,114 


2,505,739 


793,773 


54,375 


- 608,873 


1,300 


1,300 






-1,300 


281 


738.098 


2.561.414 


2.505.739 


793.773 


55.675 


-609.154 


661,102 


964,939 


514,676 


1,111,365 


450,263 


611,408 


653,539 


1,269,223 


1,202,048 


720,714 


67,175 


39,392 


272,644 


86.737 


116,203 


302,110 


29,466 


- 14,426 


380.895 


1.355.960 


1.318.251 


418.604 


37.709 


53.818 


9,251,237 


7,710,818 


7,389,698 


9,572,357 


321,120 


421,160 


5,140 


35 




5,105 


-35 


-257 


9.246.097 


7.710.853 


7.389.698 


9.567.252 


321.155 


421.417 


53.372.928 


26.346.854 


23.123.350 


56.596.432 


3.223.504 


2.382.350 


1.115 


135 


1,248 


2 


-1.113 


944 


1,167 


7.044 


7,489 


722 


-445 


600 


2.282 


7.179 


8.737 


724 


- 1.558 


1.544 


- 248,699 


87 


112,965 


-361,577 


-112.878 


- 138.982 


-72 


64,347 


64,401 


-126 


-54 


-11 


- 248.771 


64.434 


177.366 


- 361.703 


-112.932 


- 138.993 


- 246,489 


71.613 


186.103 


- 360.979 


-114.490 


- 137.449 



33.205,353 

16,023,995 
289,587,724 
338.817.072 



31,255,879 

15,252,352 
285,339,995 
331.848.226 



16,326,422 

7,720,523 
58,303.903 
82.350.848 



1.949.474 

771.643 
4,247,729 
6.968.846 



6,113,832,049 



5,800,405,802 



2.228.183.628 



313,426.247 



1.539,595,605 

8,000,000 
8.000.000 

6,273,950,158 

677,295,079 



1,519,038,629 



6,301,910,997 
673,146,500 



20,560,731 

8,000,000 
13,000,000 
21.000.000 

305,029,031 
21,778,501 

95,000 



20,556,976 



1,795,325 

975,761 

-813,794 

1.957.292 

- 3,487,798 



451,383,079 



2,800 



8,000,000 
8,000,000 4,000,000 

8.000.000 12,000.000 

27,960,839 101,307,311 

4,148,579 - 14,807,506 



20,659,935 



8,498,840,842 



8,494,096,126 



368,463,263 



4,744,716 



77,842,670 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

TABLE 8.12 

DEPOSIT AND TRUST ACCOUNTS— Conc/w</e</ 



8*13 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Payments received in advance — 

Agriculture — 

Fees paid in advance — Importation of for- 
eign cattle 184,723 

Importation of Dutch bulbs 122 

184.845 

Justice — Federal Court fees 5,000 

Public Works — Shared-cost projects 957,622 

Science and Technology — National Research 

Council— Trust fund 23,049 

Total payments received in advance 1,170,516 

Balances to the credit of departments and 
departmental corporations — 

Communications — 
National Museums of Canada — 

Trust account 391,342 

Less: securities held in trust 2,000 

389,342 
National Library — Special operating 

account 52,466 

441.808 

Science and Technology — 
National Research Council— Special fund .. 8,000,000 

Natural Sciences and Engineering 

Research Council— Trust fund 218,035 

8.218.035 

Secretary of State — 
Social Sciences and Humanities Research 
Council — 

Queen's Fellowship fund 329,190 

Less: securities held in trust 250,000 

79.190 

Trust fund 

79.190 

Veterans Affairs — 
Soldier Settlement and Veterans' Land 
Act — 
Veterans' Land Act trust account general 713,137 

Communications — 

Public Archives — Mackenzie King trust 
account 278,302 

Finance — 
Custodian administration account 1,303,138 

Solicitor General — 
Correctional Service — 

Federal sales tax 

Total balances to the credit of departments and 
departmental corporations 

Toul 2,290,316,719 



55,666 

7,850 

63.516 


47,655 

7,060 

54.715 


192,734 

912 

193.646 


8.011 

790 

8.801 


53,140 
- 7,394 

45.746 


,895,531 


57,696,649 


5,000 
1,156,504 


198,882 


51.434 


36,864 


34,914 


24,999 


1,950 


-21.924 



57,995,911 



57,786,278 



1,380,149 



209,633 



75.256 



258.474 
258,474 


233,010 
233.010 


416,806 

2,000 

414,806 


25,464 
25.464 


-95,519 
- 95,519 


115.398 
373,872 


139,146 
372.156 


28.718 
443,524 


- 23,748 
1.716 


- 17,290 
-112,809 


12,530.122 


10.529,375 


10.000,747 


2.000.747 


3,500,000 


569.345 
13,099.467 


690.374 
11.219.749 


97,006 
10,097.753 


-121.029 
1,879.718 


32,038 
3,532.038 


33,094 
250,000 
283.094 

25,000 
308,094 


50.470 
50,470 
50.470 


311,814 

311.814 

25.000 

336,814 


- \1,IU 

- 250.000 

232.624 

25.000 

257,624 


-966 
-966 
-966 


5,503.989 


5.589,145 


627,981 


-85.156 


- 323.320 


28,728 


28.149 


278,881 
1,303,138 


579 


- 18,799 



- 363.335 




165,040 


- 528,375 


- 165,040 


- 210.808 


10.670,275 


19,314,150 


17,424,709 


12,559,716 


1,889.441 


2.865,336 



14,689,982,952 14,369,712,915 2.610.586.756 



320.270.037 



532.166,341 



8-14 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits — Agriculture 

These funds, which are for the furtherance of research work, 
are comprised of contributions from organizations and 
individuals. 

Prairie farm emergency fund 

The Prairie Farm Assistance Act provides for a levy of 1% 
to be deducted by all licensed purchasers of grain, the amount 
so deducted to be transferred to the Canadian Grain Commis- 
sion for deposit to the credit of a special account known as the 
Prairie farm emergency fund. The levy is not collected in 
respect of grain grown by farmers who participate in approved 
crop insurance programs. Collection of the levy was discon- 
tinued, effective August 1972. 

Western grain stabilization account 

The purpose of the Western Grain Stabilization Act is to 
protect prairie grain producers from unexpected and large 
income declines, through the stabilization of returns on the 
production and sale of wheat, oats, barley, rye, mustard seed, 
canola and flax seed as well as any other seed that may be 
prescribed which is: (a) produced in the designated area and, 
(b) named in Schedule 1 to the Canada Grain Act and 
designated therein as "Canada Western". 

This account records funds for this purpose which are 
received from: 

(a) levies paid by participating producers — Ranging from 
1% to 2'/2% of grain sales proceeds to an annual max- 
imum of $60,000 eligible proceeds per participant; 

(b) Government contributions equal to levies paid by pro- 
ducers plus an additional 2% of the participating eli- 
gible grain sales proceeds of all participants; and, 

(c) interest on the amount standing to the credit of the 
stabilization account, at rates and in accordance with 
terms and conditions determined by the Minister of 
Finance. 

Deposit account — Public Archives 

This account records advance payments received in connec- 
tion with the sale of microfilm and reproductions. 

Deposit account — Consumer and Corporate Affairs 

This account records moneys held in trust to defray the cost 
of services provided on a regular basis, by the department. No 
interest is credited to the account. 

Estate fund — Bankruptcy Act 

Under the provisions of Section 5(9) of the Bankruptcy Act, 
the Superintendent, for the protection of an estate, may 
require that funds of the estate be remitted to the Receiver 
General, pending the appointment of a trustee. This account 
was credited with funds so remitted, and was charged with 
disbursements to appointed trustees. 

During the year, this account was closed and the outstand- 
ing balance was transferred to non-tax revenue. 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 
Security deposits — Bankruptcy Act 

This account represents liabilities to authorized trustees 
under the Bankruptcy Act, for securities held in trust. The 
account is credited with securities deposited by trustees, and is 
charged with securities returned to them. 

Shares in trust — Bankruptcy Act 

This account represents the value of share certificates origi- 
nally held by a bankrupt stockbroker, on behalf of clients who 
have not been located. 

Share proceeds in trust — Bankruptcy Act 

This account represents dividends paid on stocks originally 
held by a bankrupt stockbroker but subsequently sold to 
clients. As the stocks were not registered in the clients' names, 
the dividends must be paid to the last registered owner, in this 
case, the stockbroker. The dividends are now forwarded to the 
Superintendent of Bankruptcy for safekeeping. 

Unclaimed dividends and undistributed assets — Bankruptcy 
Act 

This account represents amounts credited to the Receiver 
General in accordance with provisions of Section 125 of the 
Bankruptcy Act, pending distribution to creditors. 

Unclaimed dividends and undistributed assets — Canada Busi- 
ness Corporations Act 

This account represents liabilities to creditors and share- 
holders who have not been located. The account is charged 
when funds are paid to them. 

Unclaimed dividends and undistributed assets — Winding-up 
Act 

This account records amounts credited to the Receiver 
General, in accordance with provisions of the relevant Act, 
pending distribution. 

Immigration guarantee fund 

This account records amounts collected and held pending 
final disposition, either by refund to the original depositor, or 
forfeiture to the Crown. 

During the year, withdrawals totalled $2,323,085 and con- 
sisted of refunds to depositors, $1,890,015; departmental 
expenses recovered from deposits, $15,592; and, forfeitures to 
the Crown, $417,478. 

Employment expansion and development program 

The employment expansion and development program is 
jointly funded by the federal and provincial governments. 

This account records advance payments made by provinces 
against their share of the cost of projects, and held in trust 
pending disbursements to project sponsors. During the year, 
deposits totalled $228,477 and disbursements totalled 
$277,973, consisting of $130,091 in payments to sponsors, and 
$147,882 in refunds to provinces. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE A CCOVNTS 
Guarantee deposits — Oil and gas 

This account records cash deposited with the department as 
guarantees for oil, gas and mining rights. Interest is not paid 
on cash deposits. 

Also recorded in this account are securities deposited with 
the department as guarantees for oil, gas and mineral rights. 

Market development incentive payments — Alberta 

This account records moneys received from the Government 
of Alberta, to encourage the expansion of natural gas markets 
in provinces east of Alberta, for the period November 1, 1981 
to January 31, 1987. These moneys are received in accordance 
with an agreement between the Government of Canada and 
the Government of Alberta dated September 1, 1981. During 
1984-85, payments to provincial and municipal utilities, and 
eligible recipients, were $20.5 million under the Gas Market- 
ing Assistance Program; $57 million under the Distribution 
System Expansion Program; $7 million under the Industrial 
Conversion Assistance Program; $0.1 million under the Natu- 
ral Gas Fueling Stations; and, $0.4 million under the Natural 
Gas Vehicle Conversion Program. 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits — Energy, Mines and Re- 
sources 

These funds, which are for the furtherance of research work, 
are comprised of contributions from organizations and 
individuals. 

Nuclear liability reinsurance account 

This account was established to record premiums under the 
Nuclear Liability Act, to provide for payment of claims arising 
from accidents at an insured facility. 

Oil export charges revenue sharing account 

This account records the share of the oil export charges that 
is payable to oil producing provinces, in accordance with the 
Energy Administration Act. The share of oil export charges is 
in respect of oil produced in, and exported from, the provinces 
of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. 
The share pertains to oil export charges collected in 1984-85. 
Payments made to producing provinces are charged to this 
account. 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits — Environment 

These funds, which are for the furtherance of research work, 
are comprised of contributions from organizations and 
individuals. 

Guarantee deposits — Environment 

This account records amounts deposited with the depart- 
ment to ensure compliance with terms and conditions of 
contracts. 

Trust fund — National Battleflelds Commission 

This account was established at the creation of the National 
Battlefields Commission for the purpose of acquiring various 
properties for the development of the park. The moneys are 
received by way of private contributions, contributions from 
municipal corporations, provincial governments and others, 



8-15 

and deposited for the purposes of the Commission, as pre- 
scribed for in its Act of incorporation. Following the land 
acquisitions of the Commission, an amount of money remained 
in the account and increased over a period of years as a result 
of interest earned, while the Commission was listed in 
Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act, prior to 
September 1, 1984. 

Canada Foundation account 

This account records moneys received in connection with the 
Civilian Relief Agreement of 1950, and the Cultural Agree- 
ment of 1954, between Canada and Italy, and disbursements 
for the purposes of the said agreements. 

The account is maintained in Italian lira in the Banco di 
Roma, Italy, and all transactions recorded in foreign curren- 
cies during the year are converted at the rate of exchange 
prevailing at the close of the year (1984-85, 1 Lira/$0.0006968 
Cdn; 1983-84, 1 Lira/$0.00079 1 Cdn). 

During the year, income derived from the operation of the 
account amounted to Lira 27,693,234 — $19,296 Cdn, and 
disbursements for cultural activities and administrative 
expenses were Lira 45,303,982 — $31,568 Cdn. Adjustment of 
the book value carried forward from the previous year resulted 
in valuation decreases of $31,512 to securities held in trust, 
and $4,848 to cash on deposit. The closing balance consists of 
securities at cost and cash on deposit. 

Cost recoverable technical assistance program 

This account records prepayments and disbursements in 
respect of the costs pertaining to the provision of technical 
assistance to other countries by Canadian firms and institu- 
tions pursuant to agreements between the Government of 
Canada and other national governments. 

Fairs and missions 

This account records deposits which may be refunded, in 
part or in total, in accordance with contractual agreements 
concerning the participation of Canadian sector enterprises at 
international trade fairs. 

Guarantee deposits — Canadian International Development 
Agency 

This account records cheques for insurance claims related to 
damages to "in transit" goods being shipped to the country 
specified in the loan agreement, pending the decision of the 
country on the use of these moneys, to reduce the loan balance 
or to purchase replacement goods. 

International agencies — Travel account 

This account records funds made available by international 
agencies, to provide for payment of transportation of fellows 
and scholars who travel in Canada, under the sponsorship of 
such agencies. 

In-Situ contaminants workshop 

This account records funds received from the United States 
National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, to 
provide for payment of the publication of the workshop pro- 
ceedings on In-Situ contaminants. 



8*16 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Common school funds — Ontario and Quebec 

The funds represent the proceeds from the sale of lands set 
apart for the support and maintenance of common schools in 
Upper and Lower Canada, now Ontario and Quebec. Interest 
of $133,888, apportioned on the basis of population, is paid 
semi-annually to these provinces, at the rate of 5% per annum, 
and is charged to interest on public debt. 



Foreign claims fund 

This account records: (a) such part of the money received 
from the Custodian of Enemy Property, proceeds of the sale of 
property and the earnings of property, and, (b) all amounts 
received from governments of other countries pursuant to 
agreements entered into after April 1, 1966 relating to the 
settlement of Canadian claims, and also records payment of 
claims submitted, including payment of the expenses incurred 
in investigating and reporting on such claims. 

Interest at a rate equal to 90% of the simple arithmetic 
mean of accepted weekly three-month Treasury bill tender 
rates for the month immediately preceding the month in 
respect of which interest may be allowed, is credited to the 
account and charged to interest on public debt. 



Halifax 1917 explosion pension account 

This account was established to provide for the continuation 
of pensions, grants and allowances following the dissolution of 
the Halifax Relief Commission. 



Investors' indemnity fund 

Section 48 of the Financial Administration Act provides for 
this account, and for the crediting thereto of the sum of 
$25,000, such further amounts as are appropriated by Parlia- 
ment for the purposes of this Section, and any recovery of 
losses referred to in Section 49 of the Act. 

Section 49 states that the Minister may, in accordance with 
and subject to regulations, pay out of the account, any losses 
sustained by subscribers for Government securities, who have 
paid all or part of the purchase price but have not received the 
ecurity or repayment of the amount so paid, and losses 
iustained by any person in the redemption of securities. 



War claims fund — World War II 

This account records moneys received from the Custodian of 
Enemy Property or from other sources, and payments: (a) to 
eligible claimants for compensation in respect of World War 
II; (b) of a supplementary award amounting to 50% of the 
original award (PC 1958-1467, October 23, 1958); and, (c) of 
expenses incurred in investigating and reporting on claims. 

A War Claims Commission was established to enquire into 
and report on claims made by Canadians arising out of World 
War II for which compensation may be paid from this or any 
other fund established for the purpose. The expenses of the 
Commission are chargeable hereto. During the year, interest 
was credited to the account and charged to interest on public 
debt. 



Sino-Canadian audit management training 

This account was established to administer funds on behalf 
of the Audit Agency of the People's Republic of China. The 
funds represent a contribution from the Canadian Internation- 
al Development Agency to the Audit Agency of the People's 
Republic of China for the purpose of developing an audit 
training program. 

Great Lakes Fishery Commission — Lamprey research and 
control 

This account was created to record funds received from the 
Great Lakes Fishery Commission, covering control and 
research work in respect to lampreys in the Great Lakes, 
carried out by the department on behalf of the Commission, on 
a contract basis. 

Guarantee deposits — Fisheries and Oceans 

This account was created to record amounts deposited with 
the department, to ensure compliance with terms and condi- 
tions of the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act. 

Miscellaneous projects' deposits — Fisheries and Oceans 

These funds, which are for the furtherance of research work, 
are comprised of contributions from organizations and 
individuals. 

Guarantee deposits — Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment 

In this account are recorded cash deposits and securities 
deposited with the department as guarantees under the Arctic 
Water Pollution Prevention Act, and guarantees for oil, miner- 
al and timber rights and licences. Interest is not allowed on 
cash deposits. 

Cash deposits totalled $273,870 and cash disbursements 
were $238,641. Securities deposited with the Department of 
Supply and Services totalled $129,172,827 and securities 
released totalled $90,837,933. 

Fines — Indian Act 

Fines collected under the Indian Act, in connection with 
liquor prosecutions, are credited to this account. Expenditures 
cover certain costs incurred in the suppression of the liquor 
traffic among the Indians of Canada. 

Guarantee deposits — Reserve resources 

This account records cash and bond security deposits with 
respect to Indian reserve licences and contracts for the de- 
velopment of resources, pursuant to the provisions of the 
Indian Act. During the year, interest was credited to the 
account and charged to interest on public debt. 



Guarantee deposits — Rotating herds 

This account records guarantee deposits given by Indians 
who sign herd agreements under the rotating herd program 
operated by the department. During the year, interest was 
credited to the account and charged to interest on public debt. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



8'17 



Indian agencies revenue trust bank accounts 

This account records moneys held in trust for Indians in 
authorized banks across Canada. These moneys include such 
items as savings, pensions, deposits on leases, community 
enterprise funds and funds for community projects of various 
kinds. 

Indian band funds 

The Indian band funds represent moneys belonging to 
Indian bands throughout Canada. During the year, interest 
was credited to the account and charged to interest on public 
debt. 

Details for this account are provided in the applicable 
departmental section of Volume II. 

Indian band funds — Shares and certiHcates 

This account records the historical value of Transalto Utili- 
ties Ltd (formerly Calgary Power Limited) shares of stock as 
compensation for a power line right-of-way on the Blood 
Indian reserve. 

Indian compensation funds 

Moneys received from the sale of Indian lands and easement 
compensation, where the title has not been cleared nor the land 
survey completed, are recorded in this account pending com- 
pletion of documentation. 

During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Indian estate accounts 

Accounts were established to record the estates of deceased 
Indians, minor Indian children who have guardians, or mental- 
ly incompetent Indians. During the year, interest was credited 
to the accounts and charged to interest on public debt. 

Land assurance fund 

This fund was created to indemnify title holders who suffer 
loss through misdescriptions in titles, and from other causes 
specified in the Land Titles Act. Fees are collected from the 
parties who register deeds with the Registrar of Land Titles in 
the Northwest Territories and the Yukon Territory. Interest is 
added to the fund annually, the present rate being 3% per 
annum. During the year, interest was credited to the account 
and charged to interest on public debt. There has been no 
claim for compensation in recent years. 

Indian contributions to the subsidy housing program 

This account records amounts dejwsited by Indians with the 
department, to ensure compliance with terms and conditions of 
the subsidy housing program carried out by the social pro- 
grams division of the department. 

Indian moneys suspense account 

In this account are recorded moneys held for individuals and 
bands, received from rentals and leases of Indian lands, such 
as agricultural leases, easements, oil and gas leases and per- 
mits, etc, pending proper documentation by the department. 

During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 



Indian savings accounts 

Savings accounts are maintained for individual Indians. 
During the year, interest was credited to the accounts and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Indian special accounts 

Indian special accounts represent a number of non-interest 
bearing accounts which are maintained for specific purposes 
and include the following: 

(fl) Absent or missing heirs — Assets in an estate to which a 
missing heir might be entitled are held in this account 
for a period of seven years, after which time, if the heirs 
are not located, the assets are distributed to other 
persons according to entitlement. 

{b) Abitibi fur preserve — This account records moneys 
received from the sale of pelts trapped on reserves in 
the Abitibi District in Quebec, to defer charges for 
tallymen's wages, freight costs, etc. 

(c) Abitibi fishery — This account records charges for the 
operation of the Abitibi sturgeon fish catching project. 

(t/) Indian off- reserve housing — This account records per- 
sonal contributions held in trust until paid to the 
vendor, the builder or legal representative. 

Federal Court special account 

This account records moneys paid into the Federal Court of 
Canada, pursuant to an order of the Court, rules of the Court 
or statutes, to be held in trust pending payment of such 
moneys, in accordance with a judgment of the Court. 

During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Fair wages suspense account 

This account is operated under the authority of the Fair 
Wages and Hours of Labour Act, and related regulations. 
Where an investigation by officials of the department in 
respect of a contract on Government works results in an award 
of wages, the amount received from the contractor is credited 
to this account, and is subsequently distributed to employees. 

The account also records amounts received from depart- 
ments, representing wages in respect of contracts, withheld 
from final payment to contractors. 

Labour Standards suspense account 

This account is operated under the authority of the Canada 
Labour Code, Part III, Section 65, and the Canada Labour 
Standards, Regulation 23. 

The account records: 

(a) funds received from employers as a result of assess- 
ments made by inspectors regarding underpayments of 
minimum wages, overtime, vacation pay, holiday pay, 
termination, severance or bereavement pay. The assess- 
ments are payable either directly to the employee, or to 
the Minister of Labour who is required to transmit the 
payment to the employee; 

{b) payments received from employers who are in arrears 
in paying their employees. Such amounts are repaid to 
employees; and, 

(c) wages received by the Minister of Labour from employ- 
ers who cannot locate employees. Efforts are then made 
by the department to locate employees. 



8-18 

Estates — Armed services 

To this account are credited the service estates of deceased 
members of the Canadian Forces. Net assets of estates are 
distributed to legal heirs under the administration of the Judge 
Advocate General, in his capacity as Director of Estates. 

Foreign governments 

These accounts are maintained to record funds received 
from foreign governments, to cover expenditures to be made on 
their behalf, in accordance with provisions of agreements with 
the Government of Canada. 

The debit balance in the account for the Federal Republic of 
Germany (German Army — Other activities) results from 
funds required to cover costs incurred in 1984-85 which were 
received only after the end of the year. 

Provinces of Canada 

This account is maintained to record funds received from 
provincial governments, for expenditures to be made on their 
behalf. 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) 

These accounts are maintained to record funds received 
from NATO to cover (a) NATO infrastructure projects imple- 
mented by Canada, and, (b) other expenditures to be made on 
NATO's behalf, in accordance with the terms of an agreement 
with the Government of Canada. 

Non-government agencies 

This account is maintained to record funds received for 
expenditures made on behalf of non-government agencies, for 
which specific accounts have not been established. 

Herbert Lott naval trust fund 

Credits to this account represent the Canadian naval portion 
of the Herbert Lott naval trust fund, which is administered by 
the British Admiralty. These funds are allocated to active or 
reserve force units which show marked efficiency in fighting 
practices, or contribute in signal degree to the improvement of 
the fighting appliances of naval or maritime forces. 

Health insurance supplementary account 

This account was established for payments in respect of 
persons who, through no fault of their own, have lost or been 
unable to obtain coverage for the insured health services under 
the Canada Health Act, and in accordance with Federal-Pro- 
vincial Agreement on Eligibility and Portability. Contributions 
are made by all provinces to the account in proportion to 
population, and are matched by the federal Government. 

Inuvik General Hospital 

This account was established to record transactions relating 
to a donation by the Lions Club for the purchase of items for 
Ward 300 at the Inuvik General Hospital. 

Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital 

This account was established to record transactions relating 
to a donation made by the Hospital for Sick Children Founda- 
tion, to be used to finance a paediatric play program and 
volunteer service at Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital. 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

World Health Organization 

This account records the funds received from the World 
Health Organization, for scientific projects. 

Donations and bequests 

This account records a bequest of $75,000 made by an 
anonymous donor, to establish a fund for research in the fields 
of dyskinesia and torticollis. 

During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Guarantee deposits — Customs and Excise 

Cash and securities are collected by the department to 
guarantee payment of customs duties and excise taxes on 
imported goods, and sales and excise taxes payable by 
licensees. 

During the year, receipts and other credits consisted of 
bonds, $2,413,000; and, cash, $56,497. Payments and other 
charges consisted of bonds, $2,379,400; and, cash, $102,619. 

Temporary deposits received from importers 

In this account are recorded temporary deposits in chartered 
bank accounts, received as security for the temporary entry of 
goods, or to otherwise ensure compliance with various depart- 
mental regulations. 

Candidates' election deposits 

This account records candidates' election deposits, received 
in respect of general elections and by-elections, less amounts 
refunded to candidates, or transferred to non-tax revenue, 
pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Elections Act. 
During the year, $5,200 was transferred to non-tax revenue. 

Harbourfront capital account 

Funds are received from and held for Harbourfront Corpo- 
ration regarding moneys derived from the capitalized leasing, 
sale or resale of lands or development rights. 

Fairs, shows and seminars 

In this account are recorded moneys deposited by companies 
to cover various expenses incurred at fairs, shows and semi- 
nars. The department disburses the moneys on behalf of 
depositors. 

Donation trust fund 

This account records moneys, securities or other property 
received by way of gift, bequest or otherwise as approved by 
the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. The 
account is charged with payments and with the disposal of 
such moneys, securities or other property, subject to the terms 
upon which such moneys are given, bequeathed or otherwise 
made available to the Council, and subject to the approval of 
the Council. 

Promotion of ofRcial languages 

This account has been established to provide members of the 
private sector with language instruction using federal Govern- 
ment facilities and Public Service Commission instructors. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

Advance payments from the private sector are credited to 
the account, and charges by the Public Service Commission for 
its services are charged thereto. 

Inmates' trust fund 

This account is credited with moneys received from inmates 
at the time of incarceration, net earnings of inmates from 
employment inside institutions, moneys received for inmates 
while in custody, moneys received from sales of hobbycraft, 
money earned through work while on day parole, and interest. 
Payments to assist in the reformation and rehabilitation of 
inmates are charged to this account. 

Benefit fund 

Moneys received by personnel of the Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police, in connection with the performance of duties, 
over and above their pay and allowances, are deposited in the 
fund, and benefits are payable therefrom. During the year, 
interest was credited to the account and charged to interest on 
public debt. In addition to the balance in the fund of 
$1,798,024, there was an amount of $74,907 outstanding in 
loans issued from the fund to members. 

Interest on bonds — Insurance companies 

This account is credited with the proceeds from interest 
coupons on bonds deposited by insurance companies under the 
Canadian and British Insurance Companies Act. Debits repre- 
sent the payment of the same interest to the insurance 
companies. 

Military purchases excess funds deposit 

This account records temporarily unutilized funds paid to 
the United States Government under contracts for purchases 
of military equipment. The funds are invested by the Federal 
Reserve Bank of New York to earn interest for the Govern- 
ment of Canada. 

Petro-Canada Enterprises Inc — Unclaimed shares 

This account records the liability to shareholders who have 
not presented their shares for payment. The closing balance 
represents the dollar value of 48,961 shares of Petro-Canada 
Enterprises Inc at $120.14 per share. 

Statistics Canada — Advance payments 

This account records advance payments received from Gov- 
ernment departments, agencies and others to finance the cost 
of special statistical services. 

Contractors' security deposits 

This account records contractors' securities that are 
required, for the satisfactory performance of work. 

Maritime pollution claims fund 

This account was established to record levy tonnage pay- 
ments for oil carried by ships in Canadian waters. The pay- 
ment of the levy was revoked effective September 1 , 1 976. 

Maritime pollution claims, the fee of the Fund Administra- 
tor, and related oil pollution control expenses, are to be 
financed out of the fund. 



8*19 
Unclaimed moneys due to Canadian seamen 

Unpaid wages of deceased members of ships' crews, as well 
as any cash on their person at time of death, are credited to 
this account pending direction as to payees. 

National Lottery account 

This account records the net revenues of Loto Canada Inc, 
not yet distributed. 

The Corporation was authorized to be wound-up, pursuant 
to the Sports Pool and Loto Canada Winding-Up Act, passed 
by the House of Commons on June 14, 1985, which received 
Royal Assent on June 20, 1985. During the process of dissolu- 
tion, proceeds of $16,586,879 were paid to this account. 

Administered trust accounts 

These accounts are under the jurisdiction of the Canadian 
Pension Commission and Veterans Services. Moneys held in 
these accounts include: (a) pensions placed under the adminis- 
tration of the Canadian Pension Commission; {b) war service 
gratuities paid under the War Service Grants Act and held by 
the department, for administration, or for veterans whose 
whereabouts are unknown; and, (c) war veterans and civilian 
war allowances and assistance fund payments placed under the 
administration of the department. 

Army benevolent fund 

This account is credited with certain canteen profits and 
other funds and, semi-annually, with interest at the rate of 
10.8% per annum from June 29, 1980 to June 28, 1985, on the 
minimum monthly balances to the credit of the fund. 

Payments are made out of the fund to or for the benefit of 
veterans or their dependants or the widows, children or other 
dependants of deceased veterans. 

During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Canadian Forces personnel assistance fund 

This fund was established to provide financial assistance to 
serving or former members of the Canadian Forces, who 
enlisted on or after February 1, 1968, and to their dependants, 
when warranted by distress or other qualifying circumstances. 
During the year, interest was credited to the account and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Estates fund 

The proceeds of the service estates of deceased members of 
the Armed Forces, who died while receiving hospital treatment 
or institutional care under the control or direction of the 
department, are credited to this fund, in which individual 
accounts are maintained and from which payments are made 
to beneficiaries, on departmental authorization. 

Ste-Anne's Hospital 

This account records moneys deposited for safekeeping by 
patients in the veterans' hospital in Ste-Anne de Bellevue, 
Quebec. Interest is calculated monthly on the minimum bal- 
ance at rates published by the Minister of Finance, and is 
credited quarterly to the account. 



8-20 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Veterans administration and welfare trust fund 

Moneys held in this account include: (a) donations, legacies, 
gifts, bequests, etc, received by the department, to be dis- 
bursed for the benefit of veterans or their dependants under 
certain conditions, and for the benefit of patients in depart- 
mental institutions; (b) donations, legacies, gifts, bequests, etc, 
received by the Canadian Pension Commission, to be disbursed 
for the use of pensioners or dependants in distressed 
circumstances. 

Veterans care trust accounts 

PC 1962-1401 of October 4, 1962, as amended, includes the 
regulations respecting veterans care cases, and provides that 
domiciliary care and treatment required while receiving 
domiciliary care be given to a veteran who agrees to pay the 
charges determined by the Minister, not in excess of $120 a 
month, and who undertakes that if the Minister so directs, he 
will assign or pay to the department any or all of his income 
and resources, to be administered in the manner prescribed. 
Moneys held in this account also include: (a) war service 
gratuities (World War I) held by the department for mental, 
tubercular and other long-term treatment cases; and, (b) war 
service gratuities paid under the War Service Grants Act, and 
held by the department for veterans while under treatment. 

Provincial sales tax — National Library 

This account is provided for the recording of provincial sales 
tax collected on behalf of provincial governments, in connec- 
tion with the sale of microfilm and reproductions. 

Provincial sales tax — Public Archives 

This account is provided for the recording of provincial sales 
tax collected on behalf of provincial governments, in connec- 
tion with the sale of microfilm and reproductions. 

Provincial sales tax — Correctional Service 

This account is credited with provincial sales tax on sales 
made by the Correctional Service of Canada, less the commis- 
sion allowed to vendors, and is charged with payments to 
provinces. 

The debit balance in the account results from taxes remitted 
at time of sale and in advance of being reported as collected. 

Provincial sales tax — Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

This account is credited with provincial sales tax on sales 
made by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and is charged 
with payments to provinces. 

The debit balance results from overpayments of sales tax to 
the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. These amounts were 
recovered in 1985-86. 

Instalments (payroll deductions) made by employees in the 
purchase of Canada savings bonds 

These accounts were established to record instalment pur- 
chases of Canada savings bonds by employees of the Govern- 
ment of Canada, certain Government agencies, defence ser- 
vices personnel and Royal Canadian Mounted Police 
personnel, by deductions from pay and allowances where 
applicable. 



Canadian Dairy Commission account 

The Canadian Dairy Commission is a Crown corporation 
listed in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration 
Act, and uses the Consolidated Revenue Fund for banking 
purposes. This account was established to record the Govern- 
ment's liability to the Commission. 

The account is credited with: (a) moneys received by the 
Commission from its operations; (b) licence fees, levies and 
charges paid to the Commission; (c) loans made to the Com- 
mission by the Minister of Finance pursuant to Section 16 of 
the Canadian Dairy Commission Act; and, (d) amounts paid 
to the Commission by the Agricultural Stabilization Board 
under the Agricultural Stabilization Act for the purpose of 
stabilizing the price of any dairy product. Payments and other 
charges represent: (a) expenditures under the Act except those 
to be paid pursuant to Section 14; and, {b) amounts paid to the 
Minister of Finance pursuant to Section 16 of the Canadian 
Dairy Commission Act or as interest on any such loans. 

Loans made to the Commission, pursuant to Section 16 of 
the Canadian Dairy Commission Act, are recorded as contra 
items under loans, investments and advances — Crown corpora- 
tions (Section 7 of this volume). 

Crown corporations' surplus moneys 

Crown corporations are authorized to deposit in the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund, with the approval of the appropriate 
Minister and the Minister of Finance, that portion of their 
cash which is temporarily in excess of their current require- 
ments. Such deposits are to earn interest at rates fixed by 
Order in Council PC 1967-914 dated May 11, 1967. 

Canada Post Corporation account 

The Canada Post Corporation is a Crown corporation listed 
in Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act, 
and uses the Consolidated Revenue Fund for banking pur- 
poses. This account was established to record the Govern- 
ment's liability to the Corporation. 

Royal Canadian Mint account 

The Royal Canadian Mint is a Crown corporation listed in 
Part I of Schedule C of the Financial Administration Act, and 
uses the Consolidated Revenue Fund for banking purposes. 
This account was established to record the Government's 
liability to the Mint. 

Canadian National (West Indies) Steamships Ltd 

This account records a deposit by the Canadian National 
(West Indies) Steamships Ltd, covering a transfer of funds to 
be held pending the wind-up of the Corporation. The Corpora- 
tion was authorized to be dissolved pursuant to the Crown 
Corporations Dissolution Authorization Act, passed by the 
House of Commons on September 11, 1985. 

Fees paid in advance — Importation of foreign cattle 

Deposits made in connection with the importation of foreign 
cattle, pregnancy tests on cattle, and applications for the 
registration of feeds, fertilizers and pesticides, are credited to 
this account pending assessment of actual costs on completion 
of the particular services required. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



8'21 



On final accountability and at such time as the services are 
completed, the deposits are either credited to non-tax revenue, 
or are returned to the depositor. 

Importation of Dutch bulbs 

This account records deposits made in connection with the 
importation of Dutch bulbs. The inspections are made in 
Holland before the bulbs are containerized. When the inspec- 
tions are completed, the actual fees are credited to non-tax 
revenue, with any excess returned to depositors. 

Federal Court fees 

This account records fees collected under Section 57 of the 
Federal Court Act. 

Shared-cost projects 

This account records the receipt, in advance, of moneys 
from federal Government departments and others, for their 
share of certain shared-cost projects. 

Trust fund — National Research Council 

This account is maintained to record funds received from 
other governments and organizations, to cover expenditures 
made on their behalf. 

Trust account — National Museums of Canada 

This account is credited with moneys received by the Corpo- 
ration, by way of gift, bequest or otherwise, interest on securi- 
ties, rent or sales of any real property acquired by the Corpo- 
ration by way of gift, bequest or otherwise, and an amount 
representing interest on the balance from time to time to the 
credit of the account. The account is to be charged with such 
amounts as are authorized by the Board of Trustees of the 
Corporation to be expended for the purpose for which such 
moneys or property were given, bequeathed or otherwise made 
available to the Corporation. Securities in connection with this 
account amount to $2,000 consisting of two Canada savings 
bonds bequeathed by the late J Dazell McKee and the late 
Hugh de T Glazebrook. Interest on these securities in the 
amount of $75 was credited to the account during the year and 
charged to interest on public debt. 

Special operating account — National Library 

This account records moneys received for the purpose of the 
National Library, by way of donation, bequest or otherwise. 
Amounts required for the purposes of the National Library 
Act may be paid out of this account, or out of money appro- 
priated by Parliament for such purposes. 

Special fund — National Research Council 

This- account was credited with revenue of the National 
Research Council of Canada derived from laboratory fees, 
$8,175,699; capital, $104,908; information services, 
$1,982,645; sale of publications, $2,110,640; and, miscellane- 
ous receipts, $156,230, under authority of the National 
Research Council Act. An amount of $10,529,375 was 
charged hereto, of which an amount of $6,657,129 was credit- 
ed to National Research Council Vote 5, $104,908 to National 



Research Council Vote 10, and, $3,767,338 to National 
Research Council Vote 20, to offset expenditures. 

Trust fund — Natural Sciences and Engineering Research 
Council 

This account is maintained to record funds received from 
other governments and organizations, to cover expenditures 
made on their behalf, and to record this agency's liability to 
other organizations. 

Queen's Fellowship fund — Social Sciences and Humanities 
Research Council 

This fund is an endowment of $250,000 that was established 
by a special appropriation in 1973-74. This amount was invest- 
ed in bonds of Abitibi Paper Ltd, at 10.5% interest per annum, 
payable semi-annually, due March 1, 1995. On March 1, 
1985, the fund redeemed its investment in bonds of Abitibi 
Paper Ltd. The income is used for the payment of scholarships 
to graduate students in certain fields of Canadian studies. 

Interest at a rate equal to 90% of the simple arithmetic 
mean of accepted weekly three-month Treasury bill tender 
rates for the month immediately preceding the month in 
respect of which interest may be allowed, is credited to the 
account and charged to interest on public debt. 

Trust fund — Social Sciences and Humanities Research 
Council 

This account was established to receive and disburse funds 
made available for its social sciences and humanities research 
activities. The account is also used for receipts of private 
donations and disbursements of these funds for the purpose of 
special projects. 

Veterans' Land Act trust account general 

Receipts and other credits to this account consist mainly of 
initial and excess payments by veterans and civilian purchas- 
ers, as provided under the Act, which are held pending approv- 
al of sales. Other items included are veterans' sales proceeds 
held pending redisbursement on their present or second estab- 
lishment, insurance fire loss proceeds to pay for restoration of 
fire damage, and moneys sent in by veterans and civilian 
purchasers, to be held for payment of taxes and insurance, and 
other related items. 

Mackenzie King trust account 

The late The Right Hon W L Mackenzie King bequeathed 
Laurier House, Ottawa, and the sum of $225,000, to the 
Government of Canada. The amount of $225,000 was credited 
to the account. Interest computed, in accordance with the 
terms of the Laurier House Act, is credited to the account at 
the end of each year, and is charged to interest on public debt. 
The interest is to be used to assist in the maintenance of the 
Laurier House, which is to be preserved as a place of historic 
interest, and also to provide accommodation for study and 
research. Expenditures are to be made by the Dominion 
Archivist, subject to the approval of the Governor in Council. 



8-22 

During the year, interest of $28,687 was credited hereto. In 
accordance with the Act, the Dominion Archivist is authorized 
to expend an annual sum not to exceed 70% of the interest 
earned in the previous year for the maintenance and upkeep of 
the buildings on the Laurier House property, as well as an 
annual sum not to exceed 30% of the interest earned for the 
maintenance of the Laurier House as a museum and study 
centre, and for the provision of sundry purchases therefrom, 
and the unspent balance of the interest earned be credited at 
the end of the year to non-tax revenue. 

Custodian administration account 

This account was established to record assets transferred 
from the Custodian of Enemy Property. This special purpose 
money is to be used to satisfy claims against, or expenses of, 
the Custodian. 

Federal sales tax — Correctional Service 

This account is credited with federal sales tax on sales made 
by the Correctional Service of Canada, and is charged with 
remittances to National Revenue, Customs and Excise. 

The debit balance in the account results from taxes remitted 
at time of sale and in advance of being reported as collected. 

Provincial Tax Collection Agreements 
Account 

This account records income taxes collected by the Govern- 
ment of Canada on behalf of provinces and territories par- 
ticipating in the joint-collection provision of the Federal-Pro- 



PVBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

vincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, and related payments made 
to them. 

Under the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, the 
Government of Canada is empowered to enter into agreements 
with provincial and territorial governments, to collect income 
taxes on their behalf, and to make payments to them with 
respect to such taxes. 

The Government of Canada entered into agreements with 
provinces and territories (Quebec excepted), to collect 
individual income tax, and with provinces and territories 
(Alberta, Ontario and Quebec excepted), to collect corporation 
income tax, and, to pay in equal monthly instalments to such 
provinces and territories, the estimated revenue to be produced 
by the respective provincial and territorial taxes. 

At the beginning of each year, the Minister of Finance 
estimates the amount of the payments, for the taxation year 
ending in that year, to provinces and territories that have 
entered into agreements. These estimates are adjusted to 
actual amounts at a later date. Adjustments are to be made 
not later than March 31 of the year following that in which 
the taxation year ends. 

Other Specified Purpose Accounts 

There are a number of other specified purpose accounts 
operated by the Government, such as the Public Service death 
benefit account, the crop reinsurance fund, the regular forces 
death benefit account and the veterans' insurance fund. 

Table 8.13 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for all other specified purpose accounts. 



TABLE 8.13 

OTHER SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



Receipts and Payments and 
April 1/1984 other credits other charges March 31/1985 1985 



Agriculture — 

Crop reinsurance fund 149,642,625 

Employment and Immigration — 

Annuities agents' pension account 54,725 

Finance — 

Insurance — Civil service insurance fund 16,162,992 

Fisheries and Oceans — 

Fishing vessel insurance plan 5,832,929 

National Defence — 

Regular forces death benefit account 52,718,017 

Parliament — 

Members of Parliament retiring allowances account 20,588,216 

Solicitor General — 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — Dependants' 

pension fund 12,794,271 

Treasury Board — 

Locally-engaged contributory pension account 1 ,080,409 

Public Service death benefit account 212,917,567 

Retirement fund 5,303 

214.003,279 
Veterans Affairs — 

Returned soldiers' insurance fund 1,674,630 

Veterans' insurance fund 25,070,439 

26,745.069 

Total 498,542,123 



1984 



$ 


$ 


$ 


S 


$ 


20,418,789 


520 


170,060,894 


20,418,269 


17,125,969 


11,750 


18,674 


47,801 


- 6.924 


- 6,656 


332,018 


701,827 


15,793,183 


- 369,809 


- 445,732 


8,208,972 


9,563,468 


4,478,433 


- 1,354,496 


-1,417,242 


14,541,237 


8,523,178 


58,736,076 


6,018,059 


5.778,051 


6;3 10,688 


4,548,214 


22,350,690 


1,762,474 


2,516,923 


1,411,649 


441,561 


13,764,359 


970,088 


793,955 


424,747 
79,722,811 

80.147,558 


162,196 
31,466,550 

31,628,746 


1,342,960 

261,173,828 

5,303 

262,522,091 


262,551 
48,256,261 

48,518,812 


245,936 
38,570,236 

38.816,172 


30,845 
1,047,826 
1.078.671 


255,846 
1,575,962 
1,831,808 


1,449,629 
24,542,303 
25,991,932 


- 225,001 
-528,136 

- 753,137 


-317,221 

- 759,520 

- 1,076,741 


132,461,332 


57,257,996 


573,745,459 


75,203,336 


62,084,699 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE A CCOUNTS 

Crop reinsurance fund 

This fund, established by Section 5(1) of the Crop Insurance 
Act, provides insurance to participating provinces for costs 
they incur in operating various crop insurance schemes. 

This account is credited with moneys paid by the provinces 
for the purpose of reinsurance, and is charged with moneys 
paid to the provinces under the terms of reinsurance 
agreements. 

Annuities agents' pension account 

This pension plan provides pension benefits to former eli- 
gible Government employees who were engaged in selling 
Government annuities to the public. During the year, interest 
of $1,804, calculated at the rate of 4% per annum, was 
credited to the account and charged to interest on public debt. 
Contributions from the Annuities Branch, as former employer, 
amounted to $9,946. 

Civil service insurance fund 

This fund was established by the Civil Service Insurance 
Act, to provide life insurance coverage for civil servants who 
bought policies before 1955-56. The purchase of policies was 
discontinued in 1954-55, pursuant to Section 51(2) of the 
Public Service Superannuation Act. 

During the year, receipts and other credits consisted of 
premiums, $25,423; and, an amount of $306,595 (charged to 
budgetary expenditure) representing an adjustment to bring 
the balance in the fund into agreement with the actuarial 
valuation as at March 31, 1984. Payments and other charges 
consisted of death benefits, $567,915; cash surrender value, 
$76,958; annuities, $56,634; and, premium refunds, $321. 

Fishing vessel insurance plan 

The fishing vessel insurance plan is administered in accord- 
ance with regulations of the Governor in Council, to insure 
fishermen against abnormal capital losses. The account is 
credited with premiums and recoveries, and with advances in 
accordance with the regulations, such advances not at any time 
to exceed $150,000. The account is charged with refunds of 
premiums and payments in settlement of third party vessel 
collision damage claims against fishermen, where the collision 
involves a vessel insured under the fishing vessel insurance 
plan. Administration costs are paid from Department of Fish- 
eries and Oceans Vote 1 . 

Regular forces death benefit account 

This account was established by the Canadian Forces Super- 
annuation Act, to provide life insurance to contributing mem- 
bers of the Armed Forces. Receipts and other credits consist 
of: (a) contributions by participants; (6) Government's contri- 
bution (1/6 of benefits paid in respect of participants who, at 
the time of death, were members of the regular forces, or who 
were elective regular forces participants, to whom pensions 
were payable under the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act 
or the Defence Services Pension Continuation Act); (c) single 
premiums payable by the Government in respect of regular 
forces participants who become entitled to a basic benefit of 
$500 without contribution; and, (^) interest. 



8*23 

Payments and other charges consist of: {a) benefits paid in 
respect of participants who, at the time of death, were mem- 
bers of the regular forces, or who were elective regular forces 
participants, to whom pensions were payable under the 
Canadian Forces Superannuation Act or the Defence Services 
Pension Continuation Act, upon their retirement from the 
regular forces; {b) benefits paid in respect of elective regular 
forces participants, to whom pensions were not payable under 
the Canadian Forces Superannuation Act or the Defence 
Services Pension Continuation Act, upon their retirement from 
the regular forces; and, (c) the portion of benefit payable for 
which a single premium has been paid by the Government. 



TABLE 8.14 

REGULAR FORCES DEATH BENEFIT ACCOUNT 



Opening balance 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 

Contributions by participants 

Government's contribution 

Single premiums payable by the Govern- 
ment in respect of regular forces partici- 
pants who become entitled to a basic 
benefit of $500 without contribution 

Interest 



PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 
Benefits paid in respect of participants who, 
at the time of death, were members of the 
regular forces, or who were elective regu- 
lar forces participants, to whom pensions 
were payable under the Canadian Forces 
Superannuation Act or the Defence Ser- 
vices Pension Continuation Act 

Closing balance 58,736,076 



1984-85 


1983-84 


$ 


S 


52,718,017 


46,939,966 


6,891,748 
1,419,523 


6,471,625 
1,220,547 


415,400 

5,814,566 

14.541.237 


372,310 

5,039,851 

13.104,333 


67,259,254 


60,044.299 



8,523,178 



7,326,282 



52,718,017 



Members of Parliament retiring allowances account 

This account was established by the Members of Parliament 
Retiring Allowances Act, to provide pension benefits to eli- 
gible Members of Parliament who contributed to the plan. 
"Member" means a member of the Senate or House of 
Commons. Benefits are also available to widows and depend- 
ent children of members who served on or after April 9, 1963 
and contributed under the Act. 

Receipts and other credits consist of: (a) contributions 
reserved from current indemnities, based on the full amount 
paid; (b) contributions reserved from additional salaries, based 
on the percentage of contribution elected, up to 1 0% of the full 
amount of salary; (c) contributions for previous sessions, where 
members elect to pay arrears, and interest on the arrears; (d) 
interest and mortality insurance on any unpaid balance, based 
on Canada Life Tables; (e) contributions by the Government, 
of an amount equal to contributions paid or which have 
become payable in the year; (/) interest credited quarterly; 
and, (g) the repayment of pensions after elections to transfer 
Members of Parliament retiring allowances to the Public 
Service Superannuation Account. 



8*24 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Payments and other charges consist of: (a) payments of 
annual allowances; (b) withdrawal allowances and related 
interest; (c) refunds of contributions which are in excess of the 
maximum required; and, (d) transfers of funds to the Public 
Service Superannuation Account. 

TABLE 8.15 

MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT RETIRING ALLOW- 
ANCES ACCOUNT 



TABLE 8.16 

PUBLIC SERVICE DEATH BENEFIT ACCOUNT 



1984-85 



1983-84 



22,994,821 

2,297,415 

39,842 

2,143 

39,842 

27,363 

2.406.605 



Opening balance 20,588,216 18,071,293 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 
Members' contributions — 

Current 1,635.174 1,540,071 

Arrears of principal, interest and mortal- 
ity insurance 390,709 258,758 

Government contributions — 

Current 1,610,411 1,540,071 

Interest 2,312,087 1,584,628 

Adjustment to 1983-84 annual allowances 

and Government contributions 362,307 

6.310.688 4.923.528 

26,898,904 

PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Annual allowances 3,239,536 

Withdrawal allowances 1,202,936 

Interest on withdrawals 58,773 

Refund of elective service contributions 46,969 

Transfer to other pension plans 

4.548.214 

Closing balance 22,350,690 20,588,216 



Dependants' pension fund 

This fund which pertains to Part IV of the Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act, provides pension 
benefits to widows and other dependants of contributing mem- 
bers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. It is maintained 
by 5% contributions from the pay of members of the Force, 
other than commissioned officers. 

Locally-engaged contributory pension account 

This account which pertains to Part II of the Locally- 
Engaged Pension Regulations, provides pension benefits to 
locally employed Government employees who contributed to 
the plan. The account is credited with contributions from 
locally-engaged employees, and charged with payments of 
benefits. 

Public Service death beneflt account 

This account was established under the Public Service 
Superannuation Act, to provide life insurance to contributing 
members of the Public Service. 

The account is credited with: (a) contributions by 
employees; {b) contributions by the Government and Public 
Service corporations; and, (c) interest. Payments and other 
charges represent: (a) benefits paid in respect of participants 
who, at the time of death, were employed in the Public 
Service, or were in receipt of an annuity under Part I of the 
Public Service Superannuation Act; and, {b) benefits of $500 
paid in respect of participants who, at the time of death, were 
employed in the Public Service, or were in receipt of an 
annuity under Part I of the Public Service Superannuation 
Act, and on whose behalf a single premium for $500 death 
benefit coverage for life has been made. 



1984-85 



1983-84 



Opening balance 212,917,567 

RECEIPTS AND OTHER CREDITS— 
Contributions — 
Employees — 
Government and Public Service corpo- 
rations 46,641,150 

Government — 
One-sixth of benefit payments — Gen- 
eral 5,159,414 

Single premium for $500 1,679,393 

Public Service corporations 2,100,431 

Interest 24,142,423 

79.722.811 



174,347,331 



44,200,454 



5,241,499 

1,659,965 

2,017,817 

19,220,368 

72.340.103 



292,640,378 246,687,434 



PAYMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES— 

Benefit payments — 

General 30,145,362 32,460,539 

Life coverage of $500 1,271,888 1,308,228 

Other death benefit payments 49,300 1,100 

31.466,550 33.769.867 

Closing balance 261,173,828 212,917,567 



Retirement fund 

This fund provides pension benefits to certain eligible Gov- 
ernment employees who are not covered by the Public Service 
Superannuation Account and who contributed to the fund. 

Contributions are made to the fund in the form of monthly 
deductions from the salaries of certain prevailing rate or 
seasonal and certain other employees. Other credits are inter- 
est at the rate of 4% per annum on the balance to the credit of 
each contributor, the off-setting charge being to interest on 
public debt. Payments and other charges represent payment of 
the amounts to the employees' credit upon resignation or 
death, or, if they become contributors to the Public Service 
Superannuation Account, transfers to that account. 

Returned soldiers' insurance fund 

This fund was established by the Returned Soldiers' Insur- 
ance Act, to provide life insurance to contributing veterans of 
World War I. The account is credited with premiums and is 
charged with disbursements for death benefits and cash sur- 
render values. The account is actuarially maintained and an 
actuarial liability adjustment as at March 31, 1984 of $30,365 
was credited to the account during the year and was charged 
to budgetary expenditure. The final date on which application 
for this insurance could have been received, was August 31, 
1933. 

Veterans' insurance fund 

This fund was established by the Veterans' Insurance Act, 
to provide life insurance to contributing veterans of World 
War II. The account is credited with premiums and is charged 
with disbursements for death benefits and cash surrender 
values. The account is actuarially maintained and an actuarial 
liability adjustment as at March 31, 1984 of $706,522 was 
credited to the account during the year and was charged to 
budgetary expenditure. The final date on which application for 
this insurance could have been received, was October 31, 1968. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENTS 

Canada Pension Plan Account and the Canada 
Pension Plan Investment Fund 



8*25 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

THE HONOURABLE JAKE EPP, P.C, M.P. 
MINISTER OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE 

I have examined the statements of the Canada Pension Plan 
Account and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund for 
the year ended March 31, 1985. My examination was made in 
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and 
accordingly included such tests and other procedures as I 
considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In my opinion, these statements present fairly the balance 
and changes of the Account and the Fund for the year ended 
March 31, 1985 in accordance with the accounting policies set 
out in Note 2 to the statements applied on a basis consistent 
with that of the preceding year. 

KENNETH M. DYE, F.C.A. 
Auditor General of Canada 

Ottawa, Canada 
August 16, 1985 



STATEMENT OF THE CANADA PENSION PLAN 

ACCOUNT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 

(in thousands of dollars) 



Amounts credited 
Contributions — Employees, employ- 
ers and self-employed 

Interest (Note 3) 

Amounts charged 
Benefits 

Retirement pensions 

Survivors' pensions 

Disability pensions 

Orphans' benefits 

Death benefits 

Disabled contributors' child ben- 
efiu 

Expenses (Note 4) 

Collection of contributions 

Administration 

Cheque issue and computer services 

Accommodation 

Assignment of social insurance 
numbers and maintenance of 
central index 

Actuarial services 

Increase in balance 

Balance at beginning of year 

Balance at end of year 

Represented by: 
Canada Pension Plan Investment 

Fund 

Operating balance on deposit with the 

Receiver General for Canada 



1985 



1984 



3,879,487 
2,888,316 


3,715,935 
2,533,749 


6,767.803 


6,249,684 


2.762.103 

677.940 

526.983 

109.921 

85.724 

60.640 


2,383,127 

591,549 

444,205 

105,438 

78,596 

53,926 


4.223.311 


3,656,841 


45.012 

37.930 

12,542 

2.753 

1.392 
382 


45.278 

26,564 

11,549 

2,416 

2,740 

427 


100,011 


88,974 


4,323,322 


3,745,815 


2,444,481 
26,611,971 


2,503.869 
24.108.102 


29,056,452 


26.611,971 


27,554,433 
1,502,019 


25,304,708 
1,307,263 


29,056,452 


26,611,971 



Approved on behalf of the Department of National Health and Welfare: 

D. E. L. MAASLAND 
Assistant Deputy Minister 
Income Security Programs 

DAVID KIRKWOOD 
Deputy Minister 



8-26 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Canada Pension Plan Account and the Canada 
Pension Plan Investment Fund — Continued 



STATEMENT OF THE CANADA PENSION PLAN 

INVESTMENT FUND 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 

(in thousands of dollars) 





Balance at 


Amounts 






beginning 


charged — 


Balance at 




of year 


Purchases 


end of year 


Investment in securities 








(Note 5) 








Provinces 








Newfoundland 


523,032 


47,146 


570,178 


Prince Edward Island 


109,164 


10,500 


119,664 




992,529 


85,762 


1,078,291 


New Brunswick 


752,055 


67,087 


819,142 


Quebec 


104,474 


5,400 


109,874 


Ontario 


.. 13,500,528 


1,133,182 


14,633,710 


Manitoba 


1,439,398 


119,316 


1,558,714 


Saskatchewan 


1,135,827 


104,274 


1.240.101 


Alberta 


2,747,752 


305,422 


3,053,174 


British Columbia 


3,811,273 


354,975 


4,166.248 




25,116,032 


2,233,064 


27,349,096 


Canada 


188,676 


16,661 


205,337 




25,304,708 


2,249,725 


27,554,433 



Approved on behalf of the Department of National Health and Welfare: 

D. E. L. MAASLAND 
Assistant Deputy Minister 
Income Security Programs 

DAVID KIRKWOOD 
Deputy Minister 



NOTES TO STATEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 

1 . Plan description and authority 

The Canada Pension Plan (the Plan) is a compulsory 
and contributory social insurance plan which enables 
members of the labour force to acquire and retain protec- 
tion for themselves and their families against loss of 
income due to retirement, disability or death. The Plan 
applies in all parts of Canada, except for the Province of 
Quebec which has a parallel plan. 

Under existing arrangements, all benefits and all costs 
incurred in the administration of the Plan are financed by 
the contributions made by employees, employers and self- 
employed persons and the interest earned from the invest- 
ment of funds. 

The Canada Pension Plan Account (the Account) was 
established in the accounts of Canada by Section 1 10.(1) 
of the Canada Pension Plan, a 1965 Act of Parliament, to 
record the contributions, interest, benefits and expenses of 
the Plan. 

The Canada Pension Pian Investment Fund (the Fund) 
was established in the accounts of Canada by Section 
111.(1) of the Plan to record the investment in securities 
of the provinces and Canada. 



2. Accounting policies 

Canada Pension Plan Account 

The amounts credited and charged to the Account are 
in accordance with Sections 110.(2) and 110.(3) of the 
Plan, respectively. Contributions, interest and benefits are 
recorded on a cash basis. Contributions are received from 
Revenue Canada — Taxation based on estimates of collec- 
tions for the current year and adjustments to the esti- 
mates of prior years. Expenses are recorded on an accrual 
basis. The balance in the Account represents the 
accumulated excess of contributions and interest over 
benefits and expenses to date. 

Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund 

The amounts charged and credited to the Fund are in 
accordance with Section 1 1 1.(2) of the Plan. All securities 
held are carried at cost, are non-negotiable and have a 
term of 20 years or such lesser period as may be deter- 
mined by the Minister of Finance on the recommendation 
of the Chief Actuary of the Department of Insurance. 



3. Interest 



Interest on investment in securi- 
ties held by the Fund. The 
weighted average rate of in- 
terest on securities purchased 
during the year was 13.00% 
(1984—11.60%) 
Provinces 

Newfoundland 

Prince Edward Island 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

Canada 

Interest on operating balance on 
deposit with the Receiver Gen- 
eral for Canada, at a weighted 
average rate of 1 1.02% (1984— 

9.25%) 



1985 



1984 



(in thousands of dollars) 



57,236 


50,705 


12,095 


10,653 


108,232 


95,387 


81,421 


72,198 


10,415 


9,675 


1,445.581 


1.289.928 


154.092 


137,706 


123.036 


108,797 


308.251 


261,893 


416.016 


367,349 



2,716,375 
20,439 



2,404,291 
18,311 



2,736,814 



151,502 



2,422,602 



111.147 



2,888.316 2,533.749 



Expenses 

Expenses of the Account represent the costs of adminis- 
tration charged by six federal government departments: 
Revenue Canada — Taxation (collection of contributions); 
Health and Welfare (administration); Supply and Ser- 
vices (cheque issue and computer services); Public Works 
(accommodation); Employment and Immigration (assign- 
ment of social insurance numbers and maintenance of 
central index); and Insurance (actuarial services). 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



8'27 



Canada Pension Plan Account and the Canada 
Pension Plan Investment Fund — Concluded 



-Concluded 



NOTES TO STATEMENTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985- 

5. Investment in securities 

Operating balances on deposit with the Receiver Gener- 
al in excess of estimated cash requirements for the follow- 
ing three-month period are available for purchases of 
securities of the provinces and Canada. The monies avail- 
able for securities purchases are allocated to the provinces 
based on the proportion of contributions credited to the 
Account during the preceding 10 years in respect of 
employment in a given province to the total contributions 
in those years. The portion attributed to employment in 
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and cer- 
tain other employees outside Canada are invested in 
securities of Canada. 

The securities of Quebec relate to the contributions of 
certain federal employees, such as members of the 
Canadian Armed Forces, who are residents in the Prov- 
ince of Quebec. 

6. Financing of the Plan 

When the Plan was introduced, the combined employ- 
er-employee contribution rate was set at 3.6% of the 
contributory earnings with the understanding that this 
would be sufficient to meet the cost of benefits and 
administration for a certain period of time but not indefi- 
nitely. In the initial years, a fund would be built up from 
which resources would be used to purchase securities of 
the provinces and, to a much lesser extent, securities of 
Canada as described in Note 5. However, since inception 
of the Plan, it has been recognized that the 3.6% contribu- 
tion rate would need to be raised at some point in the 
future. 

The Plan is not designed to be fully funded on a private 
sector pension plan basis. However, if the Plan were to be 
fully funded, the Chief Actuary of the Department of 
Insurance estimates that an additional $215 billion would 
need to be invested at December 31, 1984 to pay future 
benefits of all contributors and pensioners in the Plan at 
that time. The estimate is based upon ultimate assump- 
tions used in the most recent actuarial report, tabled in 
the House of Commons on June 5, 1984. 

The annual cost of benefits and expenses exceeded the 
amount of annual contributions in the year ended March 
31, 1985. The actuarial report indicated that if no 
changes were made to the combined employer-employee 
contribution rate of 3.6% a gradually increasing propor- 
tion of the interest would be needed after 1985 to finance 
benefits and expenses, and no further funds, apart from 
the reinvestment of a portion of interest owed to the 
Account, would be available to the provinces as loans. The 
Account would continue to grow until 1994 when all of 
the interest would be needed to meet payments. If the 
increase in the contribution rate were delayed beyond 
1994, the balance of the Account would start to decline 
and by the year 2004, it would be exhausted. The contri- 
bution rate would have to increase to 6.1% in 2004 and 



then slowly rise to a relatively stable rate of between 10 
and 1 1% by 2030 in order to maintain benefit payments. 

Under existing legislation, any proposed enactment to 
alter the general level of benefits or the rate of contribu- 
tions requires agreement by at least two-thirds of the 10 
provinces having an aggregate of not less than two-thirds 
of the population. 

A long-term financing philosophy for the Plan which 
will include the timing and rate of increase of the contri- 
bution rate is being considered by the provinces and the 
federal government. 



8*28 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Canada Employment and Immigration 
Commission relating to the Unemployment 
Insurance Account 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

THE HONOURABLE FLORA MACDONALD, P.C, M.P. 
MINISTER OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

I have examined the balance sheet of the Canada Employ- 
ment and Immigration Commission relating to the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Account as at December 31, 1984 and the 
statement of revenue, expenses and deficit for the year then 
ended. My examination was made in accordance with general- 
ly accepted auditing standards, and accordingly included such 
tests and other procedures as I considered necessary in the 
circumstances. 



f'j%--^''-i- 



In my opinion, these financial statements present fairly the 
financial position of the Commission relating to the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Account as at December 31, 1984 and the 
results of its operations for the year then ended in accordance 
with the accounting policies set out in Note 2 to the financial 
statements applied on a basis consistent with that of the 
preceding year. 

KENNETH M. DYE, F.C.A. 
Auditor General of Canada 



Ottawa, Canada 
August 23, 1985 



BALANCE SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1984 
(in thousands of dollars) 



ASSETS 

Due from claimants (Note 4) 
Due from Canada (Note 5) 



1984 



1983 



127,004 



121,140 
87,065 



127,004 



208,205 



LIABILITIES AND DEFICIT 

Balance of the account with Receiver 

General for Canada (Note 3) 

Unredeemed warrants (Note 3) 

Tax deductions from warrants 

Due to Canada (Note 5) 

Advances from Canada (Note 6) 

Deficit 



1984 



4,672,666 
(4,545,662) 



1983 



125,811 


125,970 


165,124 


167,809 


66,199 


56,284 


167,534 




4,147,998 


3,711,716 



4,061,779 
(3,853,574) 



127,004 



208,205 



^! 



Approved by the Commission: 

PAUL GAUVIN 
Executive Director 
Finance and Administration 



GAETAN LUSSIER 
Chairman 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 



8-29 



Canada Employment and Immigration 
Commission relating to the Unemployment 
Insurance Account — Continued 



1984 


1983 


7,627,117 
11,687 


7,017,369 
9,819 


7,638,804 


7,027,188 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE, EXPENSES 
AND DEFICIT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1984 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Revenue 

Premiums 

Penalties 

Expenses 

Benefits (Note 7 and Schedule) 9,859,443 

Administration 897,946 

Interest on advances from Canada 

and on the balance of the account 

with Receiver General for Canada . . 452,9 1 7 

Doubtful accounts 10,974 

11.: 

Excess of ex()enses over revenue before 

Government's share of benefits 

Government's share of benefits 

(Schedule) 

Excess of expenses over revenue for the 

year 

Deficit at beginning of the year 

Deficit at end of the year 4,545,662 



10,062,617 
817,993 



409,315 
4,709 



11,221,280 


11,294,634 


3,582,476 
2,890,388 


4,267,446 
2,810,573 


692,088 
3,853,574 


1,456,873 
2,396,701 



3,853,574 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, 1984 

1 . Authority and objective 

The Canada Employment and Immigration Commis- 
sion, a departmental corporation named in Schedule B to 
the Financial Administration Act, administers the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Act, 1971 as amended. The objective 
of the Act is to provide short-term financial relief and 
other assistance to eligible workers. The financial transac- 
tions relating to this objective are reported through the 
Unemployment Insurance Account. 

In the accounts of Canada, the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Account was established by Section 1 3 1 of the Act. 
All amounts received under the Act are deposited in the 
Consolidated Revenue Fund and credited to this Account. 
Benefits and the cost of administration of the Act are paid 
out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund and charged to 
this Account. 

Under Part IV of the Act, the Minister of National 
Revenue is responsible for collecting premiums from 
employers and employees. 

2. Accounting policies 

(a) Premiums 

The premiums are recorded based on an estimate of 
the amount to be collected in the current year and 
include adjustments between actual and estimated 
premiums of prior years. 

(b) Penalties 

Penalties, levied pursuant to Section 47 of the Act, are 
recorded on an accrual basis. 



(c) Benefits 

Benefits represent warrants issued during the year less 
benefit overpayments identified by the Commission 
during the year and benefit repayments received and 
estimated receivable under Section 142 of the Act. 

(d) Administration 

The costs of administration of the Act are determined 
by the Unemployment Insurance Regulations and are 
charged to the Account by the Commission. 

(e) Interest 

Interest on the balance of the account with Receiver 
General for Canada and interest on advances from 
Canada are recorded on an accrual basis. 

(0 Government's share of benefits 

The Government's share of benefits is recorded on an 
accrual basis. 

3. Restatement of prior year 

The balances at December 31, 1983 of the account with 
Receiver General for Canada and the unredeemed war- 
rants established at that date at $92 million and $385.8 
million respectively were restated by $218 million to 
reflect all warrants redeemed by the Bank of Canada. 

4. Due from claimants 



1984 



1983 



(in thousands of dollars) 



Benefit overpayments and penal- 
ties 

Less: allowance for doubtful 
accounts 

Benefit repayments under Section 
142 of the Act 



88.215 
21.351 



75,459 
15.319 



66,864 
60,140 



60,140 
61,000 



127,004 



121,140 



Uncollectable benefit overpayments and penalties writ- 
ten-off during the year under authority of Section 60(2) 
of the Regulations amounted to $4.9 million (1983 — $4.8 
million). 



5. Due to (from) Canada 



Government's share of benefits 

Premiums 

Interest on balance of the account 
with Receiver General for 
Canada 

Administration expenses 

Benefit repayments 

Other 



1984 



1983 



(in thousands of dollars) 



(27.835) 
165,882 



(978) 
30,567 
(190) 
88 



(100,435) 
2.631 



(25) 
10,847 
(149) 
66 



167,534 



(87,065) 



8-30 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Canada Employment and Immigration 
Commission relating to the Unemployment 
Insurance Account — Concluded 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, \9S4-— Concluded 

6. Advances from Canada 

Advances from Canada are made under Section 137 of 
the Act and the Unemployment Insurance Account 
Advance Regulations, by means of promissory notes 
which bear annual interest compounded semi-annually at 
rates varying from 9.75% to 13.25%. The balance as at 
December 31 consists of $3,753 million ($3,328 in 1983) 
in principal and accrued interest of $395 million ($383.7 
million in 1983). Of the amount of $3,753 million in 
principal, $1,680 million is repayable in 1985 and $2,073 
million in 1986. 

7. Overpayments and underpayments of benefits 

The large number of claimants to be monitored and the 
requirement for prompt service require selective internal 
control procedures rather than universal and therefore the 
verification of claims is mainly done after claimants have 
begun to receive benefits. 

As a result, overpayments and underpayments of ben- 
efits exist which the Commission estimated at $300 mil- 
lion and $84 million respectively for the year ended 
December 31, 1984. These amounts are included in the 
benefits for the year. 

SCHEDULE OF BENEFITS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1984 

(in thousands of dollars) 





1984 


1983 




Total 


Government's 
share 


Total 


Government's 
share 


Initial 

Extended duration of 


5,572,489 

738,719 

2,738,559 

394,586 

199,078 

31,377 

18,026 

3,008 


2,738,559 


5,671,731 

949,897 

2,680,553 

341,828 

174,370 

84,940 

17,539 




Extended regional 
unemployment rate 

Maternity 

Sickness 

Work sharing 


2,680,553 


Retirement 

Adoption 




Fishing 


9,695,842 
163,601 


2,738,559 
151,829 


9,920,858 
141,759 


2,680,553 
130,020 




9,859,443 


2,890,388 


10,062,617 


2,810,573 



The benefits for the extended regional unemployment rate and 
the fishing benefits, less fishing premiums collected, are the 
sole responsibility of the Government. 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 

Government Annuities Account 



8'31 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

THE HONOURABLE FLORA MaCDONALD, P.C., M.P. 
MINISTER OF EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

I have examined the balance sheet of the Government 
Annuities Account as at March 31, 1985 and the statement of 
operations and actuarial reserves for the year then ended. My 
examination was made in accordance with generally accepted 
auditing standards, and accordingly included such tests and 
other procedures as I considered necessary in the circum- 
stances. 

In my opinion, these financial statements present fairly the 
financial position of the Account as at March 31, 1985 and the 
results of its operations for the year then ended in accordance 
with the provisions of the Government Annuities Acts and 
Regulations and generally accepted accounting principles 
applied, except for the change in determining the value of the 
actuarial reserves and surplus as explained in Note 3 to the 
financial statements, on a basis consistent with that of the 
preceding year. 

KENNETH M. DYE, F.C.A. 

Auditor General of Canada 

Ottawa, Canada 
September 16, 1985 



BALANCE SHEET AS AT MARCH 31, 1985 
(in thousands of dollars) 



ASSETS 


1985 


1984 


LIABILITIES 


1985 


1984 


Deposit with Receiver General for 


1,020,498 

74,988 

176 


1,046,824 

76,777 
184 


18 

6,015 
1,089,629 


17 


Canada 

Accrued interest due from Canada 


Actuarial surplus due to Canada 
(Note 3) 


1,139 


Accounts receivable 


Actuarial reserves (Note 4) 


1,122,629 








1,095,662 


1,123,785 


1,095,662 


1,123.785 



Approved by the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission: 

GAETAN LUSSIER 
Chairman 



PAULGAUVIN 
Executive Director 
Finance and Administration 



8-32 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Government Annuities Account — Continued 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS AND ACTUARIAL 

RESERVES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 

(in thousands of dollars) 



Income 

Interest from Canada 

Premiums 

Other 

Payments and other charges 

Annuity payments 

Premium refunds 

Unclaimed annuities 

Excess of payments and other charges 
over income for the year 

Actuarial reserves, balance at beginning 
of the year 

Actuarial surplus — Excess of recorded 
actuarial reserves over calculated 
actuarial reserves at end of the year 
(Note 3) 

Actuarial reserves, balance at end of the 
year (Note 4) 

Represented by: 
Accumulated premiums and accrued 
interest for unmatured annuities .... 
Present value of matured annuities .... 

Total actuarial reserves (Note 4) 



1985 


1984 


74,988 

770 

81 


76,777 

1,017 

61 


75,839 


77,855 


99,205 

3,404 

215 


98,274 

3,664 

387 


102,824 


102,325 


26,985 
1,122,629 


24,470 
1,148,238 



1,095,644 



1,089,629 



1,123,768 



6,015 


1,139 


1,089,629 


1,122,629 


384,941 
704,688 


429,180 
693,449 



1,122,629 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
MARCH 31, 1985 

1 . Authority and purpose 

The Government Annuities Account was established in 
1908 by the Government Annuities Act, R.S.C. c. G-6, 
and modified by the Government Annuities Improvement 
Act,S.C. 1974-75-76, c. 83. 

The purpose of the Act was to assist individuals and 
groups of Canadians to provide for their later years by 
purchasing Government annuities. The Improvement Act 
increased the rate of return on Government annuity con- 
tracts, increased their flexibility and discontinued future 
sales. 

The Account is administered by the Canada Employ- 
ment and Immigration Commission and operates through 
the Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

2. Significant accounting policies 

(a) Basis of accounting 

The accounts of the Government Annuities Account 
are maintained on an accrual basis. 

(b) Actuarial reserves 

In accordance with Section 1 5 of the Acts, and with 
the Government Annuities Regulations, actuarial 
reserves comprise: (i) in respect of unmatured annui- 
ties, accumulated premiums and accrued interest, and 
(ii) in respect of matured annuities, the present value 
of such annuities actuarially determined on the basis 
of such rate or rates of interest and mortality tables as 
is prescribed. 

(c) Actuarial surplus due to Canada 

If at the end of any fiscal year the recorded amount of 
actuarial reserves exceeds or is less than the calculated 
amount of actuarial reserves, the difference results in 
an actuarial surplus or deficit which is charged or 
credited to the Government Annuities Account within 
the Consolidated Revenue Fund. 

(d) Interest from Canada 

Interest from Canada is calculated annually on 
actuarial reserves, at a rate of seven per cent, as 
required by the Improvement Act. 

(e) Unclaimed annuities 

Unclaimed annuities represent amounts transferred to 
the Consolidated Revenue Fund in respect of annuities 
that could not be paid because the annuitants could 
not be located. 

3. Actuarial surplus 

As of March 31, 1985, a refined retrospective valuation 
method for deferred annuities was adopted, which result- 
ed in a $13,373,000 reduction in actuarial reserves and 
therefore in a corresponding amount of additional actuari- 
al surplus being generated. 

The assumptions regarding the distribution of matured 
government annuities by frequency and by incidence of 
payment were also revised. The ensuing modification 
providing for the earlier incidence of payment than 
assumed heretofore resulted in an increase in actuarial 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS 8*33 

Government Annuities Account — Concluded 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
MARCH 31, mS— Concluded 

reserves of $7,358,000 thus reducing by the same amount 
the actuarial surplus for the year. 

Had these two changes not taken place, the actuarial 
surplus would have amounted to $829,000 instead of the 
actual amount of $6,01 5,000. 

4. Actuarial reserves 

The method utilized to calculate the actuarial reserves 
of $ 1 ,089,629,000 ( 1 984—$ 1 , 1 22,629,000) was in accord- 
ance with subsection 15(1) of the Government Annuities 
Improvement Act, S.C. 1974-75-76, c. 83 and the Regula- 
tions pertaining thereto. 

The Regulations provide that the Mortality Tables to 
be used in the preparation of tables for determining the ^ 

values of annuities shall be the Annuity Table for 1949 
without projection for males and females and modified by 
Projection Scale C. 

Mortality experience in recent years has shown that life 
expectancy has increased at a faster rate than that pro- 
vided by Projection Scale C. Should this trend continue at 
the same rate in the future, the 1949 Mortality table 
adjusted by Projection Scale C may need to be modified 
and could result in a potential liability that would impact 
future actuarial reserves. Sufficient information is not 
available at this time to determine this liability. However, 
the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission 
has in progress mortality analysis and projects to deter- 
mine this amount. 

5. Services provided without charge 

Administrative services are provided to the Account by 
the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission 
without charge. 

For the year ended March 31, 1985, the cost of these 
services amounted to $3,654,000 (1984— $3,532,000), 
including amounts for services provided without charge by 
other Government departments to the Commission. 



8-34 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Dependants) 
Pension Fund 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

THE HONOURABLE ELMER MACKAY, P.C, M.P. 
SOLICITOR GENERAL OF CANADA 

I have examined the statement of receipts and disburse- 
ments and fund balance of the Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police (Dependants) Pension Fund for the year ended March 
31, 1985. My examination was made in accordance with 
generally accepted auditing standards, and accordingly includ- 
ed such tests and other procedures as I considered necessary in 
the circumstances. 

In my opinion, this financial statement presents fairly the 
receipts and disbursements of the Fund and its balance for the 
year ended March 31, 1985 in accordance with the basis of 
accounting set out in Note 2 to the financial statement, 
applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

RAYMOND DUBOIS, C.A. 

Deputy Auditor General 

for the Auditor General of Canada 

Ottawa, Canada 
July 26, 1985 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

AND FUND BALANCE 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1985 





1985 


1984 


Receipts 

Interest 

Contributions 


$ 

1,381,597 
30,052 


$ 

1,259,973 
31,205 




1,411,649 


1,291,178 


Disbursements 

Pensions 

Contributions withdrawn 


424,735 
16,826 


459,703 
37,520 








441,561 


497,223 


Excess of receipts over disbursements ... 
Fund balance at beginning of the year... 


970,088 
12,794,271 


793,955 
12,000,316 


Fund balance at end of the year, repre- 
sented by cash on deposit with 
Receiver General for Canada . . 


13,764,359 


12,794,271 







NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
MARCH 31, 1985 

1. Authority and operations 

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (Dependants) 
Pension Fund was established in 1934 by the Royal 
Canadian Mounted Police Pension Continuation Act. The 
Act provides for members of the Force, other than com- 
missioned officers, appointed before March 1, 1949, to 
purchase certain survivorship benefits for their depend- 
ants by payment of specified contributions. The Fund is 
credited with these contributions together with interest 
computed quarterly on the balance to the credit of the 
Fund at the end of the preceding quarter, and charged 
with contributions withdrawn and pensions. All transac- 
tions of the Fund are made through the Consolidated 
Revenue Fund. 

Section 56 of the Act directs the Minister of Finance to 
have an actuarial valuation of the Fund made at least 
once every 5 years. If the actuarial valuation discloses a 
surplus, the Governor in Council may, by order, increase 
pensions. If there is an actuarial deficiency, the Governor 
in Council may direct that there be credited to the Fund, 
out of any unappropriated moneys in the Consolidated 
Revenue Fund, such amount as may be required to re- 
establish solvency of the Fund. 

2. Basis of accounting 

All transactions of the Fund are accounted for on a 
cash basis. 

3. Supplementary information 

The most recent actuarial valuation was made as at 
March 31, 1982. The valuation disclosed an actuarial 
surplus of $1,812,000 of which $692,000 was allocated to 
increased pensions, retroactive to January 1, 1982. 



Approved: 

PIERRE LEMIEUX 
Departmental Services Officer 



R. H. SIMMONDS 

Commissioner 



SECTION 



9 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Other Liabilities 



I CONTENTS 

I Page 

I Interest and matured debt 9.2 

I Accounts payable 9.3 

I Outstanding cheques and warrants 9.3 

I" Allowance for employee vacation and termination benefits 9.3 

I Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corporations expect- 

I ed to be repaid by the Government 9.3 

I Miscellaneous 9.4 



9-2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



OTHER LIABILITIES 

This section contains information on accounts reported on 
the Statement of Assets and Liabilities under "Other Liabili- 
ties". The establishment and operation of these accounts is 
authorized by Parliament in annual appropriation acts and 
other legislation. 

Some tables in this section present the continuity of 
accounts, by showing the opening and closing balances, as well 



as receipts and other credits, and payments and other charges, 
i.e. inflow and outflow of transactions. In addition, the term 
"account without current transactions" has been included in 
one table, to provide a link with figures published in the 
previous year's edition of the Public Accounts, and to show net 
transactions in accounts which were closed out in the previous 
year. 

Table 9. 1 presents the year-end balances for other liabilities. 



TABLE 9.1 

OTHER LIABILITIES 



April 1/1984 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



Interest and matured debt. Table 9.2 9,638,712,873 

Less: unamortized discount on Treasury bills 1,016,378,026 

8.622.334,847 

Accounts payable 4,306,991,768 

Outstanding cheques and warrants, Table 9.3 3,046,343,735 

Allowance for employee vacation and termination benefits 1,900,000,000 

Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corporations expected to be 
repaid by the Government — 

Borrowings of agent Crown corporations 10,763,184,000 

Less: borrowings expected to be repaid by these Crown corporations .... 10,675,258,000 

87.926.000 

Miscellaneous, Table 9.4 134,079.188 

Total 18,097,675.538 



10,805.851.400 
1.387.407.202 
9,418,444.198 
5,555.515,450 
3,422,522,153 
2,050,000,000 



12,864,133,000 

12,810,306,000 

53.827.000 

185,079,149 



1,167,138,527 
371,029,176 
796.109.351 

1,248,523,682 
376,178,418 
150,000,000 



2,100,949,000 

2,135.048,000 

- 34.099.000 

50.999.961 



1,240,835,889 
328,305,554 
912.530.335 

1,015,385,908 
516,384,941 
150,000,000 



2,713,014,000 

2,911.889,000 

- 198.875.000 

19.927.206 



20.685,387.950 



2.587.712.412 



2.415,353.390 



Interest and Matured Debt 

Interest and matured debt includes interest due, interest 
accrued, provision for compound and bonus interest on Canada 
savings bonds, and matured debt. 



Table 9.2 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions in this account. 



TABLE 9.2 

INTEREST AND MATURED DEBT 



April 1/1984 
$ 

Interest due 4,746.601.331 

Interest accrued 3,822.103.131 

Provision for compound and bonus interest on 
Canada savings bonds — 

Compound interest 116.480.000 

Bonus interest 646,891.000 

763.371.000 

Matured debt 306,637,41 1 

Total 9,638,712,873 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



12,367,732,308 
16,351,334.875 



24,550.000 
105.540,000 
130.090.000 



11.737.576,623 
15,441,389,490 



82.580,000 
488,921,000 
571.501.000 



130,157,953,469 130,089,505,012 



5,376,757,016 
4,732,048,516 



58,450,000 
263.510,000 
321.960.000 

375.085,868 



630,155,685 
909,945,385 



- 58,030.000 
-383,381.000 
-441.411,000 

68,448.457 



1,115.983,380 
179.949.754 



41,536.000 
249,179.000 
207,643.000 

152.545.755 



159.007.110.652 157,839,972,125 10,805.851,400 



1,167.138.527 1,240,835,889 



OTHER LIABILITIES 



9*3 



Interest due 

Interest due is the interest on the bonded debt, which is due 
and payable but has not been redeemed by bond holders. 

Interest accrued 

Interest accrued is the interest accumulated as at March 31 
on the bonded debt and certain other liabilities, that is not 
payable until a future date. 

Provision for compound and bonus interest on Canada savings 
bonds 

This account records the estimated future obligations for 
additional interest payments, to holders of certain Canada 
savings bonds. 

Matured debt 

This account records financial obligations represented by 
certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of 
Canada, that have become due but that have not been present- 
ed for redemption. Unclaimed matured bonds are transferred 
to non-tax revenue if they remain unredeemed 15 years after 
the date of call or maturity, whichever is earlier; the minimum 
time before such a transfer is made is 5 years from the date of 
maturity. 



Unamortized Discount on Treasury Bills 

This account records the portion of the discount on out- 
standing Treasury bills which has not yet been charged to 
expenditure. The discount is amortized as an expenditure over 
the term of issue. 



Accounts Payable 

This account represents amounts owing at the year end 
pursuant to contractual arrangements, or for work performed, 
goods received, or services rendered, relating to appropriations 
on which Parliament has imposed annual ceilings, and items to 
be paid from certain statutory authorities. 



Outstanding Cheques and Warrants 

This account records cheques and warrants issued but not 
yet presented for payment. 

Table 9.3 presents a summary of the balances in this 
account. 



TABLE 9.3 



OUTSTANDING CHEQUES AND WARRANTS 



Outstanding cheques 

Imprest account cheques 

Unemployment Insurance warrants 

Total 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



April 1/1984 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


S 

2,802,614,279 

496,012 

243,233,444 


$ 

3,168,000,593 

596,547 

253,925,013 


S 

365,386,314 

100,535 

10,691,569 


S 

550,279,535 

- 10,294 

- 33,884,300 


3,046,343.735 


3,422,522,153 


376,178,418 


516,384,941 



Outstanding cheques 

Cheques issued in Canadian dollars, and unpaid at March 
31, are recorded in this account. Cheques outstanding for 10 
years are transferred to non-tax revenue. During the year, an 
amount of $2,716,264 was transferred to revenue. 

Cheques in foreign currencies are credited to the Govern- 
ment's cash account at the time of issue. 

Imprest account cheques 

Imprest account cheques issued and unpaid at March 31, 
with the exception of those outstanding for 10 years or more 
(which have been transferred to non-tax revenue), are record- 
ed in this account. During the year, an amount of $10,822 was 
transferred to revenue. 

Unemployment Insurance warrants 

This account records outstanding Unemployment Insurance 
benefit warrants. 

Allowance for Employee Vacation and Termi- 
nation Benefits 

This account represents allowances for amounts owing for 
earned and unpaid annual vacation leave ($400 million) and 



for employee benefits payable upon termination of employ- 
ment ($1,650 million). 

Allowance for Borrowings of Agent Crown 
Corporations Expected to be Repaid by the 
Government 

In accordance with Section 45 of the Financial Administra- 
tion Act, the payment of all money borrowed by agent Crown 
corporations, and interest thereon, is a charge on and payable 
out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund. Such borrowings 
therefore constitute unconditional obligations of the Govern- 
ment. 

This account reports the borrowings of agent Crown corpo- 
rations expected to be repaid by the Government (see Table 
7.4 in Section 7 of this volume) and does not include the 
borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc since Par- 
liament already provided authority (Regional Industrial 
Expansion Vote 7c, Appropriation Act No 4, 1984-85) to 
assume the debt of this Corporation. The borrowings of this 
Corporation are reported under Unmatured Debt (Section 1 1 
of this volume) on the Government's Statement of Assets and 
Liabilities. 



9*4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Other Liabilities — Miscellaneous 

Table 9.4 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for other miscellaneous liabilities. 



TABLE 9.4 

OTHER LIABILITIES— MISCELLANEOUS 



April 1/1984 



Receipts and 
other credits 



Payments and 
other charges 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited — 

Unpresented capital stock 23,695 

Miscellaneous departmental paylist deductions .. 21,069,282 
Contractors' and other holdbacks — 

Agriculture 2,087,267 

Communications 608,319 

National Library 15,998 

Public Archives 25,000 

Consumer and Corporate Affairs 3,481 

Employment and Immigration 9,232 

Energy, Mines and Resources 5,340,479 

Atomic Energy Control Board 67,512 

Environment 2,799,037 

External Affairs 777,999 

Canadian International Development 

Agency 13,744,856 

Fisheries and Oceans 969,069 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development 2,281,712 

Justice 

National Defence 27,136,228 

National Health and Welfare 329,730 

National Revenue — 

Customs and Excise 171,761 

Public Works 18,585,019 

Regional Industrial Expansion 304,414 

Science and Technology — 

National Research Council 2,564,308 

Solicitor General — 

Administration program 383,318 

Correctional Service 870,339 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 627,796 

Supply and Services — 

Supply program 2,246,546 

Services program 

Transport 18,561,194 

Canadian Transport Commission 16,349 

Account without current transactions 

100,526.963 

Suspense accounts 12,459,248 

Account without current transactions 

Total 134,079,188 







23,695 




-68 


13,200,996 


21,069,282 


13,200,996 


- 7,868,286 


6,098,920 


3,208,988 


3,474,968 


1,821.287 


- 265,980 


341,866 


2,067,281 


742,395 


1,933.205 


1,324,886 


- 18,493 


17,854 




33.852 


17,854 


15,998 




25,000 




-25,000 


25,000 


20,686 


20,000 


4,167 


686 


3,481 


51,073 


30,936 


29,369 


20,137 


- 53,990 


10,474,355 


7,259,235 


8,555,599 


3,215,120 


1,599,253 


101,768 


114,301 


54,979 


-12,533 


31,793 


700,992 


664,106 


2,835.923 


36,886 


188,033 


1,110,262 


509,631 


1,378.630 


600,631 


309,809 


20,602,797 


18,841,070 


15.506,583 


1,761,727 


2,998,742 


3,385,201 


1,971,990 


2.382,280 


1.413,211 


- 83,646 


42,877 


1,536,227 


788,362 


- 1.493,350 


304,993 


19,460 


16,765 


2,695 


2,695 


-3,300 


116,536,796 


76,115,197 


67,557,827 


40.421,599 


2,084,759 


110,813 


53,767 


386,776 


57,046 


17,949 


1,003,091 


257,217 


917,635 


745,874 


171,761 


31,788,699 


27,874,679 


22,499,039 


3,914,020 


5,331,215 


76,280 


58.829 


321,865 


17,451 


- 55,008 


3,489,772 


2,677,238 


3,376,842 


812,534 


220,506 


261,974 


441,831 


203,461 


- 179,857 


74,581 


901,330 


663,204 


1,108.465 


238,126 


667,817 


1,116,003 


192.873 


1,550,926 


923,130 


601,464 


667,747 


156,094 


2,758,199 


511.653 


911,700 


4,493 




4,493 


4.493 




25,100,948 


22,927,831 


20,734,311 


2.173.117 


3,436,570 


2,886 


4,394 


14,841 


- 1,508 


-772 
- 7,083 


222.864.426 


166.629.778 


156.761.611 


56.234.648 


19.114.998 


2,633,599 




15,092,847 


2,633,599 


- 2,380,403 
-2,906,241 


238,699,021 


187,699,060 


185,079,149 


50,999,961 


19,927,206 



Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited — Unpresented capital 
stock 

The liability of the Government of Canada for the value of 
the paid-up capital stock of the former company, which has 
not been redeemed at the close of the year, is recorded herein. 

Miscellaneous departmental paylist deductions 

Deductions from the salaries and wages of certain 
employees are credited to this account pending transmittal to 
related outside organizations. 



Contractors' and other holdbacks 

This account records the amounts withheld to ensure that 
contracts are carried out as stipulated. Holdbacks are charged 
to appropriations of departments or agencies concerned, and 
are credited to this account under Section 35 of the Financial 
Administration Act. They are paid out in accordance with 
contracts under regulations of the Treasury Board. 

Suspense accounts 

Accounts in which transactions are recorded temporarily, 
pending their ultimate disposition. 



SECTION 



10 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Foreign Exchange Accounts 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances 10.2 

International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 10.3 

International Monetary Fund — Notes payable 10.3 

Special Drawing Rights allocations 10.3 

Supplementary statement — 

Exchange Fund Account 10.4 



10-2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 

Foreign exchange accounts represent financial claims and 
obligations of the Government of Canada which are identified 
with Canada's foreign exchange operations. Financial claims 
and obligations denominated in foreign currencies are reported 
at Canadian dollar equivalents at March 3 1 . Net gains result- 
ing from the translation of the net assets denominated in 
foreign currencies, to Canadian dollar equivalents as at March 
31, are credited to revenue as premium and discount on 
exchange, and net losses are charged to budgetary expenditure 
of the Department of Finance. 



Table 10.1 presents the continuity of each foreign exchange 
account, by showing the opening and closing balances, as well 
as receipts and other credits, and payments and other charges. 
It should be noted, however, that this table excludes 
unmatured debt payable in foreign currencies, amounting to 
$9,057 million as at March 31, 1985 ($6,086 million as at 
March 31, 1984); details relating to these obligations are 
presented in Section 1 1 of this volume. 



TABLE 10.1 

FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 



Exchange Fund Account — Advances 

International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 

Less: International Monetary Fund — Notes 

payable 

Special Drawing Rights allocations 

Total foreign exchange accounts (net) 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



April 1/1984 


Receipts and 
other credits 


Payments and 
other charges 


March 31/1985 


1985 


1984 


$ 


S 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 


3,399,467,901 
3,995,201,450 
7,394,669.351 


19,539,014.501 

34,724.466 

19.573.738.967 


20,316.185.330 

24.783.886 

20.340.969.216 


4,176,638,730 
3,985,260.870 
8.161.899.600 


777,170,829 
- 9,940,580 
767.230.249 


-766,191,268 

1,278,989,540 

512.798.272 


3,243,766,031 
1,058,626,501 
4,302.392.532 


150,783,885 
150.783.885 


118.766.031 

2.634.001 

121.400.032 


3.275,783,885 
1,055,992,500 
4.331.776.385 


32,017,854 
-2,634,001 
29.383.853 


961.134,845 

18,726,339 

979.861.184 


3,092,276.819 


19,724,522,852 


20,462,369,248 


3.830,123.215 


737,846,396 


-467,062,912 



Exchange Fund Account — Advances 

This account records the moneys advanced from the Gov- 
ernment of Canada to the Exchange Fund Account, in Canadi- 
an and other currencies, for the purchase of gold, foreign 
currencies and securities, and Special Drawing Rights (SDRs). 

The Exchange Fund Account is operated under the provi- 
sions of the Currency Act. In accordance with this Act, 
audited financial statements for the Exchange Fund Account 
are prepared for each calendar year. These financial state- 
ments as at December 31, 1984, together with the Auditor 
General's report thereon, are found at the end of this section. 



Table 10.2 shows advances to, and assets held by, the 
Exchange Fund Account as at March 31, 1985. Gold held by 
the Account is valued at 35 SDRs per fine ounce ($47.31 Cdn 
as at March 31, 1985 and $47.53 Cdn as at March 31, 1984). 

In 1984-85, payments and other charges consisted of 
advances to the Exchange Fund Account in the amount of 
$20,110 million, and a valuation adjustment of $206 million. 
Receipts and other credits consisted of repayments of advances 
of $19,408 million, and a valuation adjustment of 
$131 million. 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 
TABLE 10.2 

EXCHANGE FUND ACCOUNT— ASSETS 



March 31/ 
1985 



March 31/ 
1984 



(in millions of dollars) 



Advances by the Consolidated Revenue Fund 

were denominated as follows: 
US dollars (198S, US S4,300 million; 1984, 

US $2,800 million)(i) 

Deutsche marks (1985, DM 200 million; 

1984, DM 700 million) 

Swiss francs (1985, SF 1,676 million; 1984, 

SF 1,188 million) 

Japanese yen (1985, Y 186,150 million; 

1984, Y 70,000 million) 

Special Drawing Rights (1985, SDR 383.3 

million; 1984, SDR 383.3 million) 

Less: Canadian dollar deposit with the 
Receiver General for Canada 

Total advances from the Consolidated Reve- 
nue Fund 

Assets flnanced by advances from the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund: 

US cash on deposit 

US dollar short-term deposits 

US dollar investments 

Deutsche marks short-term deposits 

Swiss francs short-term deposits 

Special Drawing Rights 

International Monetary Fund notes 

Gold 

Canadian cash on deposit 

Total 

Less: income not yet transferred to the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund — 
Deferred valuation gains at previous 

December 31 90 

Total income and net valuation gains 

(losses) from January I to March 31 - 56 

34 



5,864 


3.573 


89 


346 


885 


707 


1,014 


398 


518 


520 


8.370 


5.544 


4,193 


2,145 


4,177 


3,399 


110 


425 


1,023 


32 


1,852 


1.621 




274 




(2) 


48 


74 


224 


237 


953 


959 


4.211 


3.623 



192 



32 
224 



4,177 



3,399 



(') Excludes 1962 issue (1985, $65,452,800; 1984, $63,294,560) and 1968 issue 
(1985, $136,360,000; 1984, $127,610,000), the proceeds of which were 
advanced to the Exchange Fund Account in Canadian dollars. 

(« Less than $500,000. 



International Monetary Fund — Subscriptions 

This account records the value of Canada's quota (i.e. 
subscription assigned) in the capital of the International 
Monetary Fund (IMF). 

The amount by which the sum of Canada's subscriptions 
and loans to the IMF, under special facilities, exceeds the 
IMF's holdings of Canadian dollars represents the amount of 
foreign exchange which Canada is entitled to draw from the 
IMF on demand, for balance of payments purposes. The 
subscription is expressed in terms of the SDR, a unit of 
account defined in terms of a "basket" of five major 
currencies. 



10*3 



Canada has accumulated its subscriptions through settle- 
ments to the IMF in Canadian dollars, gold and SDRs. 
Annual maintenance of value payments are made to, or 
received from, the IMF when the Canadian dollar depreciates 
or appreciates against the SDR, in order to maintain the 
SDR-value of the IMF's holdings of Canadian dollars. In 
1984-85, receipts and other credits consisted of a valuation 
adjustment of $3 million and a maintenance of value adjust- 
ment of $32 million, while payments and other charges consist- 
ed of a maintenance of value adjustment of $25 million. 



International Monetary Fund — Notes Payable 

This account records non-marketable, non-interest bearing 
notes issued by the Government of Canada to the IMF. These 
notes are payable on demand and are subject to redemption or 
re-issue, depending on the needs of the IMF for Canadian 
currency. 

Canadian dollar holdings of the IMF include these notes 
and a small working balance (initially equal to one-quarter of 
one percent of Canada's subscription) held on deposit at the 
Bank of Canada. In 1984-85, notes payable to the IMF 
increased by $32 million. 



Special Drawing Rights Allocations 

This account records the value of SDRs allocated to Canada 
by the IMF. The Special Drawing Right is an international 
currency created by the IMF, and allocated to countries 
participating in its Special Drawing Rights Department. It 
represents a liability of Canada, as circumstances could arise 
whereby Canada could be called upon to repay these alloca- 
tions, in part or in total. 

As an asset, SDRs represent rights to purchase currencies of 
other countries participating in the IMF's Special Drawing 
Rights Department, as well as to make payments to the IMF 
itself. All SDRs allocated to Canada by the IMF have either 
been used to settle subscriptions in the IMF, or have been 
advanced to the Exchange Fund Account. 

There was no allocation of SDRs by the IMF to Canada 
during the year. In 1984-85, payments and other charges 
consisted of a valuation adjustment of $3 million. 



10*4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT 
Exchange Fund Account 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

THE HONOURABLE MICHAEL WILSON, P.C, M.P. 
MINISTER OF FINANCE 

I have examined the balance sheet of the Exchange Fund 
Account as at December 31,1 984 and the statement of income 
for the year then ended. My examination was made in accord- 
ance with generally accepted auditing standards, and accord- 
ingly included such tests and other procedures as I considered 
necessary in the circumstances. 



In my opinion, these financial statements present fairly the 
financial position of the Account as at December 31,1 984 and 
the results of its operations for the year then ended in accord- 
ance with the accounting policies set out in Note 2 to the 
financial statements applied on a basis consistent with that of 
the preceding year. 



D. 



LARRY MEYERS, F.C.A. 
Deputy Auditor General 
for the Auditor General of Canada 



Ottawa, Canada 
March 5, 1985 



BALANCE SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1984 
(in millions of dollars) 



ASSETS 



1984 



1983 



US 



Cdn 



US 



2,834.0 



Cdn 



Denominated in US dollars 

Cash and short-term deposits 236.6 312.7 116.7 145.2 

Securities (Note 3) 943.9 1,247.6 1,848.3 2.300.0 

1,180.5 1,560.3 1,965.0 2,445.2 

Denominated in other foreign curren- 
cies 
Cash and short-term deposits 28.5 37.6 344.6 428.8 

Denominated in Special Drawing 

Rights 
Special Drawing Rights (Note 4) .... 73.1 96.6 24.2 30.1 

International Monetary Fund notes 

(Note 5) 171.0 226.1 135.2 168.2 

Gold (Note 6) 690.9 913.1 739.1 919.8 

935.0 1,235.8 898.5 1,118.1 

Official international reserve assets 

(Note 7) 2,144.0 2,833.7 3,208.1 3,992.1 

Denominated in Canadian dollars 
Cash 0.3 0.7 



3,992.8 



LIABILITIES 

Due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund 

Advances (Note 8) 

Net income for the year 

Provision for valuation losses on uncom- 
pleted contracts (Note 9) 

Deferred net valuation gains 



1984 



1983 



Cdn 


Cdn 


2,311.8 
414.0 


3,210.4 
590.8 


2,725.8 


3,801.2 


17.9 
90.3 


0.2 
191.4 



2,834.0 



3,992.8 



Approved: 

GERALD BOUEY 

Governor 
Bank of Canada 

ROBERT JARRETT 

Chief, Foreign Exchange Operations 

Bank of Canada 

MARSHALL A. COHEN 

Deputy Minister 
Department of Finance 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 



10-5 



Exchange Fund Account — Continued 

STATEMENT OF INCOME 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1984 

(in millions of Canadian dollars) 



1984 



1983 



Investment income 

Cash and short-term deposits 

US dollar securities 

Special Drawing Rights 

International Monetary Fund notes 

Gold loans 

Net valuation gains 

During the year (Note 10) 

Deferred from previous years 

Deferred to subsequent years 

Net income for the year, due to the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund 



68.6 


57.7 


149.7 


236.6 


6.5 


11.5 


27.0 


8.8 


0.1 


0.6 


251.9 


315.2 


61.0 


148.9 


191.4 


318.1 


(90.3) 


(191.4) 


162.1 


275.6 



414.0 



590.8 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, 1984 

1 . Authority and objective 

The Account is governed by Part II of the Currency 
and Exchange Act, R.S.C. 1970, c.C-39, as amended (the 
Act). Amendments made in 1984 changed the title of the 
Act to the Currency Act. The Account is in the name of 
the Minister of Finance and is administered by the Bank 
of Canada as fiscal agent. The Account is funded by 
advances from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) 
which are limited to Cdn $10 billion by Order in Council 
dated March 1, 1979 and are not subject to interest. The 
net income for the year due to the CRF is payable within 
three months after the end of the year. 

The main objective of the Account is to aid in the 
control and protection of the external value of the Canadi- 
an dollar and the Minister acquires for the Account those 
assets which are deemed appropriate for this purpose in 
accordance with the Act. 

2. Accounting policies 

Valuation of assets 

US dollar securities. Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) 
and International Monetary Fund (IMF) notes are 
adjusted for amortized premiums and discounts where 
applicable, and include accrued interest. Gold is recorded 
at 35 SDRs per fine ounce. Cash and short-term deposits 
include accrued interest where applicable. 

Translation of foreign currencies and SDRs 

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies 
are translated into Canadian dollars at the year-end 
exchange rates in the Canadian foreign exchange market. 
Assets and liabilities denominated in SDRs are first trans- 
lated into US dollars at the year-end US dollar value of 
the SDR, as calculated by the IMF, and then into 
Canadian dollars. Investment income in foreign curren- 
cies is translated into Canadian dollars at the foreign 
exchange rates prevailing on the date the income is 
recorded. The assets and liabilities denominated in foreign 
currencies and SDRs have been translated into Canadian 
dollars at the following year-end exchange rates: 



1984 



1983 



US dollar 

Deutsche mark 

Swiss franc 

Japanese yen 

Special Drawing Right 



1.3217 


1 .2444 


0.4187 


0.4562 


0.5078 


0.5702 


0.005248 


0.005370 


1.29554 


1.30283 



10*6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Exchange Fund Account — Continued 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, \9%A— Continued 

Investment income 

Investment income is recorded on an accrual basis and 
includes interest earned, amortization of premiums and 
discounts, and gains and losses on the sale of securities. 

Valuation gains and losses 

Valuation gains and losses include the increases and 
decreases in the value of assets and liabilities arising from 
the translation of foreign currencies and SDRs during the 
year and at year end. Valuation gains and losses also 
include gains or losses on transactions in foreign curren- 
cies, SDRs and gold, and on the liquidation of liabilities. 
In accordance with the provisions of the Act, valuation 
gains and losses for the year are taken into income in 
three equal portions over the current and two succeeding 
years. 

Operating expenses 

The Bank of Canada provides, without charge, the 
administrative, custodial and fiscal agency services to 
carry out the objectives of the Account. 



3. Securities denominated in US dollars 



1984 



1983 



us Government treasury bills 

International Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion and Development bonds 

Accrued interest 



(in millions of US dollars) 
843.9 1,817.3 



95.0 
5.0 



30.0 
1.0 



943.9 



1,848.3 



Estimated market value at year end: 

1984— US $944 million (Cdn $1,248 million) 
1983— US $1,848 million (Cdn $2,300 million) 



4. Special Drawing Rights 

SDRs were created by the IMF to supplement interna- 
tional reserve assets. SDRs are allocated to member coun- 
tries in proportion to their quotas in the IMF and can be 
used in transactions between participants in the SDR 
Department of the IMF or in transactions with the IMF 
itself. The value of the SDR is calculated by the IMF as a 
weighted average of the market values of five major 
currencies. At year end, one SDR was equivalent to US 
$0.980205 (1983— US $1.04695). 

The liability of a member country to the IMF in respect 
of cumulative SDR allocations is the settlement obligation 
that would be incurred upon the termination of that 
country's participation in the SDR Department of the 
IMF or on the liquidation by the IMF of this Department. 
SDRs allocated to Canada by the IMF are advanced from 
the CRF to the Account. However, some SDRs have 
subsequently been returned to the CRF and used to pay 
part of Canada's increased subscription in the IMF. 

The IMF pays interest on SDRs held and charges 
interest at an identical rate on the cumulative allocations. 
The interest rate is based on short-term money market 
rates in the countries whose currencies are used to calcu- 
late the value of the SDR. Interest paid by the IMF on 
SDRs held by the Account is included in investment 
income. Interest on Canada's cumulative allocations is 
charged directly to the CRF. 

The following is a reconciliation between the IMF 
cumulative allocations of SDRs to Canada and the SDRs 
held by the Account: 



1984 



1983 



Cumulative allocations to Canada .... 

Less: SDRs used to pay part of 
Canada's increased subscription 
in the IMF 

Net advances to the Account 

Less: net sales 

Held at end of the year 

Accrued interest 



Held at end of the year . 
Accrued interest 



(in millions of SDRs) 
779.3 779.3 



396.0 


396.0 


383.3 
309.6 


383.3 
363.2 


73.7 
0.9 


20.1 
3.0 


74.6 


23.1 




(in millions of US dollars) 

72.2 21.0 
0.9 3.2 


73.1 


24.2 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS 



10'7 



Exchange Fund Account — Continued 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, \9%A— Continued 



5. International Monetary Fund notes 



1984 



1983 



Supplementary 

notes 

Accrued interest 


Financing 


Facility 


(in millions of SDRs) 

164.2 123.6 
10.3 5.5 














174.5 129.1 


Notes 

Accrued interest 




(in millions of US dollars) 

160.9 129.4 
10.1 5.8 












_ 


171.0 135.2 



These notes represent Canada's participation in the 
Supplementary Financing Facility established to assist 
members of the IMF with balance of payments needs. 
The notes were acquired in 1980, 1983 and 1984 and have 
original terms to maturity of five years. They are redeem- 
able on demand if Canada represents that it has a balance 
of payments need and are transferable to other members. 



6. Gold 



Held at beginning of the year. 
Sales 

Held at end of the year 



1984 



1983 



(in thousands of fine ounces) 



20,170 
33 



20,263 
93 



20,137 



20,170 



(in millions of US dollars) 
690.9 739.1 



Gold is recorded at 35 SDRs (US $34.31; 1983— US 
$36.64) per fine ounce. During the year, the market price 
of gold, as recorded at the London fixings, ranged from a 
low of US $303.25 (1983— US $374.25) per fine ounce to 
a high of US $406.85 (1983— US $511.50) and closed at 
US $309.00 (1983— US $381.50). 

The Minister of Finance has authorized loans and/or 
sales, at market related prices, of part of the gold held by 
the Account, to the Royal Canadian Mint and others. At 
year end, the Account's gold holdings included gold loans 
of 88 thousand (1983 — 40 thousand) fine ounces. 

7. Official international reserve assets 

The Account is the principal repository of Canada's 
official international reserves. These international 
reserves, as defined by the Minister of Finance, consist of 
assets held by the Account as well as foreign assets held 
by both the Bank of Canada and the CRF. 



8. Due to the Consolidated Revenue Fund — Advances 



1984 



Foreign currencies and SDRs 

US dollars 

Swiss francs 

Japanese yen 

SDRs 

Deutsche marks 

" 5,859.8 
Less: Canadian dollar deposit 
with the Receiver General 
for Canada 3,548.0 



1983 





(in millions) 




Amount 


CdnS 


Amount 


CdnS 


2,400 


3.172.1 


2.400 


2,986.6 


2.186 


1. 110.1 


1,198 


683.1 


190,000 


997.3 


100,000 


537.0 


383 


496.6 


383 


499.4 


200 


83.7 


700 


319.3 



2,311.8 



5.025.4 



1,815.0 
3.210.4 



The proceeds of Canada's borrowings in foreign curren- 
cy and the IMF allocations of SDRs have been advanced 
in foreign currency and SDRs from the CRF to the 
Account. The borrowings include foreign bond and note 
issues and bank loans, as well as borrowings under Stand- 
by Credit Arrangements with Canadian and foreign 
banks. Redemptions of such borrowings are made using 
the resources of the Account. Interest payable by Canada 
on borrowings in foreign currencies is charged directly to 
the CRF. 

9. Provision for valuation losses on uncompleted contracts 

At year end, the Account had outstanding short-term 
swap arrangements with the Bank of Canada as well as 
uncompleted foreign exchange transactions. 

As the exchange rates on these uncompleted contracts 
differ from the year-end rates at which the Account's 
assets and liabilities are valued, additional valuation gains 
or losses will occur up)on settlement. The provision for 
valuation losses on uncompleted contracts arises from the 
revaluation of such contracts using the year-end rates of 
exchange and represents the portion of future net losses 
attributed to the current year. 

Under the swap arrangements with the Bank of 
Canada, the Account sells US dollars to the Bank and 
agrees to repurchase these amounts at the same exchange 
rates at which they were sold. These contracts are under- 
taken to assist in the Bank's management of chartered 
banks' cash reserves. Swaps outstanding at year end 
amounted to US $370 million (Cdn $488 million) (1983 
— US $225 million; Cdn $280 million). Assets trans- 
ferred to the Bank under swap arrangements remain part 
of Canada's official international reserves. 



10 • 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Exchange Fund Account — Concluded 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
DECEMBER 31, \9%4— Concluded 

10. Net valuation gains (losses) during the year 



1984 



1983 



Swiss francs 

US dollars 

Japanese yen 

Gold 

Deutsche marks 

Special Drawing Rights 

Gain on gold sales 

Net valuation gains during the 
year 



Assets 


Liabilities 


Total 


Total 


(in millions of Canadian i 


dollars) 


(43.4) 


135.6 


92.2 


54.7 


129.2 


(197.6) 


(68.4) 


18.7 


8.8 


13.9 


22.7 


(2.5) 


(5.1) 




(5.1) 


(37.3) 


1.5 


2.7 


4.2 


41.7 


(1.3) 


2.8 


1.5 


26.4 


89.7 


(42.6) 


47.1 
13.9 


101.7 






47.2 






61.0 


148.9 



m 



SECTION 



11 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Unmatured Debt 



CONTENTS 



Page 



Marketable bonds 11.2 

Canada savings bonds 11.6 

Special non-marketable bonds 11.7 

Treasury bills 11.8 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid 

by the Government 11.8 

Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies 11.8 

Interest rates 11.9 

Maturity of Government debt 11.10 



11*2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS. 1984-85 



UNMATURED DEBT 

Unmatured debt represents financial obligations resulting 
from certificates of indebtedness issued by the Government of 
Canada that have not yet become due. It also includes the 
borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid 
by the Government. 

The Government's holdings of its own securities have been 
deducted from unmatured debt, to report the amount of the 
Government's liabilities to outside parties. 



Some tables in this section present the continuity of 
accounts, by showing the opening and closing balances, as well 
as issues and retirements, i.e. inflow and outflow of transac- 
tions. In addition, the term "account(s) without current trans- 
actions" has been included in some tables, to provide a link 
with figures published in the previous year's edition of the 
Public Accounts, and to show net transactions in accounts 
which were closed out in the previous year. 



TABLE 11.1 

UNMATURED DEBT 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 
April 1/1984 Issues Retirements March 31/1985 1985 1984 

$ s $ s s s 

Payable in Canadian currency — 

Marketable bonds, Tabls 11.2 56,810,901,000 20,931,377,000 8,486,063,000 69,256,215,000 12,445,314.000 8,507,320,550 

Canada savings bonds. Table 11.3 38,204,327,100 12,773,881,137 9,018,777,781 41,959.430,456 3,755,103,356 5,563.327.150 

Special non-marketable bonds issued to the 
Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund, 

Table 11.4 188,676,000 16,661,000 205,337,000 16,661,000 17,259.000 

Treasurybills, Table 11.5 41,700,000,000 134,525,000,000 123,925.000.000 52,300,000.000 10.600.000,000 12,575,000,000 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corpora- 
tion Inc to be repaid by the Government 150,000,000 34,000.000 84,000,000 100,000,000 -50.000,000 150,000,000 

137.053.904.100 168.280.919.137 141.513.840.781 163.820.982.456 26.767.078.356 26.812.906.700 
Less: Government's holdings of unmatured 
debt- 
Marketable bonds 163,975.846 169,641,818 291,625,906 41,991.758 -121,984,088 163,974,746 

Canada savings bonds held on account of 

employees 149,992.300 196,525,000 148,006,000 198,511,300 48,519,000 12,986,600 

Special non-marketable bonds issued to the 
Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund... 188,676,000 16,661,000 205,337,000 16,661,000 17,259,000 

502.644,146 382.827,818 439.631.906 445.840.058 -56.804.088 194.220.346 

136.551.259,954 167,898,091,319 141,074,208,875 163.375.142.398 26.823.882,444 26,618,686,354 

Payable in foreign currencies — 

Marketable bonds. Table 11.2 2,182,709,560 226.935,000 292,827,760 2,116,816.800 -65.892.760 -1,226,849,960 

Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies. 

Table 11.6 3,039,125,000 7,284,195.000 4,380,793.250 5,942,526,750 2,903,401,750 1,214,250,000 

Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corpora- 
tion Inc to be repaid by the Government 883,485,000 212,708,000 79,217.000 1.016,976,000 133.491,000 -279.714,000 

6.105.319.560 7,723.838,000 4.752,838,010 9.076.319.550 2.970,999,990 -292,313.960 
Less: Government's holdings of unmatured 
debt- 
Marketable bonds 19.903,400 7.345,400 7,276,800 19.972.000 68,600 7,532,400 

6.085,416.160 7,716.492,600 4.745.561,210 9,056,347.550 2.970.931.390 -299,846,360 

Total unmatured debt 142.636,676,114 175,614,583,919 145,819.770.085 172.431,489,948 29,794,813.834 26.318,839,994 

Note: this table includes unmatured debt issued by the Government of Canada. Borrowings of agent Crown corporations which are unconditional obligations of 
the Government, but not included in unmatured debt, can be found in Section 1 3 of this volume. 



Marketable Bonds 

Marketable bonds are interest- bearing certificates of indebt- 
edness issued by the Government of Canada, and have the 
following characteristics: 

— bought and sold on the open market; 

— payable in Canadian or foreign currency; 

— subject to call or redemption before maturity; 

— fixed dates of maturity; 

— interest payable either in coupon or registered form; and, 

— face value guaranteed at maturity. 



Registered marketable bonds are transferable by endorsement 
and delivery by one holder to another. Bearer marketable 
bonds need not be endorsed. 

Table 1 1 .2 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for marketable bonds. Since most of the marketable 
bonds are not subject to call or redemption before maturity, 
exceptions only are noted in the table. 

The year-end balances of marketable bonds payable in 
foreign currencies were translated into Canadian dollars using 
the closing rates of exchange at March 31, 1985. 



UNMATURED DEBT 
TABLE 11.2 
MARKETABLE BONDS 



11'3 



Maturity date 



Issue date 



Series April 1/1984 l«iuc»<'> Retiremenu'" March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1 985 



1984 



Payable in Canadian currency — 



Matured 1984-85 




1984— Apr 1 


IVi 


Aprl 


8 


Aprl 


9W 


Aprl 


16^4 


June 1 


10 


Augl 


nv* 


Augl 


16 


Augl 


15 


Octl 


8V4 


Octl 


\QVi 


Octl 


MVi 


Dec 15 


WVi 


Dec 15 


14y4 


1985— Feb 1 


13V4 


Mar 15 


i3y4 


Maturing 1985-86 




1985— May 1 


13 


June 6 


9V4 


Julyl 


WVa 


Julyl 


\5Vi 


Sept 1 


XAVi 


Sept 6 


lO'A 


Oct 1 


9'/^ 


Oct! 


ioy4 


Octl 


i2y4 


Dec 6 


9y4 


Dec 15 


8 


Dec 15 


9y4 


1986— Feb 1 


121^ 


Mar 6 


lO'A 


Maris 


10 



Maturing 1986-87 




1986— May 1 


Wh 


June 1 


15'/4 


June 6 


13 


Julyl 


i4y4 


Sept 5 


12'/4 


Oct 1 


8 


Oct 1 


18 


Dec 5 


ioy4 


Dec 15 


10 


1987— Feb 1 


15V4 


Mar 5 


12 


Mar 15 


15 


Maturing 1987-88 




1987— May 1 


12'/4 


June 1 


13 


June 1 


i4y4 


Julyl 


8>/4 


Julyl 


15 


Sept 1 


13'/^ 


Sept 1 


W/* 


Oct 15 


13 


Nov 15 


12 


Decl 


8 


Dec 15 


11 



Apr 1/74 F39 

Apr 1/79 F81 

Oct 1/74 F87 

June 1/81 -July 31/81 .... J63 
Feb 1/79-Mar 15/79 

Aug 15/79- July 1/80 J23 

Mar 1/81 J57 

Feb 1/82-Aug 1/82 J74 

Mar 31/82-May 1/82 .... J77 

Oct 1/79 F91 

Oct 1/79 J28 

Oct 1/80 J48 

Dec 15/79-Feb 1/80 J32 

June 1/82 J80 

Mar 31/81 J59 

Mar 31/80 J37 

May 1/80-Dec 1/80 

Dec 22/80 J40<2) 

June 6/83 H4 

June 1/80 J44 

July 1/82 J83 

Sept 1/82 J86 

Sept 6/83 H7 

Oct 1/80 F96 

Aug 1/80-Nov 22/82 

Dec 15/82 J46 

Oct 15/82 J89 

Dec 6/83 H13 

Dec 15/75-Oct 1/78 F57 

Feb 1/83-May 15/83 J97 

Feb 1/81 J55(2> 

Mar 6/84 H16 

Feb 22/83-Mar 15/83 
Apr27/83-Oct 15/83 
Nov 8/83 HI 

May 1/81 J6lW 

June 1/81 -July 31/81 .... J64W 

June 6/84 H28 

July 1/81 J68W 

Sept 5/84 H37 

Oct 1/69-Fcb 15/70 

Apr 1/77 F47 

Oct 15/81 J72<« 

Dec 5/84 H46 

Dec 15/83-Feb 1/84 H14 

Feb 1/82-Aug 1/82 J75<2) 

Mar 26/85 H55 

Mar 31/82-May 1/82... J78 



May 8/84-Aug 22/84 

Sept 12/84-Oct 1/84 H23 

June 1/84- June 19/84 

July 11/84 H27 

June 1/82 J81 

July 1/77-Sept 1/77 

Dec 15/77 Jll 

July 1/82 J84(» 

Aug 1/84 H31 

Sept 1/82 J87(2) 

Oct 15/82 J90 

Nov 1/82-Apr 1/84 

Oct 24/84 J92 

Dec 1/80 F79 

Dec 15/82-Aug 1/83 

Sept 1/83-Dec 15/84 J96 



69,821,000 




69.821.000 




-69,821,000 




77,000 




77.000 




-77,000 




322,309,000 




322,309,000 




- 322,309,000 




575,000,000 




575,000.000 




- 575,000,000 




1,075,000,000 




1.075.000.000 




-1,075,000.000 




403.580,000 




403.580.000 




- 403,580,000 


- 46,395,000 


300,000,000 




300.000.000 




- 300,000,000 




325,000,000 




325.000.000 




- 325,000,000 




749,000 




749,000 




- 749,000 




300,000,000 




300,000.000 




- 300,000.000 




764,453,000 




764,453,000 




- 764.453,000 


- 10,539,000 


700,000,000 




700,000,000 




- 700.000,000 




100,000,000 




100,000,000 




- 100,000,000 




599,358,000 




599,358,000 




- 599,358,000 


- 642,000 


833,501,000 




833,501,000 




-833,501,000 


- 16,492,000 


6.368.848.000 




6.368.848.000 




-6.368.848.000 


- 74.068.000 


1,798,823.000 




1,783.170.000 


15.653.000 


- 1.783.170.000 


- 1,177,000 


300,000,000 






300,000.000 




300,000,000 


450,000,000 






450,000,000 






350,000,000 






350,000,000 






200,000,000 






200,000,000 






300,000,000 






300,000,000 




300,000,000 


1,345,000 






1,345.000 






850,000,000 






850,000,000 






150,000,000 






150,000,000 






350,000,000 






350,000,000 




350,000,000 


1 16,479,000 






116,479,000 






275,000,000 






275,000,000 




75,000,000 


725,000,000 




417.000 


724,583,000 


-417.000 




350,000,000 






350,000,000 




350,000,000 


625,000,000 






625,000,000 




325,000,000 


6.841.647.000 




1.783.587.000 


5.058.060.000 


- 1.783.587.000 


1.698.823.000 


499,589,000 




644,000 


498,945,000 


-644.000 


-410,000 


816,930.000 




622,000 


816,308,000 


-622.000 


- 73,060,000 




375,000,000 




375,000,000 


375,000,000 




440,285,000 




1,520,000 


438,765,000 


-1,520,000 


-9,715,000 




400,000,000 




400,000,000 


400.000,000 




410.380,000 






410,380,000 






317.664,000 




17,465,000 


300,199,000 


-17.465.000 


- 23,824,000 




450,000.000 




450,000,000 


450.000.000 




200,000,000 






200,000,000 




200,000,000 


1,173,569,000 




29,373,000 


1,144.196,000 


- 29.373.000 


-47,431.000 




400,000,000 




400,000,000 


400.000.000 




800,000,000 






800,000,000 






4.658.417.000 


1.625.000.000 


49.624.000 


6.233.793.000 


1.575.376,000 


45.560.000 




650,000,000 




650,000,000 


650.000.000 






375,000,000 




375,000,000 


375.000.000 




250,000,000 






250,000,000 






525,000,000 






525,000,000 






399,994,000 




30,000 


399,964,000 


-30.000 


-1.000 




150,000,000 




150,000,000 


150,000.000 




649,980,000 




30.000 


649,950,000 


-30,000 


-20.000 


450,000,000 






450,000.000 






200,000,000 


275.000,000 




475.000.000 


275.000.000 




7,000 






7,000 






775,000,000 


125.000,000 




900.000,000 


125.000.000 


450.000.000 



11-4 
TABLE 11.2 

MARKETABLE BONDS— Continued 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, ] 984-85 



Maturity date 



Issue date 



Series April 1/1984 Issues'" Retirements'" March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



1988— Feb 1 83/* 

Feb 1 10'/4 

Febl \VA 

Mar 15 lO'/i 



Maturing 1988-89 

1988— June 1 5 

June 1 5 

Oct 15 10% 

1989— Feb 15 6% 

Feb 15 11 

Mar 15 12'/2 



Maturing 1989-90 
1989— June 1 13'/4 



July 1 
Aug 1 
Oct 1 
Oct 1 



Maturing 1990-91 
1990— May 1 



Sept 1 
Oct 15 
Nov 15 
Dec 15 

1993— Feb 1 



13'/2 

133/4 
10 

10'/2 



Nov 1 103/4 
Nov 1 12'/4 
Dec 15 11 '/4 



1990— Feb 1 12 
Feb 1 13'/4 
Mar 15 13^/4 



5'/4 



May 1 5'/4 
May 1 13 
Sept 1 103/4 



Oct 1 
1991— Feb 1 

Maturing 1991-92 
1991— May 1 
Oct 1 
Dec 15 
1992— Feb 1 



12'^ 
12'/^ 



14'/! 

18 

11 '/2 

15'A 



Maturing 1992-93 

1992— June 1 15 

July 1 15 

Sept 1 53/4 



14'/4 
13'/2 
123/4 
113/4 

ll>/4 



Maturing 1993-94 

1993— May 1 103/4 

June 1 15</4 

July 1 143/4 

Oct 15 113/4 



Dec 15 
1994— Mar 1 



11'/^ 
12 



Feb 1/78 J15 

Feb 1/83-Apr 27/83 J98 

Nov 14/84-Mar 19/85 .. H45 
Feb22/83-Mar 15/83 
July 12/83-Feb 1/85 
Feb 19/85 H2 

June 1/63 AT21 

Feb 1/64 CT9 

Oct 15/83-Nov8/83 

Dec 15/83 Hll 

Feb 15/71 F61 

Feb 21/84 H15 

Apr 1/84-May 1/84 

Aug 22/84-Sept 12/84 .. H20 



June 1/84-Junc 19/84 

July 11/84 H24 

Aug 1/84 H32 

Mar 1/81 J58 

Aug 15/79 J26 

Oct 1/79- July 1/80 

May 15/83- June 21/83.. J29 

Jan 7/85 H49 

Oct 1/84-Oct 24/84 H40 

Dec 15/79-Feb 1/80 
June 1/80-Aug 1/80 
Sept 27/83-Feb 1/84 

Mar 13/84 J33 

Nov 14/84-Mar 19/85 .. H43 

Mar 31/81 J60 

Mar 31/80 J38 



May 1/64- July 1/64 

Sept 1/65 CT12 

Apr 1/67 F12 

May 1/80 J41 

July 12/83-Feb 1/85 

Feb 19/85 H5 

Oct 1/80 J49 

Feb 1/81 J56 

May 1/81 J62 

Oct 15/81 J73 

Dec 15/84 H47 

Feb 1/82 J76 

June 1/82 J82 

July 1/82 J85 

Sept 1/66-Dec 15/66 

Feb 1/67 F6 

Sept 1/82 J88 

Oct 15/82 J91 

Nov 1/82 J93 

Nov22/82-Dec 15/82 

Aug 1/83-Sept 1/83 J95 

Feb 1/83-Mar 15/83 

Apr 27/83-July 12/83.... J99 



May 15/83-June 21/83.. H3 

June 1/81 J65 

July 1/81 J69 

Sept 27/83-Oct 15/83 

Feb 1/84 H8 

Nov8/83-Dec 15/83 

Feb 21/84 H12 

Mar 13/84 H17 



125,000,000 
500,000,000 



250,000,000 



625,000,000 250,000,000 
4,499.981.000 2.075.000.000 

100,000,000 
50,000,000 

625,000,000 
150,000,000 
200,000,000 

575,000,000 
1.125.000,000 575.000,000 



46,420,000 
200,000,000 


525,000,000 
150,000,000 
395,900,000 


775,000,000 


350,000,000 
325,000,000 


1,075,000,000 

642,000 

16,499,000 

2.113,561,000 


400,000,000 

592,270,000 

822,954,000 

3.561,124,000 


225,000,000 

125,000,000 

1,177,000 


1,783,170,000 


100,000,000 
10,547,000 

461,724.000 


450,000,000 

11,982,000 

417,000 

2,245.569.000 


411,000 
82,336,000 

76,431,000 
159.178.000 


644,000 
17,465,000 

225,000,000 
29,373,000 

272,482.000 


200,000,000 
6,000 


30,000 


225,000,000 

20,000 

400,000,000 

500,000,000 


30.000 


2,050,000,000 




1,850,000,000 
5,225.026,000 


60,000 


1,050,000,000 

83,070,000 

9,715,000 


622,000 
1,520,000 


1,025,000,000 




850,000,000 

225,000,000 

3.242.785.000 


2.142.000 



125,000,000 
500,000,000 
250,000,000 250,000,000 



875,000,000 250.000,000 
60.000 6,574.921.000 2.074.940.000 

100,000,000 
50,000,000 

625,000,000 
150,000,000 
200.000,000 

575,000,000 575,000,000 
1.700.000.000 575.000.000 



150,000,000 



175,000,000 
774.979,000 



625,000,000 
200,000,000 



825.000.000 



525,000,000 525,000,000 

150,000,000 150,000,000 

442,320,000 395,900,000 46,395,000 

200,000,000 



775,000,000 
350,000.000 
325,000.000 


350,000,000 
325.000,000 


.425,000,000 


1.075.000.000 
400.000,000 
592.912,000 
839.453.000 

5.674.685.000 


400,000,000 

592,270,000 

822,954,000 

3.561.124.000 


625,000,000 

642,000 

16,492,000 

1.113.529.000 


225,000,000 

125,000,000 

1,784,347,000 


1,783,170,000 


1,177,000 


550,000,000 

22,529,000 

417,000 

2.707.293,000 


450,000,000 

11,982,000 

417,000 

2,245.569,000 


100,000,000 
10,539,000 

Ill.7l6.000 


1,055,000 

99,801,000 

225,000,000 

105,804.000 

431.660,000 


644,000 
17,465,000 

225,000,000 
29.373.000 

272,482.000 


410,000 
23,824,000 

47,431,000 
71.665.000 


200,000,000 
36.000 


30.000 


1,000 


225,000,000 

50,000 

400,000,000 

500,000,000 


30,000 


20,000 


2,050.000,000 




950,000,000 


1,850.000.000 
5,225.086.000 


60.000 


900,000,000 
1.850,021,000 


1,050.000,000 
83,692,000 
11,235,000 


622,000 
1,520,000 


1,050,000,000 

73,060,000 

9,715,000 


1.025.000.000 




1,025,000,000 


850.000,000 

225,000,000 

3,244.927.000 


2.142.000 


850,000,000 

225,000,000 

3.232.775.000 



UNMATURED DEBT 
TABLE 11.2 

MARKETABLE ^O^DS— Continued 



11*5 



Maturity date 



Issue date 



Series April 1/1984 lssucs<'> Retirements*" March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Maturing 1994-95 
1994— Apr 1 13 Apr 1/84-May 1/84 

Aug 22/84 H21 

May 15 13y4 June 1/84-July 11/84 

Aug 1/84 H25 

June 15 91/! June I5/74-Ju!y 1/75 

Aug 15/75-June 1/76 

Aug 1/76-Apr 1/77 F85 

July 15 Wh June 19/84 H29 

Oct 1 12^/4 Sept 12/84 H39 

Dec 1 m Dec 1/67 F23 

Dec 15 \Vh Oct 1/84-Oct 24/84 H42 

1995— Febl \Vh Feb 1/85 H51 

Feb 1 12'/4 Nov 14/84-Mar 19/85 .. H44 
Marl 11% Dec 15/84 H48 

Maturing 1995-96 

1995— Apr 1 ll'/4 Feb 19/85 H54 

Oct 1 6'/! Oct 1/68 F33 

Oct 1 10 Oct 1/75-Dec 15/75 

Feb 1/76-Apr 1/76 F97 

Maturing 1996-97 

1996— Sept 15 3 Sept 15/36 PI 

Maturing 1997-98 

1997— May 15 91/4 May 15/77-Juiy 1/77 

Sept 1/77-Feb 1/78 J9 

1998— Mar 15 3% Sept 15/56 715^ 

Maturing 1999-2000 

1999— Oct 15 9 Oct 15/77-Dec 15/77 .... J13 

Dec 1 13'/! Dec 1/80 J53 

2000— Mar 15 13y4 Mar 3 1/80- Mar 1/81 

Mar31/81-Oct 15/82... J39 

Maturing 2000-01 

2000— July 1 15 July 1/81 J70 

Dec 15 9y4 Dec 15/78 J22 

2001— Feb 1 15y4 June 1/81-July 31/81 .... J66 

Maturing 2001-02 
2001— May 1 13 May 1/80-Oct 1/80 

Feb 1/81 J42 

Oct 1 9'/^ Oct 1/76-Dec 1/76 
Apr 1/78-May 15/78 

July 1/78 J2 

2002— Feb 1 8y4 Feb 1/77 J7 

Mar 15 15'/2 Mar 31/82-May 1/82 .... J79 

Maturing 2002-03 
2002— May 1 10 May 1/79-June 1/79 

July 15/79 J25 

Dec 1 5 11 1/4 Dec 1 5/79-July 1/80 

May 15/83 J34 

2003— Feb 1 \VU Feb 1/80-June 1/80 
Aug 1/80-Feb 1/83 
Apr 27/83-June 21/83 
July 12/83 J35 

Maturing 2003-04 

2003— Oct 1 91/2 Aug 15/78-Oct 1/78 J18 

2004— Febl WU Feb 1/79- Mar 15/79 

Mar 2 1/79- Aug 15/79 .. J24 

Maturing 2004-05 

2004— June 1 13'/2 Apr 1/84-May 1/84 H22 

Oct 1 10'/2 Oct 1/79 J30 

2005— Marl 12 Oct 15/83-Nov 8/83 
Dec 15/83-Feb 1/84 
Feb21/84-Dec 15/84 . . H9 



815.314,000 



125,000 



1,025.000,000 
1,200.000,000 



250,000,000 
475,000,000 



900,000,000 
375,000,000 
725,000,000 
475,000,000 
815.439.000 5.425.000.000 



100,000,000 

754,375,000 
854.375.000 

55,000,000 



1,074,000,000 

197,045,000 

1.271.045.000 

647,125,000 
400,000,000 

1,050,000,000 
2.097,125.000 

175,000,000 

571,875,000 

425,000,000 

1.171,875.000 



1,325,000,000 



1,468,375,000 
262,500,000 
350,000,000 

3,405.875.000 



1,850,000,000 
1,625,000.000 



2.700.000.000 
6.175.000.000 

819.000.000 

2.200.000.000 
3.019.000.000 



600.000.000 



375.000.000 



375.000.000 



550,000.000 



1.025.000.000 1.025.000.000 
1.200.000.000 1.200.000.000 



51.194.000 764,120,000 
250,000,000 
475,000,000 
125,000 
900,000,000 
375,000,000 
725,000,000 
475,000,000 

51.194.000 6.189.245.000 

375,000,000 
100,000,000 

44,625,000 709,750,000 
44.625.000 1.184.750.000 

55.000.000 



42.000.000 1.032.000,000 

197.045.000 

42.000.000 1.229.045.000 



25.375.000 



621.750.000 
400.000.000 



1.050.000.000 
25.375,000 2.071.750.000 

175.000.000 
21,875.000 550.000.000 

425.000.000 
21,875.000 1.150,000,000 



1.325.000.000 



1.411.500.000 
252.000.000 
350.000.000 
67.375.000 3.338.500.000 



56.875.000 
10,500.000 



1.850.000.000 
1.625.000,000 



2.700,000.000 
6.175,000.000 



31.500.000 787,500.000 

2.200.000.000 
31.500.000 2.987.500.000 



550.000.000 
600.000,000 



-51,194.000 
250,000,000 
475,000.000 

900,000,000 
375.000,000 
725.000.000 
475.000.000 
5.373.806.000 

375.000.000 



- 44.625.000 
330.375.000 



42.000.000 
42.000.000 

25.375,000 

25.375.000 

21.875.000 
21.875.000 



- 56.875.000 

- 10.500.000 

- 67.375.000 



400.000,000 



750.000.000 
1.150.000.000 



1.400.000,000 375,000.000 
2.000.000.000 925,000.000 



1.775,000,000 
2.925,000,000 



-31.500.000 

-31,500.000 
550.000.000 



375.000.000 1.400.000.000 
925,000,000 1.400.000.000 



11«6 
TABLE 11.2 

MARKETABLE BONDS— Concluded 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS. 1984-85 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 

Maturity date % Issue date Series April 1/1984 Issues*" Retirements"' March 31/1985 1985 1984 

~ $ $ $ $ $ $ 

Maturing 2005-06 
2005— Sept 1 12'/4 Aug 1/83-Scpt 1/83 

Sept 27/83 H6 1,000,000,000 1,000.000,000 1,000,000,000 

2006— Mar 1 12i/6 Mar 13/84-Nov 14/84 

Mar 19/85 H18 250,000,000 725,000,000 975,000,000 725,000,000 250,000,000 

1.250,000.000 725.000.000 1.975.000.000 725.000.000 1.250.000.000 

Maturing 2006-07 
2006— Oct 1 14 June 1/84- July 1 1/84 

Aug 1/84 H26 1,025,000,000 1,025,000.000 1,025,000.000 

2007— Mar 1 13y4 June 19/84 H30 325,000,000 325,000,000 325,000,000 

1.350.000.000 1.350.000.000 1.350.000.000 

Maturing 2007-08 

2007— Oct 1 13 Aug 22/84-Sept 12/84 .. H36 700,000,000 700,000.000 700,000,000 

2008— Mar 1 12y4 Oct 1/84-Oct 24/84 H41 750,000,000 750,000.000 750.000.000 

1.450,000.000 1.450.000.000 1.450.000.000 

Maturing 2008-09 

2008— Oct 1 liy4 Feb 1/85 H52 325.000.000 325.000,000 325.000,000 

Accounts without current transactions ' - 4,942,679,450 

Total marketable bonds (Canadian currency) 56,810.901.000 20.931.377,000 8.486.063.000 69.256,215.000 12.445,314.000 8.507.320.550 

Payable in foreign currencies — 

United States dollars — 

(3) 1985— Oct 1 8.2 Apr 1/78 319.025.000 21.875.000 340,900,000 21,875.000 9.750.000 

1986— Nov 3 16'/4 Nov 3/81 382.830,000 26,250.000 409,080,000 26,250.000 11,700,000 

(3) 1987— Oct 15 5 Oct 15/62 63.294,560 4.200.000 2.041.760 65,452,800 2,158,240 -44,960 

(3) 1988— June 1 6V» June 1/68 127,610,000 8,750,000 136.360.000 8,750,000 3,900.000 

(3) 1998— Apr 1 8H Apr 1/78 319,025,000 21,875,000 340,900.000 21,875.000 9,750.000 

(3) Oct 15 9'/4 Oct 15/78 446,635,000 30,625,000 477,260,000 30,625,000 13,650,000 

1.658.419,560 113.575.000 2.041.760 1,769,952.800 111.533.240 48.705.040 

Deutsche marks — 

1984— May 10 5 May 10/78 246,950,000 246.950,000 -246,950,000 -7,750,000 

1989_Apr30 m Apr 30/82 98.780.000 9.580,000 89,200,000 -9,580,000 -3,100,000 

345.730.000 256.530.000 89.200.000 -256.530.000 -10.850.000 

(3) 1989— Mar 20 3H Mar 20/79 178,560.000 26,496.000 152.064,000 -26,496,000 270.000 

1992— May 10 5'/4 May 10/84 113,360,000 7,760.000 105,600,000 105,600,000 

178.560,000 113,360,000 34,256,000 257,664,000 79.104,000 270,000 

Accounts without current transactions - 1,264.975,000 

Total marketable bonds (foreign currencies) 2.182.709.560 226.935.000 292.827.760 2.116.816.800 -65,892,760-1,226,849.960 

Total 58,993,610,560 21,158.312,000 8,778.890,760 71,373,031,800 12,379,421,240 7,280,470,590 

"> Issues and retirements of the marketable bonds payable in foreign currencies include the translation of these currencies to Canadian dollars using closing rates of 

exchange at March 31 . 
'^' Exchangeable at the option of the holder for an equal par value bond bearing the same interest rate. 
*'' Subject to redemption before maturity. 



Canada Savings Bonds 

Canada savings bonds are interest-bearing certificates of 
indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada, and have 
the following characteristics: 

— issued to Canadian residents; 

— issued in Canadian currency only; 

— registered in the name of the holder; 

— fixed dates of maturity; 

— not marketable; 



— redeemable on demand by the holder, with accrued inter- 
est calculated to the end of the previous month; 

— not subject to call before maturity; and, 

— term to maturity of seven years or more. 

Certain series of Canada savings bonds include provisions for 
cash bonuses payable at maturity. 

Table 11. 3 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for Canada savings bonds. 



UNMATURED DEBT 
TABLE 11.3 

CANADA SAVINGS BONDS 



1I'7 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 

Maturity date %'" Issue date Series April 1/1984 Issues Retirements March 31/1985 1985 1984 

s s s $ s s 

1984— Nov 1 WA 1972-73 S27 489,721,700 489.721,700 -489,721.700 -6.259,650 

1984— Nov 1 Wh 1975-76 S30 948,475.300 948.475.300 -948.475.300 -18.729,750 

1985— Nov 1 10'/!-ll'/4 1973-74 S28 266,904,650 3,664,300 263,240,350 -3,664.300 -4.454.750 

1985— Nov 1 Wh-\V/* 1976-77 S31 484,421,650 12,096.350 472.325.300 -12.096.350 -12.290.200 

1985— Nov 1 W/i-WA 1978-79 S33 3.064,154.300 178,976.600 2,885.177,700 -178.976.600 -128.544.900 

1986— Nov 1 10'/i-ll'/4 1977-78 S32 421,072.100 21,014.400 400.057,700 -21.014,400 -18,802,500 

1986— Nov 1 10'/6-ll'/4 1979-80 S34 2.168,065,200 147,388.700 2,020.676,500 -147,388,700 -106.663.400 

1987— Nov 1 10'/!-ll'/4 1980-81 S35 1,473,548,600 111,822.400 1.361.726.200 -111.822.400 -101,547.900 

1988— Nov 1 Wh-W/t 1981-82 S36 9.006.000,500 1.249,941.400 7,756.059.100 -1,249.941.400 -1,036,594.100 

1989— Nov 1 9'/4-10'/4-ll'/4 1982-83 S37 8,813,599,200 1.870,300,800 6.943,298,400 -1,870,300.800 -2,198,896,300 

1990— Nov 1 9'/4-10'/4-ll'/4 1983-84 S38 11,068.363,900 3.389,519,700 7.678,844.200 -3.389,519.700 11,068.363,900 

1991— Nov 1 111/4 1984-85 S39 12,773.881,137 595.856,131 12.178,025.006 12.178.025.006 

Account without current transactions - 1.872.253.300 

Total 38.204.327.100 12,773.881.137 9.018.777,781 41.959.430.456 3.755.103.356 5.563.327.150 

^'^ These rates include, for series S27, S28, S30 and S31, cash bonus provisions. 



Special Non-Marketable Bonds 

Special non-marketable bonds are interest-bearing certifi- 
cates of indebtedness issued by the Government of Canada 
exclusively to the Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund, and 
have the following characteristics: 

— not negotiable; 

— not transferable; 

— not assignable; 



— issued in Canadian currency only; 

— term to maturity of 20 years or less; 

— interest payable semi-annually; and, 

— redeemable at face value plus accrued interest. 

Table 1 1 .4 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for these special non-marketable bonds. 



TABLE 11.4 

SPECIAL NON-MARKETABLE BONDS 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



April 1/1984 Issues 

S S 

Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund — 

Maturing 1985-86 102,000 

1986-87 1,792.000 

1987-88 3.814,000 

1988-89 5,607,000 

1989-90 4.059,000 

1990-91 5,447,000 

1991-92 6,540,000 

1992-93 7.1 12.000 

1993-94 7.907,000 

1994-95 9,087,000 

1995-96 10,217,000 

1996-97 10,651.000 

1997-98 1 1.351.000 

• 1998-99 12.015.000 

1999-2000 17,709,000 

2000-01 22,971.000 

2001-02 17.622.000 

2002-03 17,414,000 

2003-04 17,259,000 

2004-05 16.661,000 

Total 188.676.000 16.661.000 



Retirements March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



102,000 
1,792,000 
3,814.000 
5,607,000 
4.059,000 
5.447,000 
6.540,000 
7,112.000 
7,907,000 
9,087,000 
10,217,000 
10.651,000 
11.351.000 
12.015.000 
17.709.000 
22.971.000 
17.622.000 
17.414.000 
17.259,000 
16,661,000 



16,661.000 



17.259,000 



205.337.000 



16.661.000 



17,259.000 



11-8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Treasury Bills 

Treasury bills are short-term certificates of indebtedness 
issued by the Government of Canada to pay sums of money on 
given dates, and have the following characteristics: 

— issued at a discount in lieu of interest payments; 

— common terms: 3 months, 6 months and 1 2 months; 

— issued in Canadian currency only; 

— transferable; and, 

— bought and sold on the open market. 

TABLE 11.5 

TREASURY BILL ISSUES AND REDEMPTIONS 

(in millions of dollars) 



Three-month and six-month bills are usually issued weekly, 
while other bills are issued every two weeks, usually for periods 
of one year or less. 

The balance at March 31, 1985 consists of $20,900 million 
in three-month bills; $21,150 million in six-month bills; and, 
$10,250 million in 364-day bills. 

Table 11.5 presents a monthly summary of Treasury bill 
issues and redemptions. 



April, 1984 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1985 

February 

March 

Balance at April 1, 1984 

Balance at March 31, 1985. 







Issues 






Redemptions 






3 month 


6 month 


Other 




3 month 


6 month 


Other 




Net 


bills 


bills 


bills 


Total 


bills 


bills 


bills 


Total 


change 


6,025 


2,900 


800 


9,725 


5,350 


2.800 


450 


8.600 


1.125 


6,050 


2,850 


800 


9,700 


5,600 


2,050 


450 


8.100 


1.600 


7,775 


3,775 


1,200 


12,750 


7,075 


2.400 


1,000 


10.475 


2.275 


6,250 


3,050 


800 


10,100 


6,025 


2.350 


600 


8.975 


1.125 


8,850 


4,000 


800 


13,650 


7,550 


3.425 


600 


11.575 


2.075 


6,950 


3,200 


800 


10,950 


6,275 


2,825 


600 


9.700 


1.250 


6,550 


3,200 


1,600 


11,350 


6,250 


2,900 


600 


9.750 


1.600 


6,850 


3,300 


1,150 


11,300 


8,850 


3,550 


1.700 


14.100 


-2.800 


6,350 


3,200 


800 


10,350 


6,950 


3.075 


600 


10.625 


-275 


6,600 


3,400 


800 


10,800 


6,550 


3.050 


625 


10.225 


575 


5,600 


3,250 


700 


9,550 


5,550 


3,200 


700 


9.450 


100 


8,700 


4,800 


800 


14,300 


7,650 


4,000 


700 


12,350 


1,950 


82,550 


40,925 


11,050 


134,525 


79,675 


35,625 


8,625 


123,925 


10,600 
41,700 



52,300 



Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation 
Inc to be Repaid by the Government 

The "Allowance for borrowings of agent Crown corpora- 
tions expected to be repaid by the Government" is reported 
under Other Liabilities in Section 9 of this volume and does 
not include the borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation 
Inc since Parliament already provided authority (Regional 
Industrial Expansion Vote 7c, Appropriation Act No. 4, 1984- 
85) to assume the debt of this Corporation. Therefore, $1,117 
million ($100 million payable in Canadian currency and 
$1,017 million payable in foreign currencies) of borrowings as 
at March 31, 1985 are reported separately in this section. 

Notes and Loans Payable in Foreign 
Currencies 

This account records borrowings by the Government of 
Canada under agreements with banks in Canada, United 
States, Switzerland, Japan and other international banks. 

Transactions during the year consisted of issues and retire- 
ments in United States dollars and Swiss francs, issues in 
Japanese yen, and valuations of all year-end balances. The 
balances at March 31, 1985 consist of: 



—$1,000,000,000 US ($1,363,600,000 Cdn) in one-month 
notes from American banks; 

—$400,000,000 US ($545,440,000 Cdn) in a one-month 
note from Canadian chartered banks; 

—$1,750,000,000 US ($2,386,300,000 Cdn) five year loans 
from international banks; 

—300,000,000 SF ($158,400,000 Cdn) three year loan, 
700,000,000 SF ($369,600,000 Cdn) five year loans, and 
200,000,000 SF ($105,600,000 Cdn) six year loan, from 
Swiss banks; and, 

—120,000,000,000 Yen ($653,400,000 Cdn) eight year 
loan, 31,150,000,000 Yen ($169,611,750 Cdn) ten year 
loan, and 35,000,000,000 Yen ($190,575,000 Cdn) 
twenty year loan, from Japanese banks. 

The foreign currency balances were translated into Canadi- 
an dollars using the year-end closing rates of exchange at 
March 31, 1985. 

Table 1 1 .6 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for the notes and loans payable in foreign currencies. 



UNMATURED DEBT 
TABLE 11.6 

NOTES AND LOANS PAYABLE IN FOREIGN CURRENCIES 



1I'9 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



Maturity date % Issue date April 1/1984 l5sues<'> Retirements<" March 31/1985 

s s s s 

United States dollars — 
Notes payable to — 

American banks various various 2,687,100,000 1,323,500,000 1,363,600,000 

Canadian banks various various 510,440,000 2,692,000,000 2,657,000.000 545,440,000 

1987— June 16 UVs June 16/82 957,075,000 65,625,000 1,022,700,000 

1988— Oct 27 10% Oct 27/83 638,050.000 43,750,000 681,800,000 

1990— Mar 22 \Vh Mar 22/85 685,500.000 3,700.000 681,800,000 

2.105.565.000 6.173.975.000 3.984.200.000 4.295.340.000 
Swiss francs — 

1985— Mar 14 3 Mar 14/79 297.600,000 297.600,000 

1987— Mar 8 VA Mar 8/82 238.080,000 26.880,000 211,200,000 

Nov 15 4% May 15/84 170.250,000 11,850,000 158,400,000 

1989— May 3 5H May 3/84 173.070,000 14,670,000 158,400,000 

1990— May 15 5i/« May 15/84 113.500,000 7,900,000 105.600,000 

535.680.000 456.820.000 358.900.000 633.600.000 
Japanese yen — 

(2) 1989— Feb 19 7.1 Feb 19/79 198,940,000 29,328.250 169.611,750 

<2) 1992— July 31 7.9 July 31/84 653,400,000 653.400.000 

"> 1999— Feb 19 V/2 Feb 19/79 198,940,000 8,365.000 190.575,000 

397.880.000 653.400.000 37.693.250 1.013.586.750 

Total 3,039.125.000 7.284,195,000 4,380,793.250 5,942,526,750 

<■> Issues and retirements include the translation of foreign currencies to Canadian dollars using closing rates of exchange at March 31. 
<^> Subject to redemption before maturity. 



1985 



1984 



1,363,600,000 




35,000,000 


510.440,000 


65,625,000 


29,250,000 


43.750,000 


638,050,000 


681.800.000 




2.189.775.000 


1.177.740.000 


- 297.600.000 


450,000 


- 26,880.000 


360.000 


158,400,000 




158,400,000 




105,600.000 




97.920.000 


810.000 


- 29.328.250 


17,850.000 


653,400.000 




- 8.365.000 


17,850.000 


615.706.750 


35.700.000 


2,903.401.750 


1,214,250.000 



Interest Rates 

Table n.7 sets out unmatured debt at March 31, for each of 
the years 1980-81 to 1984-85 inclusive, with the average rate 
of interest thereon. For purposes of comparison, unmatured 
debt is classified as to marketable bonds, non-marketable 



bonds (include Canada savings bonds and the Canada Pension 
Plan Investment Fund), Treasury bills, and notes and loans 
payable in foreign currencies. The borrowings of Canadair 
Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid by the Government are 
excluded from Table 1 1 .7. 



TABLE 11.7 

UNMATURED DEBT AS AT MARCH 31, FROM 1981 TO 1985, WITH THE AVERAGE RATE OF INTEREST 
THEREONc) 



Non-marketable bonds 

Canada 
Pension Plan 
Canada Investment 

Marketable bonds savings bonds Fund Treasury bills 

Average Average Average Average 

Amount interest Amount interest Amount interest Amount interest 
outstanding rate outstanding rate outstanding rate outstanding rate 

$ (millions) % $ (millions) % $ (millions) % $ (millions) % 

1985 71.373 11.76 41,960 11.25 205 10.81 52,300 10.89 

1984 58.994 11.55 38,204 9.85 189 10.59 41,700 9.94 

1983 :... 51,713 11.18 32.641 12.00 171 10.48 29,125 10.15 

1982 46,724 10.67 24.978 19.50 154 10.01 19.375 15.61 

1981 43.724 9.93 15.812 11.50 136 9.31 21,770 15.11 

Where various rates of interest are applicable, the interest rate in effect at March 31 is used. 

<'^ Excludes the borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid by the Government. 



Notes and loans 
payable in 

foreign 
currencies 



Total 
unmatured debt*" 



Average 
Amount interest 
outstanding rate 



Average 
Amount interest 
outstanding rate 



S (millions) 


% 


$ (millions) 


% 


5,943 


9.86 


171.781 


11.31 


3,039 


10.43 


142.126 


10.59 


1,825 


10.19 


115.475 


11.14 


1.122 


5.65 


92.353 


14.03 


1,707 


7.18 


83,149 


11.70 



II'IO 

Table 1 1 .8 shows the average high and low yields of Treas- 
ury bills, at tender, together with the average yield on the 
latest issues for the years 1980-81 to 1984-85 inclusively. 

TABLE 11.8 

TREASURY BILLS AVERAGE YIELDS AT TENDER 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 





High 


Low 


Last issue 


Year ended 
March 31 


% 


% 


% 


Three-month bills— 

1985 


13.01 


9.41 
9.02 
9.13 
14.34 
9.93 

9.49 
8.88 
9.00 
14.18 
10.11 

9.79 
8.91 
9.10 
14.35 
10.45 


10.40 


1984 


10.53 


10.53 


1983 

198.r 

1981 

Six-month bills — 

1985 

1984 


16.34 
20.99 

17.12 

13.81 
11.20 


9.17 
14.86 
16.44 

10.71 
11.00 


1983 

1982 

1981 

Other bills— 

1985 


16.82 
21.07 
16.65 

14.25 


9.52 
15.46 
14.85 

11.63 


1984 

1983 

1982 

1981 


11.67 
17.08 
20.59 
15.82 


11.67 
9.58 
15.61 
15.58 









Maturity of Government Debt 

Table 1 1 .9 presents total unmatured debt arranged in order 
of maturity. 



TABLE 11.9 

MATURITY OF GOVERNMENT DEBT 















Notes and 


Borrowings of 


















loans payable 


Canadair 












Canada 


Treasury 


in foreign 


Financial 








Marketable bonds 


savmgs 


bonds 


bills 


currencies 


Corporal 


tion Inc 


Total 














Average 




Average 


Average 




Average 




Average 




Average 






interest 




interest 


interest 




interest 




interest 




interest 


Maturity 


Amount 


rate 


Amount 


rateC) 


Amount rate 


Amount 


rate 


Amount 


rate 


Amount 


rate(2) 




$ (millions) 


% 


$ (millions) 


% 


$ (millions) % 


$ (millions) 


% 


$ (millions) 


% 


$ (millions) 


% 


1986 


5,399 


11.00 


3,621 


11.25 


52,300 10.89 


1,909 


8.95 


1.117 


various 


64.346 


10.87 


1987 


6,643 


13.95 


2.421 


11.25 




211 


7.25 






9.275 


13.09 


1988 


6,640 


11.79 


1,362 


11.25 




1,182 


13.10 






9,184 


11.88 


1989 


1,988 


9.74 


7,756 


11.25 




852 


10.12 






10.596 


10.88 


1990 


5,764 


12.14 


6,943 


11.25 




840 


10.39 






13.547 


11.58 


1991/95 


17,904 


11.87 


19,857 


11.25 




759 


7.51 






38.520 


11.47 


1996/2000,. 


5,359 


10.30 








190 


7.50 






5.549 


10.21 


2001/05 


16,576 


11.25 
















16,576 


11.25 


2006/09 


5,100 


12.89 
















5,100 


12.89 




71,373 


11.76 


41,960 


11.25 


52,300 10.89 


5,943 


9.86 


1,117 


various 


172,693 


11.31 


Less: Gov- 
























ernment's 
























own 
























holdings... 


62 


8.29 


199 


11.25 












261 


10.56 




71,311 


11.77 


41,761 


11.25 


52,300 10.89 


5.943 


9.86 


1.117 


various 


172.432 


11.31 



Note: this table includes unmatured debt issued by the Government of Canada. Borrowings of agent Crown corporations which are unconditional obligations of 

the Government, but not included in unmatured debt, can be found in Section 1 3 of this volume. 
<" The rates include cash bonus provisions which are part of certain series of Canada savings bonds. 
'^> Excludes the borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc to be repaid by the Government. 



SECTION 



12 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Other Accounts Reported 
on the Statement of 
Assets and Liabilities 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Cash in transit 12.3 

Cash 12.3 

Fixed assets 12.4 

Accumulated deficit 12.4 

Contingent liabilities 12.6 



OTHER ACCOUNTS REPORTED ON THE STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 



12'3 



OTHER ACCOUNTS REPORTED ON THE 
STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND 
LIABILITIES 

This section contains information on accounts reported on 
the Statement of Assets and Liabilities, which are not included 
elsewhere in this volume. These accounts are: 

— cash in transit; 

— cash; 

— fixed assets; 



— accumulated deficit; and, 
— contingent liabilities. 

Cash in Transit 

Table 1 2. 1 presents a summary of the balances and transac- 
tions for cash in transit. 



TABLE 12.1 

CASH IN TRANSIT 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



_ April 1/1984 

Cash in hands of collectors and in transit 

Moneys received after March 31 but applicable 
to the current year 

Total 1,876,475,686 



Credits 



Charges 



March 31/1985 



1985 



1984 



$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1,734,840,257 


1,734,840,257 


1,799,145.679 


1.799,145,679 


64,305.422 


-761,012,023 


141,635,429 


141,635,429 


83,416,166 


83,416.166 


-58.219.263 


71.548,314 



1.876.475.686 



1.882,561,845 



1.882,561,845 



6,086,159 



■689,463,709 



Cash in hands of collectors and in transit 

This account records public moneys received by public 
officers prior to April 1 , but not deposited to the credit of the 
Receiver General for Canada in the Bank of Canada, before 
that date. 



Moneys received after March 31 but applicable to the current 
year 

Public moneys received after March 31, but applicable to 
the year just ended, are recorded in this account. 

This account includes refunds of old year expenditure 
received prior to the closing of the accounts, and receipts to be 
credited to asset, liability, and (in exceptional cases) revenue 
accounts, where the omission of the credits in the old year 
would tend to make the accounting incomplete or inconsistent. 



Cash 

The Government's cash account represents public moneys 
on deposit at March 3 1 , to the credit of the Receiver General 
for Canada, with the Bank of Canada, chartered banks and 
other financial institutions. 

The cash position of the Government is affected not only by 
budgetary transactions, but also by non-budgetary, foreign 
exchange and unmatured debt transactions, all of which must 
be taken into account when considering the full scope of the 
Government's financial operations. 

Table 12.2 presents a summary of the balances and related 
transactions in current and special Receiver General deposits. 

The year-end balances denominated in foreign currencies 
have been translated into Canadian dollar equivalents at year- 
end closing rates of exchange. Foreign currencies held include 
United Kingdom pounds sterling. United States dollars, Bel- 
gian, Swiss and French francs, and West German marks. 



TABLE 12.2 
CASH 



April 1/1984 



Receipts 



Disbursements March 31/1985 



Net increase or decrease ( - ) 



1985 



1984 



Receiver General — 

Current deposits — 

Canadian dollars 6,329,000,000 

^ Foreign currencies 53,583,603 

Special deposits 29,712,473 

Total 6.412.296,076 



280,676,424.831 281.226,653.421 5.778,771,410 -550,228,590 2,136,302,293 

2,327,169,958 2,331.982.205 48.771.356 -4.812.247 25.907,749 

730,497,006 730,142,619 30,066,860 354,387 -328,746,361 



283,734.091.795 284,288.778,245 5.857,609,626 



554.686.450 1.833.463.681 



12-4 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Receiver General current deposits 

The monthly balances of Canadian dollar and foreign cur- 
rency deposits for the last five years are presented in the 
following tables: 

TABLE 12.3 

CASH IN CANADIAN DOLLAR DEPOSITS 
(in millions of dollars) 



Years ended March 3 1 



At end of 
month of 



1985 



1984 



1983 



1982 



Years ended March 3 1 



At end of 
month of 



1985 



1984 



1983 



1982 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 

October 

November . 
December . 

January 

February ... 
March 



50 
34 
33 
46 
44 
36 
15 
27 
41 
34 
24 
49 



16 
29 
35 
31 
42 
44 
42 
44 
35 
22 
15 
54 



42 
15 
33 
39 
34 
24 
27 
29 
48 
22 
22 
28 



9 
16 
26 
28 
21 
27 
24 
17 
55 
34 
34 
29 



1981 



April 3,611 5,483 3,118 3,281 1,922 

May 3,648 6,997 4,855 3,825 1,928 

June 2,716 4,787 5,124 2,102 1,108 

July 2,710 4,737 3,329 5,363 1,424 

August 1,664 3,191 2,126 4,068 2,406 

September 2,334 2,699 1,664 3,786 1,920 

October 2,796 3,643 2,879 3,671 3,325 

November 5,291 8,522 8,483 11,236 4,457 

December 3,325 7,300 7,476 7,532 4,138 

January 4,001 6,892 5,516 7,680 4,028 

February 5,691 6,460 4,636 6,278 4,061 

March 5,779 6,329 4,193 6,541 5,826 



TABLE 12.4 

CASH IN FOREIGN CURRENCY DEPOSITS 
(translated into Canadian dollars) 
(in millions of dollars) 



1981 



22 
23 
17 
28 
10 
22 
14 
27 
29 
37 
27 
49 



Receiver General special deposits 

These are balances in the hands of fiscal agents of the 
Government, for the purchase or redemption of Government 
securities, and for the payment of interest. 



Fixed Assets 

Fixed assets are tangible, durable items of value, including 
major additions or alterations thereto, from which benefits are 
expected to be derived during their useful lives. 

The fixed assets of the Government, which include land, 
engineering structures and works (such as canals, harbours 
and roads), buildings, and machinery and equipment, are 
charged to budgetary expenditure at the time of acquisition or 
construction, in accordance with the accounting policies of the 
Government of Canada which are described in Note 1 to the 
audited financial statements (Section 2 of this volume). Their 
existence, however, is acknowledged on the Statement of 
Assets and Liabilities by reporting them at the nominal value 
of$l. 

Accumulated Deficit 

The accumulated deficit is the account recording the net 
sum of annual deficits and surpluses of the Government of 
Canada since Confederation, together with certain amounts 
charged or credited directly to this account. The accumulated 
deficit is also equal to the excess of recorded liabilities over net 
recorded assets. 

A Statement of Accumulated Deficit is published in Section 
2 of this volume. 

A five year comparative statement of the accumulated 
deficit, in terms of total liabilities and net recorded assets, is 
presented as follows: 

TABLE 12.5 

STATEMENT OF ACCUMULATED DEFICIT IN 
TERMS OF TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET RECORD- 
ED ASSETS 

(in millions of dollars) 





Total 
liabilities 


Less: 

net 

recorded 

assets 


Accumu 


lated deHcit 


As at March 31 


Amount 


Increase or 
decrease ( - ) 


1985 


232,634 


41,186 
41,506 
41,557 
39,949 
37,198 


191,448 
154,531 
122,747 
98,758 
84,163 


36,917 


1984 


196,037 


31.784 


1983 


164,304 


23,989 


1982 


138,707 


14,595 


1981 


121,361 


13,018 



OTHER ACCOUNTS REPORTED ON THE STA TEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 



12*5 



The accumulated deflcit, in per capita terms and as a 
percentage of the gross national product, is shown in the 
following charts. 



7800 

7400 

7000 

6800 

6400 

6000 

5600 

5200 

4800 

4400 

4000 

3600 

3200 

2800 

2400 

2000 

1600 - 

1200 - 

800 - 

400 - 





ACCUMULATED 
DEFICIT 

Per Capita 

As at March 31 

Dollars 



3.46S 



4,942 



4.018 



^P 






6,162 



7.562 






40 



30 



20 



10 



27.S 



ACCUMULATED 
DEFICIT 

As a Percentage of 

Gross National Product 

As at March 31 

% 



M.« 



33.8 



44.7 



1981 



1983 



1984 



1985 



1981 



1982 



1983 



1984 



1985 



12*6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Contingent Liabilities 

A contingent liability is a potential liability which may 
become an actual liability when one or more future events 
occur or fail to occur. 

The Government of Canada as an accounting entity is 
defined as all the departments named in Schedule A of the 
Financial Administration Act; any division or branch of the 
Public Service of Canada, including a commission appointed 
under the Inquiries Act, designated by the Governor in Coun- 
cil as a department for purposes of the Financial Administra- 
tion Act; the staffs of the Senate, the House of Commons, and 
the Library of Parliament; and, any corporation named in 
Schedule B of the Financial Administration Act. Corporations 
listed in Parts I and II of Schedule C of the Financial 
Administration Act, and those Crown corporations that are 
not subject to the Financial Administration Act, are excluded 
from this definition. Information regarding contingent liabili- 
ties of Crown corporations can be found in Table 7.8 — 
"Contingent Liabilities of Crown Corporations", while details 
of their borrowings can be found in Table 7.4 — "Government 
of Canada Financial Interest in Crown Corporations". Some 



Crown corporations also operate insurance programs. Informa- 
tion regarding these insurance programs can be found in Note 
6 to the audited financial statements of the Government in 
Section 2 of this volume. 

The contingent liabilities of the Government comprise 
explicit guarantees by the Government, which include borrow- 
ings by other than Crown corporations, both from agent 
Crown corporations and from other than agents. Such explicit 
guarantees consist of guarantee programs of the Government, 
explicit guarantees by the Government for loans, financial 
arrangements and other potential liabilities, insurance pro- 
grams of the Government and other explicit guarantees. They 
also comprise potential losses arising from pending and threat- 
ened litigation relating to claims and assessments in respect of 
breach of contract, damages to persons and property, and like 
items. Pending and threatened litigation is reported in total in 
the following table. This table is also summarized in Note 4 to 
the audited financial statements of the Government in Section 
2 of this volume. 



TABLE 12.6 

STATEMENT OF CONTINGENT LIABILITIES 
AS AT MARCH 31, 1985 







Percentage 






of net claims 


Authorized 




to outstanding 


limit 




guarantees 


(where 


Contingent 


(where 


applicable) 


liability 


applicable)^') 



EXPLICIT GUARANTEES BY THE GOVERNMENT OF— 

Borrowings by other than Crown corporations — 
From agents — 
Loans to Indians by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and the Farm Credit 

Corporation, for on-reserve housing 250,000,000 

Loans to Nanisivik Mines Ltd by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, for the 

development of a town at Strathcona Sound, Baffin Island 4,570,000 

254,570.000 

From other than agents*^* — 
Guarantee programs of the Government — 

Canada Student Loans Act 3,185,738,617 

Small Businesses Loans Act 487,603,745**) 

Farm Improvement Loans Act 373,953,793'*) 

Advance Payments for Crops Act 200,000,000 

Enterprise development program and Canadian Industrial Renewal Board 587,049,400 

Fisheries Improvement Loans Act 29,108,571 

Regional Development Incentives Act 25,768,000'*) 

Financial obligations incurred by air carriers regarding The de Havilland Aircraft of Canada, 

Limited DHC-7 and DHC-8 aircraft 502,7 20,000<') 

Loans to Indians by approved lenders for on-reserve housing (*) 

Loans to foreign borrowers for goods or services purchased from Canadian exporters 

Indian economic development program 5,553,761 

5.397.495.887 
Other explicit loan guarantees — 

Loans to construct coal handling and terminal facilities by Ridley Terminals Inc 205,000,000 

Loans under the Atlantic Fisheries Restructuring Act 100,000,000 

Loans for the restructuring of Maislin Industries Ltd 1 1 ,590,600*^) 

Loans to the Arctic Co-operatives Ltd 4,410,000 

Loan to La Federation des Co-operatives du Nouveau-Quebec for the purpose of financing the 

purchase and transport of sealift supplies 1,785,000 

Loan to reactivate asbestos operations of Bale Verte Mines Inc 1,000,000 

Loans to the Ottawa Civil Service Recreation Association 2,000,000 

Loans for the financing of Cheticamp/Grand Entang Fishermen's Co-operative Society Ltd 360,000 

326.145.600 



72,169,965W 


8.5 


2,533,943 
74.703.908 




1,574,615,555 
401,200,362 
139,598,418 
96,681,683 
38,257,984**) 
14,079,904 
14,038,292 


3.6 

6.5 

.6 

13.8 
2.7 


128,382,392*^) 
126,769,786*2) 
18,656,000 
3,059,360*2) 
2.555.339.736 


3.1 
.5 

17.0 


199,497,189 
17,625,000 
1 1,590,600*')*') 
4,410,000 




1.362,683 

1,000,000 

562,500 

285,000 

236.332.972 





(S) 



(5) 



OTHER ACCOUNTS REPORTED ON THE STA TEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
TABLE 12.6 



12'7 



STATEMENT OF CONTINGENT LIABILITIES 
AS AT MARCH 31, 19S5— Concluded 



Authorized 

limit 

(where 

applicable) 


Contingent 
liability 


Percentage 

of net claims 

to outstanding 

guarantees 

(where 

applicable)") 



Insurance programs of the Government""' — 

Insurance against accidents at nuclear installations under the Nuclear Liability Act 750,000,000 

Accounts administered for the Government by the Export Development Corporation — Insurance and 

related guarantees 

Insurance under the Fishing Vessel Insurance PIan"^> 5,395,21 1 

755.395.211 

Other explicit guarantees — 

Guarantees under the Agriculture Products Co-operative Marketing Act 149,401, 0(X) 

Guarantee against damage or loss that may be occasioned by leased aircraft 

Guarantees against destruction or losses that may be occasioned by the rental or use of agricultural 

property for research purposes 40,0(X) 

149.441.000 

Total explicit guarantees 6,883,047,698 

PENDING AND THREATENED LITIGATION 

Total 



699,371, 658" ■> 

409,636,000 

358,493,000 

1.467.500.658 



149,401,000 
666,755<'> 

40,000 
150.107.755 

4,483,985,029 
3,724,043,007<7>"« 



1.0 



8,208,028,036 



"' Represents the average percentage over the most recent 5 years of net claims to the average amount of outstanding guarantees as at March 31, 1985. 

<^' Committed guarantees exist for the following loans to be made: to Indians for on-reserve housing, $26,764,846 — for Indian economic development, $69,162. At the 
reporting date, no loans had been issued for these amounts. 

<^' Letters of comfort have been issued by the Minister of Finance to the Bank of Canada with respect to funds advanced or guarantees provided by the Bank of 
Canada to the Bank for International Settlements (BIS). The letters pertain to BIS standby credit facilities in favour of the International Monetary Fund. The 
Government's potential liability at March 31, 1985 amounted to 180 million Special Drawing Rights ($178,4(X),000 US) while actual exposure amounted to 76 
million Special Drawing Rights ($75,300,000 US). 

^*^ The Act places limits on the maximum amount of guarantee for loans made by eligible lenders over different loan periods. The maximum amount of guarantee per 
lender is expressed in legislation as a percentage of aggregate loans made to qualified borrowers and varies depending upon the dollar value range of aggregate 
loans made by the lender. The authorized limits for given loan periods are included in the figure reported until all qualified loans made by all eligible lenders in the 
given periods are no longer outstanding, and are not adjusted for loan repayments nor payments made by the Government for guaranteed amounts in which default 
has occurred. 

<'> Less than. 1%. 

<*' Includes $4,139,360 attributable to the Canadian Industrial Renewal Board. 

(^> Amount denominated wholly or partially in a foreign currency and translated at the closing rate of exchange as at date of statement. 

<*' Authorized limit for loan guarantees for on-reserve housing totals $250,000,000 (shown above) for loans made by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 
the Farm Credit Corporation and other approved lenders. 

(" Maislin Industries Ltd was placed in receivership on July 11, 1983 and was declared bankrupt on October 19, 1983. To date, the Government has made interim 
payments totalling $18,500,000 US to creditors under a guarantee in the amount of $27,000,000 US. It is anticipated that the Company's assets will be liquidated 
by December 3 1 , 1 985 and that the Government will be called upon to make a payment of $6,500,000 US to settle remaining obligations to creditors at that time. 
""'Two agreements have been entered into with insurance companies under the credit reinsurance program. However, as at March 31, 1985, no loans have been 

reinsured under the agreements. The amount of reinsurance outstanding under the credit reinsurance program shall not exceed $600,000,000. 
"" There have been no claims under the Nuclear Liability Act since its inception in 1970. The Act covers 15 Canadian nuclear installations as at March 31, 1985. 
"^' The Fishing Vessel Insurance Plan is administered by the Government to insure fishermen against abnormal capital losses. A specified purpose account is credited 
with premiums, recoveries, and with advances to the account by the Government, such advances not to exceed $ 1 50,000 at any time. The account is debited with 
refunds of premiums and payments in settlement of third party vessel collision damage claims against fishermen, where the collision involves a vessel insured under 
the Plan. As at March 31, 1985, the insured value of vessels under the Plan amounted to $358,493,000; the balance of the account was $4,478,433 and outstanding 
claims against the account totalled $ 1 ,250,000. 
"') Includes $2.9 billion related to the administration of native statutory and treaty obligations by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. This 
amount represents plaintiffs' claims in 42 litigation cases. There are another 64 cases and settlements of Native Land claims currently under negotiation, for which 
amounts are not stated in the claims, and it is not possible to determine the amounts that may be ultimately payable. 



SECTION 



13 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Supplementary Information 
Required by the Financial 
Administration Act 



CONTENTS 

Page 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty 13.2 

Debts, obligations and claims written off or forgiven 13.45 

Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered .... 13.46 
Statement of all borrowing transactions on behalf of Her 

Majesty 13.61 

Losses of money or public property 13.61 



13'2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty 

Note: this information is required by Section 17(8) of the Financial Administration Act. 



ENERGY, MINES AND RESOURCES- 
NATIONAL ENERGY BOARD 

Order respecting the remission of the Transporta- 
tion Fuel Compensation Recovery Charge to ven- 
dors of Aviation Fuel to Foreign Air Carriers. 
Order-in-Council PC 1982—2955 dated September 
22, 1982: 



Chevron Canada Limited 

Gulf Canada Products Company 

Imperial Oil Limited 

Irving Oil Limited 

Kelly Western Services Limited 

Shell Canada Limited 

Total Energy, Mines and Resources . 



3,054 

22,162 

3,554,710 

193,004 

4,912 

2,582,576 

6,360,418 



NATIONAL DEFENCE 

Reimbursement of customs duties and taxes on 
early repatriation to Canada for Service reasons: 



Beauchamp J L A 1,013 

Comete J R 2,913 

Maillet J P M 1,173 

St Amand G D 3,143 

Remissions of less than $1,000 10,154 

Total National Defence 18,396 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE 

PC 1960—1600, November 25, 1960, customs 
duties and excise taxes ordinarily payable on goods 
purchased in or imported into Canada by the Gov- 
ernment of tne United States or its authorized agent 
on behalf of the Government, to be used in connec- 
tion with the United States Government projects, 
joint Canada-United States projects, or United 
States Government establishments in Canada: 



Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 75,787 

Canadian Coast Guard, St John's, Nfld 2,682 

Canadian General Electric Company, Toronto, Ont .... 144,535 

Canadian Marconi, Montreal, Que 2,432 

Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ottawa, 

Ont 1,169,015 

Department of National Defence, Vancouver, BC 22,799 

Department of Supply and Services, Toronto, Ont 3 29, 1 42 

EEV Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 10,269 

Electronic Wholesalers Limited, Ottawa, Ont 1 ,063 

ITT Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 101,003 

MA Electronics Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 8,669 

Metrone Corporation, Montreal, Que 10,421 



ROR Associates Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,020 

Raytheon Canada Limited, Waterloo, Ont 5,699 

SMI Support Measures Incorporated, Manotick, Ont .. 8,249 

Subtec Limited, Ottawa, Ont 1,581 

Thompson CSF Canada, Montreal, Que 1,1 17 

Transport Canada — Coast Guard, Vancouver, BC 31,959 

Transport Canada, St Lewis, Labrador 1,054 

Transport Canada, Trespassey, Nfld 3,083 

US Department of the Interior, Washington, DC 32,875 

Varian Canada Incorporated, Georgetown, Ont 1 1 ,01 3 

Westinghouse Canada Limited, Hamilton, Ont 2,707 

Westinghouse Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 9,548 

Remissions of less than $1,000 1,756 

1.990.478 

PC 1970 — 1913, customs duties and excise taxes 
on articles and materials for use in contracts under 
defence production and development sharing 
arrangements between the Government of Canada 
and the Government of the United States of 
America: 

A & G Muffler Manufacturing, Toronto, Ont 10,526 

A & M Non-Ferrous Metals Limited, Richmond, BC. 6,096 

Advance Power (1984) Incorporated, Bramalea, Ont .. 9,344 

Aircraft Applicances, Bramalea, Ont 97,894 

AMP of Canada Limited, Markham, Ont 3,882 

An — Jas Developments Limited, Mississauga, Ont 1,088 

Bachan Aerospace of Canada Limited, Emeryville, 

Ont 114,885 

Bata Engineering, Batawa, Ont 115,389 

Bell Aerospace Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont .... 597,1 12 

Bell Aerospace, Grand Bend, Ont 477,787 

Bell Northern Research, Islington, Ont 1,026 

Boeing of Canada Limited, Winnipeg, Man 42,512 

C— Tech Limited, Cornwall, Ont 141,202 

CAE Electronics, Montreal, Que 9,379 

Canada Forging, Welland, Ont 17,607 

Canadair, St-Laurent, Que 79,432 

Canadian General Electric Company, Toronto, Ont .... 1,470 

Cercast Incorporated, Montreal, Que 11,636 

Chicopee Manufacturing, Kitchener, Ont 33,553 

CHT Steel Company, Richmond Hill, Ont 145,410 

Collins Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 18,873 

Computing Devices Company, Ottawa, Ont 277,028 

Costalia Technologies Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 1,735 

Crawford Fittings (Canada), Niagara Falls, Ont 4,566 

Daf Indal Limited, Toronto, Ont 34,041 

Davie Shipbuilding Limited, Lauzon, Que 25,358 

Diemaco Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont 31,146 

Diemaster Tool Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 3,615 

Donlee Nuclear Division of Donlee, Weston, Ont 18,353 

Drew Manufacturing Limited, Mississauga, Ont 14,1 12 

Eastern Precision Casting, Montreal, Que 2,2 1 8 

Ebco Industries Limited, Richmond, BC 116,818 

Eldorado Resources Nuclear Limited, Port Hope, Ont 42,303 

Estampages RJ Compagnie, Montreal, Que 1,593 

Fathom Oceanology, Mississauga, Ont 4,319 

Fleet Industries, A Division of Ronyx Corporation, 

Fort Erie, Ont 620,082 

Garrett Manufacturing Limited, Toronto, Ont 8,830 

Gasco Manufacturing Limited, Toronto, Ont 28,681 

General Dynamics, Montreal, Que 52,834 

General Kinetics Engineering Limited, Mississauga, 

Ont 1,940 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*3 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



General Motors of Canada, London, Ont 9,226,000 

Gould Fasteners Limited, Mississauga, Ont 5,052 

Gruhie Manufacturing, Kitchener, Ont 4,920 

Hamworthy Canada Limited, St Catharines, Ont 1,217 

Hermes Electronics Limited, Dartmouth, NS 186,790 

Heroux Limited, Longueuil, Que 6,716 

Human Computing Resources, Toronto, Ont 1,317 

IP Sharp Associates Limited, Ottawa, Ont 9,097 

IP Sharp Associates Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,020 

Intera Environmental Consultants Limited, Calgary, 

Alta 3,056 

Joly Engineering, Montreal, Que 27,677 

Koppers Engineered Products, Rexdale, Ont 1,267 

Linamar Machine Limited, Ariss, Ont 365,592 

Litton Systems Canada Limited, Rexdale, Ont 244,338 

Magline of Canada Limited, Renfrew, Ont 19,142 

Magline of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,524 

Magna Electronics Limited, Scarborough, Ont 43,712 

Menasco Canada, St-Laurent, Que 2,307 

Microtel Limited, Brockville, Ont 30,725 

Novatronics of Canada Limited, Stratford, Ont 16,216 

Odean Machine Works Division MIC, Waterloo, Ont,. 12,526 

PC Drop Forgings Limited, Port Colborne, Ont 15,288 

Premco Machine Limited, Kitchener, Ont 7,152 

RDC Electronics Incorporated, Montreal, Que 1,075 

RJ Stamping, Montreal, Que 26,931 

Raychem Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 122,951 

Raytheon Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,031,01 1 

Regent Industries Limited, St-Hubert, Que 2,351 

Rockwell International of Canada Limited, Windsor, 

Ont 8,939 

Rockwell International, Toronto, Ont 6,160 

Science Applications, Ralston, Alta 2,577 

Scintrex Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,791 

Spar Aerospace Products Limited, Toronto, Ont 1 3,593 

Sperry Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 148,047 

Terminal Cable TC, Carignan, Que 9,524 

Textron Canada, Grandbend, Ont 104,586 

The Eldorado Tool and Manufacturing Company, 

Waterloo, Ont 2,348 

Triplex Engineering Company, Pointe-Claire, Que 250,797 

Versatile Vickers, Montreal, Que 1,288,750 

Vestshell Incorporated, Montreal, Que 1,281 

West Heights Manufacturing Incorporated, Kitchen- 
er, Ont 56,956 

Remissions of less than $1,000 8^475 

16,548.469 

Remission of excise duties on spirits lost due to 
breakage in warehouse and while in transit: 

British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch, Van- 
couver,' BC 15,952 

Hiram Walker and Sons Limited, Walkerville, Ont 2,786 

Manitoba Liquor Control Commission, Winnipeg, 

Man 2,351 

New Brunswick Liquor Corporation, Fredericton, NB 2,535 

Nova Scotia Liquor Commission, Halifax, NS 3,755 

Schenley Canada Incorporated, Valleyfield, Que 36,825 

Societe des Alcools du Quebec, Montreal, Que 53,804 

The Seagram Company Limited, Montreal, Que 1,003 

Remissions of less than $1,000 4,049 

123.060 



Remission of excise duties on grain or food source 
spirits other than wine for shipment from distillers 
to Licensed Bonded Manufacturers (Wine): 

S 

Gooderham and Worts Limited, Toronto, Ont 319,457 

Great West Distillers Limited, Vancouver, BC 1,916,647 

Hiram Walker and Sons Limited, Winfield, BC 56,751 

Les Distilleries Dumont Limitee, Rougemont, Que 1,208,606 

Les Vins Andre du Quebec Limitee, St-Hyacinthe, 

•Que 225,654 

McGuinness Distillers Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,540,121 

Melchers Incorporated, Berthierville, Que 1,539,433 

Melville Distilleries Limited, Laval, Que 162,584 

Potter Distilleries Limited, Langley, BC 1 1,581 

Reider Distillery Limited, Grimsby, Ont 3,248,442 

St-Lawrence Starch Company Limited, Mississauga, 

Ont 11,859.421 

The Seagram Company Limited, Montreal, Que 567,752 

23.656.449 

Remission of customs duties and excise taxes in 
excess of that payable on 1/1 20th of the value of 
various vessels and aircraft for each month or por- 
tion thereof they remained in Canada: 

Arctic Transportation Limited 3,675,173 

Armada 1984 234,033 

Balder Offshore Canada Incorporated 1 6,039,000 

Buffalo Point Development Corporation Limited 1 2,968 

CIL 2,618,000 

CN Marine 828,667 

Catre Industries Limited 50,084 

Construction Aggregates Limited 3,303,490 

Crosbie Offshore Services 1,735,417 

Diffusion Plein Vent Incorporated 36,875 

Dow Chemical of Canada Limited 6,004,170 

Esso Resources Canada Limited 6,444,550 

Fednav Limited 4,440,904 

Fondation Boscoville 147,041 

Geophysical Service Incorporated 965,098 

Gulf Oil Canada Limited 165,303 

Imperial Oil Limited 298,988 

Manchester Liners Services (Canada) Incorporated .... 2,458,333 

Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro 1,573,155 

Noranda Sales Group Corporation Limited 4,577,186 

SDS Drilling 6,336,457 

Secunda Marine Services Limited 4,956,315 

Societe Radio-Canada 66,069 

Stolt— Nielsens Rederi A/S 3,569,445 

Volker Stevens Dredging and Services Canada Lim- 
ited 1,157,813 

Western Geophysical 943,313 

Western Pulp Limited 64,706 

Wolf Offshore Transport Limited 4,246,250 

76.948.803 

PC 1953—18/894, June 9, 1953, remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes on importations of 
non-duty paid locomotives and miscellaneous rail- 
way equipment used temporarily in Canada by rail- 
way companies during the year 1984-85: 



Burlington Northern Railway . 
Canadian National Railway ... 



284,635 
364,497 



i- 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



Canadian Pacific Railway 

Chessie System Railroads 

Consolidated Rail Corporation 

Napierville Junction Railway 

Partial remission of customs duties, sales and 
excise taxes paid on domestic and imported parts, 
equipment, materials and commissary and passenger 
convenience items for use by Canadian air carriers 
providing domestic and international air service to 
the public: 

Air Canada, Winnipeg, Man 

Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited, Vancouver, BC... 

Nordair Limitee, Montreal, Que 

Pacific Western Airlines Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Wardair Canada (1975) Limited, Toronto, Ont 



3,357,322 

907,032 

66,858 

58,229 

5,038.573 



1,055,384 

740,234 

22,045 

32,052 

107,218 

1.956,933 



Remission of customs duties in respect of certain 
motor vehicles and in respect of parts and accesso- 
ries and parts thereof for such vehicles: 

American Motors Canada Limited, Brampton, Ont 40,31 1,991 

International Harvester Company of Canada Limited, 

Hamilton, Ont 26,682,514 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 14,978,425 

Western Star Trucks Incorporated formerly White 
Motor Corporation of Canada Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 3,644,085 

85.617.015 
Remission of duties and tax in excess of that 
payable on l/60th of the value of certain goods for 
each month or portion thereof they remain in 
Canada during the year 1984-85 and where in all 
cases the amount was not less than $25: 

126448 Canada Incorporated 1,091 

99M Corporation 4,339 

A — Z Complete Distributors Incorporated 1,309 

ADP Dealer Services Limited 3,814 

AES Data 18,582 

AIM Electronica Incorporated 1,532 

AM Look Canning Corporation 4,645 

AP Green Refractories 7,124 

APO Canada Limited 1,71 1 

A B Chance Corporation of Canada Limited 15,063 

ABC Circle Film 8,642 

Abex Industries of Canada Limited 10,467 

Accent Home Products Limited 44,084 

Accu Systems Limited 9,069 

Accuracy of Canada 1,089 

Accury of Canada 10,696 

Ace Controls Incorporated 1,556 

Acier et Accessoire Matador Canada Incorporee 3,080 

Acme Lacley Incorporated 2,205 

Acme Vacuum Cie Limitee 1,463 

Acrison Incorporated 1,033 

Action Color Concentrates Incorporated 1,371 

Acumen Software 3,046 

Acuson Mountainview 49,944 

Adamson, Stephan 2,194 

Adcom Electronics Limited 21,476 

Advance Boring and Jacking Systems 29,170 

AEL Microtel Limited 13,281 



$ 

Aero Flo Manufacturing 1,297 

Aerospatiale Helicopter Corporation 2,352 

Agatronics Limited 4,386 

Agrico Canada Limited 8,308 

Aim Electronics 7,010 

Aimco Limited 1,490 

Air Canada 58,419 

Air India 5,068 

Air King Limited 30,421 

Air Liquid Canada Limited 7,947 

Air Lock Plastics Limited 5,548 

Air Products and Chemicals Incorporated 4,160 

Air Products Division of Stearns Catalytic Limited 47,441 

Airtron Assembly 2,349 

Ajax Magnethermic Canada 1,268 

Akhurst Machinery 5,444 

Akron Manufacturing Corporation 5,569 

Aladdin Western Export Corporation 6,919 

Albarrie Canada Limited 6,170 

Alberta Energy Company Limited 43,890 

Alberta Government Telephones 52,750 

Albion Films 35,334 

Albion Films Limited 1 1,182 

Alcan Canada Products Limited 20,849 

Alexander Tools Limited 70,316 

Alexandra Tools 2,180 

Allen — Bradley Canada Limited 14,881 

Allen Crawford Associates Limited 6,022 

Allen Luftig Company, The 3,041 

Allibert Industries Limited 5,355 

Allied Chemical Canada Limited 1,963 

AUis Chalmers Canada Incorporated 6,450 

Almega Corporation 1,371 

Alpine Products Corporation 1 1,729 

Aluminium Company of Canada Limited 1,050 

Amca International 1,395 

Amdahl Limited 31,323 

Amerada Minerals Corporation of Canada Limited .... 3,754 

American Can Canada 1,255 

American Defribator 12,639 

American Digital Systems Incorporated 13,130 

American Drag Boat Association 1,928 

American Hospital Supply 2,008 

American Motors Corporation 5,095 

American Superior Electric Company 2,775 

Amerock Incorporated 33,942 

Ametron Western Hemisphere Incorporated 6,759 

AMF Canada 9,577 

AMF Tuboscope Company 47,495 

Amigo Sales International Incorporated 1,197 

Amoco Canada Petroleum Company Limited 34,189 

Amos Mitchell and Association Limited 14,240 

Amsco Canada Division Ingram and Bell Limited 6,060 

Amway of Canada 26,666 

Analytech Components Incorporated 3,044 

Anchor Industrial 2,1 15 

Andre Beausejour 12,656 

Andrew Antenna Company Limited 32,321 

Anglo Canadian Scientific 32,252 

Ann Arbour Computer Division Jervis B Webb 2,398 

Aoco Limited 1,270 

Apollo/Dorchester Electronics Limited 5,201 

Applied Electronics Limited 32,778 

Aptec Engineering Limited 28,101 

Aquachem Distributors 3,000 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*5 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Co/i///iMe</ 

$ 

Aquatec Limitee 4,812 

Arachnae Management Limited 1,364 

Arbell Incorporated 2,51 1 

Arctec Canada Limited 3,916 

Ariel Computer Products Limited 1,545 

Arlington Food Industries 6,454 

Armak Chemicals 10,785 

Armatec Controls Incorporated 2,966 

Armet Industries 2,027 

Armstrong Holdings 2,526 

Armstrong World Industry 27,646 

Aro Canada Limited 1,691 

Artco Incorporated 3,877 

Artec Nfld Limited 2,537 

Arvin Automotive 2,660 

Asarco Exploration Company 1,708 

Asco Canada Limited 3,163 

ASEA Limited 12,916 

Associated Mills/Dawson Warehouse 2,125 

Associated Tube Limited 10,576 

Astor Limited 21,616 

AT&T International Canada Incorporated 1,068 

Atco Metals 2,609 

Atelco Incorporated 62,785 

Atlas Copco Jarvis 63,290 

Atlas Polar Company Limited 9,509 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 1 1,778 

ATS Automation Tooling Systems Incorporated 1,290 

Audio Analyst 158,793 

Auto Tote Limited 3,101 

Autocall Division of Federal Signal Corporation 1,430 

Avatar Technology 1,694 

Aviation Electric Limited 12,493 

Avon Products of Canada Limited 22,830 

Axelson Incorporated Division US Industries 1,637 

B and D Engineering Sales 7,901 

B and G Controls Limited 2,377 

B and S Rotary Drilling Corporation 1 8,729 

BC Forest Products 4,967 

BC Hydro and Power Authority 14,540 

BC Telephone 25,488 

BC Television 12,910 

BC A Cooperbiomedical Incorporated 1,044 

BCL Magnetics Limited 2,883 

BD Wait Company Limited 75,139 

BF Goodrich Canada Limited 6,074 

BH Chemicals Canada Limited 2,541 

Babcock and Wilcox Industries Limited 21,159 

Baby Tyme Products Limited 6,666 

Babytime Products 6,063 

Bachan Aerospace of Canada Limited 1,174 

Baker Instruments Division of Richardson Vicks Lim- 
ited 8,916 

Bally Export 3,508 

Bally Refrigeration 6,952 

Bandag Canada Limited 27,997 

Banque Nationale de Paris 1,196 

Barata Construction Corporation Limited 10,795 

Barber Colman of Canada Limited 6,070 

Barber Engineering and Controls 8,204 

Barr and Murphy Canada Limited 2,755 

Barringer Research Limited 4,506 

Barry's Dairy Centre Limited 1,921 

Base Ten Canada Limited 1,127 

Basic Software Group 13,336 



Bates Ted Advertising 1,054 

Bau — Val Incorporated 14,732 

Bausch and Lomb Canada Incorporated 10,242 

Bay Concrete Products Limited 3,736 

Bayer Canada Limited 1,828 

Bayly Engineering Limited 3,692 

Bear Automotive Incorporated 3,021 

Bearskin Lake Air Services 1,182 

Beaver Engineering Limited 1,003 

Becker Brothers Farms 3,672 

Beckley, Chet 3,032 

Beckman Instruments Incorporated 12,625 

Bel Construction Limited 6,562 

Bell Aerospace Canada Textron Division Textron 

Canada Limited 1,085 

Bell and Howell Limited 6,784 

Bell Canada 15,078 

Bell Helicopters Limited 2,702 

Bell Northern Research Limited 13,906 

Beloit Canada Limited 46,030 

Bendix Heavy Vehicles 2,238 

Beneke Industries Limited 3,290 

Bennett and Emmott 1,602 

Benthas Incorporated 1,961 

Bepex Incorporated 10,607 

Bermarine Incorporated 5,522 

Bestpipe Incorporated 20,133 

Betacom 1,594 

Big Foot Computing Limited 3,473 

Billy Graham Crusade of BC 1,658 

Binder Tool and Mold Incorporated 10,909 

Bingham- Williamette Limited 11,499 

Binks Manufacturing 3,905 

Binney and Smith Canada Limited 19,877 

Bio Research Laboratory 4,889 

Blachford HL Limited 5,103 

Black and Decker Canada Incorporated 1,480 

Blackstone Industrial Products Limited 52,822 

Blue Ridge Lumber 5,745 

Bluewater Association 42,421 

Bobst Canada Incorporated 3,767 

Bochringer Mannheim 4,276 

Boise Cascade Canada Limited 44,987 

Bolt Beranek and Newman 4,053 

Bombardier Incorporated 8,925 

Bonar Packaging Company 1,826 

Booth Aquatic Research 8,779 

Bosch Robert (Canada) Limited 3,261 

Bourdeau Brothers 2,032 

Bow Plastics Limited 45,306 

Brandner, Richard 2,197 

Brian Engineering 2,599 

Bristol Aerospace Limited 2,965 

Bristol Meyers Limited 5,052 

British Broadcasting Corporation 4,667 

Broadcast Video System Limited 3,857 

Broackway Imco Canada 23,337 

Brotherly Love 2,601 

Brown Boggs Foundry and Machine Company Lim- 
ited 4,061 

Brown Boveri Canada 42,443 

Brown Offshore Limited 2,830 

Bruce Allen Talent 84,501 

Bruel and Kjaer Canada 30,287 

Buckhorn Canada Material Handling Products 33,978 



13-6 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Bucyrus — Erie Company of Canada Limited 8,223 

Buffalo Point Development Corporation Limited 12,968 

Bulliwant Food Equipment 3,750 

Burdny Incorporated L325 

Burlington Die Castings Limited 4,333 

Burroughs Canada 8,237 

Business Air Services Limited 7,204 

Butler Metal Products Company Limited 2,092 

Butler Polymet 28,698 

Byron Jackson Division of Borg Warner Canada Lim- 
ited 15,291 

CAE Electronic 19,308 

CAE Morse Division CAE Electronics Limited 3,898 

CE Natco Limited 1,914 

CE Refractories Division of RI Ramtite Limited 3,335 

CE Vetco Pipeline Services 58,1 13 

CFRB Transmitter Limited 5,919 

CHCH TV Limited 6,464 

CIL Industries 2,563 

CKCOTV Limited 10,860 

CPF Dualam Limitee 28,826 

CPR 181,742 

CSP Foods Limited 2,614 

CTH Instruments 1,038 

Cabelka and Sons Harvesting 8,462 

Cable TV 2,622 

Cablesystems Engineering 2,787 

CAD Systems Corporation 2,601 

Cadlinc 4,637 

CAE Machinery 2,055 

Calcutron Corporation 13,060 

Calgary Christian Centre 4,150 

Calgary Photo Distributors Limited 5,01 1 

Caligo Incorporated 7,314 

Caltec Scientific 1,655 

Camoplast Incorporated 107,807 

Campbell Soup Company Limited 4,478 

Can ISK Computer Systems Incorporated 5,133 

Can — Am Containers Limited 12,032 

Can Con Gas Services Limited 2,209 

Can Max Software Development 1,406 

Canada Casting Incorporated 1,389 

Canada Cement LaFarge 1 1,596 

Canada Centre for Inland Waters 3,310 

Canada Forge Limited 4,228 

Canada Metal Company Limited 1,660 

Canada Packers 18,748 

Canada Post 1,441 

Canada West Inspection Services 6,278 

Canada Wire Cable Limited 3,927 

Canada's Wonderland Limited 10,675 

Canadair Limited 115,116 

Canadian ASE Limited 1,147 

Canadian Auto Parts 1,840 

Canadian Auto Parts Toyota Limited 4,807 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 108,753 

Canadian Ceramic Wholesalers 1,529 

Canadian Cinegraph 22,194 

Canadian Coast Guard 10,340 

Canadian Coleman Company 3,620 

Canadian Construction Contracts 9,864 

Canadian Dynamics Nova Limited 3,522 

Canadian Fertilizers Limited 16,682 

Canadian Forest Products 2,005 



$ 

Canadian General Electric Company Limited 106,265 

Canadian Liquid Air 77,397 

Canadian Marconi 6,501 

Canadian Meter Company Limited 1,547 

Canadian National Railways 49,431 

Canadian NDE Technology Limited 6,488 

Canadian Opera Company 154,782 

Canadian Oxy Chemicals Limited 2,109 

Canadian Pacific Airlines 531,466 

Canadian Pacific Railways 7,821 

Canadian Patent Scaffolding 1,199 

Canadian Refractories 1,235 

Canadian Ski Association 25,315 

Canadian Software Development 1,538 

Canadian Thermos Limited 26,31 1 

Canadian Totalisator Company Limited 205,316 

Canameque Equipment Company Limited 15,565 

Cancoppas Limited 9,263 

Canderel 2,780 

Cangeo Limited 5,583 

Canology Group Incorporated 4,856 

Canon Canada Incorporated 7,475 

Canplas Industries Limited 36,652 

Canron Limited 9,351 

Cansel Survey Equipment 2,738 

Cantebury Coffee Corporation 2,090 

Cantect Corporation 1,316 

Cantex Drilling and Exploration 6,142 

Cantex Engineering 2,237 

Cantrols Equipment Limited 4,068 

Cape Breton Development Corporation 2,190 

Capilano Plastics Company Limited 93,083 

Capital Plastics 1,099 

Capwell Plastics Limited 22,939 

Cardion DGl 5,267 

Carey Enterprises Limited 1,379 

Carl Zeiss Canada Limited 26,980 

Carlew Chemicals Limited 1,838 

Carling O'Keefe 3,580 

Carpet Clinic 3,510 

Carrier Canada Limited 37,905 

Carrier Corporation 20,736 

Carsen W Limited 1,234 

Carson Products 9,695 

Cascade Fertilizers Limited 5,430 

Cascade Hydraulics (Canada) 2,854 

Cascade Incorporated 69,438 

Case Boring Corporation 17,577 

Case Keyboard Corporation 2,883 

Case JL 2,047 

Catec Representatives 1,852 

Catelli Limited 2,701 

CCH Canada Limited 1,762 

Center Tool and Mould Company Limited 8,522 

Centoco Manufacturing Limited 3,126 

Central Product England 1 1,362 

Central Productions 6,461 

Central Stampings Limited 10,828 

Central Trust 1,013 

Centre de Recherche pour la Defense 1,838 

Centrilift Canada Limited 5,007 

Ceram SNA Incorporated 7,121 

Cesco — Adio of General Tire 3,678 

CFCF Incorporated 3,740 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*7 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

CFCF TV 1,993 

Champion Road Machinery Company Limited L340 

Champion Spark Plug Company of Canada Limited .... 3,697 

Chandos Record 6,587 

Chapman Industries Limited 3,169 

Charles River Canada 1,402 

Chartoff Productions Limited 74,223 

Chartpak Canada Incorporated 1,304 

Chas Tennant and Company 13,657 

Ched Radio 1,602 

Chedd — Angier Productions Corporation 6,725 

Chemetics International Limited 3,360 

Chemical Leaman Tank Lines Incorporated 8,382 

Chemical Services Incorporated 3,490 

Cherney Mills Incorporated 4,298 

Chevron Chemical (Canada) Limited 5,182 

Chevron Pipeline Company 1,550 

Chi Corporation 1,019 

Chinook Industrial Supplies Limited 1,303 

Christenson Diamond Products Limited 3,280 

Christie Brown and Company Limited 15,819 

Chrysler Canada Limited 103,153 

Churchill Falls (Laboratory) Corporation 1,127 

Cimbria Holdings 5,653 

Cincinnati — Milacron Canada Limited 3,650 

Cinemage 46,892 

Circle Productions Limited 28,390 

Circo Craft 1,743 

Cissco/Can Industries Supply and Service 13,367 

City of Calgary Purchasing Department 16,184 

Cityof Regina 16,249 

Clairol Canada 4,794 

Clan of the Cave Bear Productions 63,609 

Clark Equipment of Canada Limited 7,414 

Claude Heroux 1,009 

Clawson, Tim 2,733 

Clay Mill Technical Systems 4,030 

Clays, Mark 6,781 

Clayton Environmental Consultants Limited 3,218 

Clyde Amca International 1,066 

CN — CP Telecommunications 2,616 

Coast Air Conditioning 2,415 

Cobre Timber Limited 1,308 

Coffeen Anderson Fricke 10,935 

Coldstream Products 1,348 

Cole Division Litton Business Equipment Limited 3,375 

Coleco Canada 222,021 

Colgate — Palmolive Canada 1,032 

CoUingwood Shipyard 1,124 

Collins Canada Division 33,191 

Colson Canada Limited 4,614 

Columbia Computing 6,578 

Columbia Frame Incorporated 23,839 

Columbia Pictures Corporation 3,666 

Combustion Engineering Superheater Limited 16,152 

Comdiaco Canada Limited 3,286 

Comdisco Incorporated 1,643 

Cominco Limited 16,604 

Comlink Systems Incorporated 2,178 

Commodore Business Machines Limited 1,350 

Commonwealth Construction Company 37,761 

Communications Technology Canada Limited 21,534 

Compaq Computers Limited 2,554 

Compu — Service Canada Limited 21,269 



$ 

Computer Accessories Corporation 23,878 

Computer Aided Design Systems 4,057 

Computer Sided Design Systems Incorporated 5,657 

Computervision Canada Limited 59,081 

Computrex Centres Limited 2,367 

Comtest Communications Products Limited 12,076 

Concept Resources 4,739 

Concert Productions 68,629 

Concord Carpet Care 1,938 

Concordia Construction 13,791 

Conde Nast Publications 1,022 

Consolidated Bathurst Incorporated 1,321 

Consortium GLX 12,826 

Consumer Glass Company 2,870 

Continental Canada Company 21,273 

Contiotech Measurements Systems Limited 1,062 

Contro Valve Equipment 1,694 

Control and Metering Limited 5,150 

Control Lighting Limited 9,164 

Cooper Energy Services Limited 8,660 

Cooper Lab Limited 9,436 

Corporation of the City of Halifax 8,472 

Corrosion Service Company Limited 2,575 

Cosa Corporation of Canada Limited 9,769 

Crawford Allan Associates 194,503 

Crawford, John 4,642 

CRC Canada Limited 74,519 

Creative Talent Limited 13,430 

Creative Workshop Limited 1,929 

Cresent Cheese 1,435 

Cronin Fire Equipment Limited 4,091 

Crouse Hinds Canada Limited 22,207 

Crowder Communications Limited 5,880 

Crown Controls Manufacturing Company 5,550 

Crown Forest Industries Limited 1,755 

Crows Nest Resources 1,953 

CTH Electronics 1,133 

Cullen Canadian Incorporated 2,538 

CuUen Detroit Diesel Allision 1,243 

Cummins Mid Canada Limited 1,620 

Cummins Quebec 2,331 

CWS Corporation 33,168 

CX Systems 4,387 

Cyanamid Canada 11,688 

DBM Reflex Enterprises 8,429 

DGH Television Systems Limited 2,687 

DMA Industries Inc 4,802 

Daal Specialties Canada Limited 24,206 

Dahms Schultz 1,029 

Dairy Producers 1,025 

Dale Payne and Associates Limited 7,901 

Dalton Fenske and Friends 18,541 

Danger Bay Productions 1,685 

Danoco Enterprises Limited 1,148 

Dare Foods Limited 17,009 

Darome Canada 1,857 

Data General (Canada) Limited 4,274 

Data Terminal L066 

Datagram L871 

Davey Tree Expert Company of Canada Limited 1 6,072 

Davis Canada Engineering Products 1,149 

Davis Standard Incorporated 1,092 

Daymond Division/Redpath 2,042 

DBL Data Brokers Limited 2,290 



13*8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Dc Havilland Aircraft of Canada Limited 37,567 

Dealer Service Systems 5,625 

Deane Compagnie 2,219 

Degroot John Association 7,759 

Del Lee Golf Canada 1,497 

DeLaval Turbine Canada Limited 5,882 

Dellner Couplers Limited 1,204 

Deloro Stellite Canada Limited 3,070 

Delphax Systems 4,279 

Delta Enterprises Sarnia Limited 3,753 

Dennis D Kiselbach Limited 9,678 

Department of Agriculture 1,838 

Department of Energy Mines and Resources 30,024 

Department of Environment 3,053 

Department of Fisheries and Oceans 39,214 

Department of National Defence 73,997 

Department of Supply and Services 15,882 

Department of Transjwrt 21,581 

Dero Enterprises Limited 7,238 

Desa Industries Limited 10,827 

Detector Electronics Canada 1,031 

Detroit Edison Company 3,403 

Deutah Company 1,456 

Dexter, Harry 4,185 

Diasonics Incorporated 7,758 

Dicomed Canada 2,936 

Digi Dyne Incorporated 6,493 

Digiseis Exploration Incorporated 7,171 

Digital Development Corporation 1,486 

Digital Equipment of Canada Limited 1 38,829 

Digital Interfaces Limited 1,926 

Digital Resources Incorporated 3,094 

Digital Telecommunications Limited 2,863 

Disco Incorporated 2,517 

Dix Performance Limited 6,715 

Doall Canada Limited 51,016 

Doble Engineering Company 4,049 

Domain Communications Incorporated 7,946 

Dome Petroleum Limited 25,799 

Domglas Incorporated 1,361 

Dominion Blue Line 1,619 

Dominion Bridge Company 6,919 

Dominion Forge Company 5,288 

Dominion Textile Limited 3,016 

Domohue Norwick Incorporated 73,706 

Domtar Packaging Company 21,158 

Donn Canada Limited/Limitee 1,604 

D'Orlan Jewellers Limited 1,677 

Dorr Oliver Canada Limited 1,588 

Dow Chem Can Incorporated 34,168 

Dresser Atlas Incorporated 19,925 

Dresser Canada Limited 5,027 

Dresser Canada Magcobor Group 5,387 

Dresser Industries 1,841 

DRG Packaging Limited 1,797 

Drummond Equipment Incorporated 2,094 

Du Pont Canada Incorporated 9,935 

Ducros Meilleur Roy 1,201 

Duha Printers (Western) Limited 2,761 

Dunbar Manufacturing Incorporated 16,160 

Duraco Products Incorporated 15,323 

Dyna Well Test Limited 2,542 

Dynapro Systems Incorporated 2,168 



Dynatec Mining Limited 2,553 

Dywidag Fab Con Products Limited 6,552 

EJ Maxwell 1,223 

Earth Systems Limited 1,016 

Eastern Precision 3,660 

Eaton Yale Limited 3,224 

Ebco Industries Limited 14,659 

EC and M Electric Limited 52,302 

Echo Bay Mines Limited 31,188 

Eclairage Tanguay Incorporated 60,861 

ECOS Environment Solutions 6,128 

Edgewind Sales and Manufacturing Limited 2,535 

Edmonton Sun, The 3,046 

Edward High Vacuum (Canada) 3,238 

EEV Canada Limited 1,111 

Effanel Music 2,812 

Egan Visual Incorporated 39,692 

Ehrlich Harvesting 3,884 

Ekco Canada Limited 40,575 

Elan Tool and Die Limited 3,021 

Elastometal Limited 4,165 

Eldon Industries of Canada 27,480 

Electrical Terminal Corporation 19,21 1 

Electro Rent (Canada) Limited 128,138 

Electrolab Limited 7,544 

Electronics Corporation of America 2,286 

Elgin Petroleum Limited 10,854 

Elias Brothers Restaurant 1,565 

Elicon Industrial Controls 1,469 

Elliot Industrial Equipment 2,786 

Elmwood Golf and Country Club 3,839 

Elscint Canada Limited 1 1,655 

EMC Corporation 2,523 

Emerson Electric Canada Limited 1,805 

Emhart Canada Limited Mallory Components Divi- 
sion 1,924 

Ener Rig Supply Limited 22,638 

Ener — Tech Industries (Edmonton) Limited 2,891 

Energesis Control Systems 4,280 

Engelhard Industry Canada Limited 10,164 

Enterprises Beckwith — Bemis Incorporated 2,925 

Entreprise Blouin 4,925 

Envirocon Limited 1,468 

Environment Unlimited 5,967 

Equipment Domar Incorporated 7,361 

Equisonics 1,699 

Equity Silver Mines 4,576 

Ernest Angley Evangelistic Crusade Incorporated 35,772 

Erwin Industries Canada Limited 1,455 

Esco Limited 4,535 

EscoTool 3,980 

Eskafot Canada Limited 1,242 

Esko Industry 1,763 

Essex Golf and Country Club 5,829 

Esso Chemical 17,990 

Esso Resources Canada Limited 6,591,889 

Estee Lauder Cosmetics Limited 10,413 

Ethyl Canada Incorporated 6,064 

Ethyl Imco Incorporated 81,667 

Etna Color Laboratory 2,209 

Euclid Canada 18,095 

Euroclean Canada Incorporated 20,006 

Evergreen TV Products Incorporated 34,374 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13-9 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Exco Engineering Division 3,260 

Execaire Aviation Limitee 26,288 

Executone Limited 1,570 

Exel Elevators Limited 1,276 

Explotech Engineering 1,121 

Expo Vision Incorporated 1,633 

Export Tool and Welding Company 4,493 

Express Plastic Containers Limited 1,030 

F and H Plastics Limited 2,471 

F Jos Lamb Company Limited 94,906 

Fabric Car Association 1,145 

Fag Bearings 2,685 

Falco Stainless Steel 4,157 

Farinon Electric Canada 20,761 

Farris, William 7,092 

Fathom Atlantic Limited 1,700 

Fedco Audio Labs Limited 14,183 

Federal Pioneer Limited 6,522 

Ferguson Supply Limited 4,576 

Ferro Technique 7,887 

Feuillerat Donald Rodney 16,438 

Fiat Products Limited 5,300 

Fiba — Canning Incorporated 23,684 

Fiberglass Canada Limited Incorporated 84,003 

Ficomat International Incorporated 3,987 

Findley Advance Design Industries Limited 9,344 

Firestone Canada 3,516 

Firing Industries Limited 13,527 

Fisher Controls Company of Canada 33,340 

Fisher Scientific 3,098 

Fishery Products Limited 1,658 

Fitch Research Corporation 19,082 

Fleck Manufacturing 6,637 

Fleet Industries A Division of Ronyx Corporation 

Limited 3,583 

Fluor Canada Limited 5,678 

Follow That Bird Product Incorporated 20,966 

Fonderie Magotteaux Canada 2,320 

Ford Electronics Manufacturing Corporation 26,852 

Ford Motor Company of Canada Limited 350,102 

Formanite Canada Limited 2,475 

Foseco Canada Limited 3,828 

Foster Advertising Company 1,522 

Foster Wheeler Limited 10,141 

Fournier Incorporated Jean 3,534 

Foxboro Canada Incorporated 3,201 

Franklin Manufacturing Company (Canada) Limited.. 6,500 

Fraser Incorporated 1 1,594 

Freedland Industries Limited 1 1,904 

Fries Entertainment Incorporated 8,714 

Fruehauf Canada Incorporated 1,590 

Fuller Brush Company 24,128 

Funk, Allen 15,909 

GA Computers 7,008 

GB Converters Limited 1,648 

GEC Diesels Incorporated 6,383 

GLC Canada 1,932 

GN Johnston 3,986 

GR Financial Incorporated 9,1 16 

GTE Sylvania Canada Limited 1,312 

GTE Unistrut Limited 15,091 

GW Electric 1,121 

Gainers Incorporated 2,716 



Galvanic Analytical Systems 1,057 

Galvin, Joe 4,483 

Gapcan Welding Construction Limited 7,157 

Gardner, Denver 31,345 

Garrett Manufacturing Limited 13,315 

Gates Canada Incorporated 19,994 

Gatti Productions Incorporated 1,796 

GEAC Canada Limited 4,464 

Geddes Contracting 22,588 

Gelfand, Richard 3,542 

General Aluminum Forgings Incorporated 103,765 

General Electric Medical 13,998 

General Foods Incorporated 2,205 

General Instrument of Canada Limited 16,047 

General Motors 284,757 

General Printing 2,810 

General Refactories Company of Canada Limited 4,495 

General Signal of Canada Limited 2,507 

General Sound Division of Famous Players Limited .... 1,103 

General Tire Canada Limited 1,539 

Genrad Limited 98,954 

Genstar 524,793 

Genstar Rental Electronics Incorporated 176,497 

Gentian Electronics Limited 2,054 

Geophysical Services Incorporated 5,297 

Gerber Camsco Incorjjorated 3,224 

Gerber Scientific 8,300 

Gestion Paul de Villers 2,155 

Gibson Electric of Canada Limited 2,374 

Giga — Tron Associates Limited 7,515 

Gillette Canada 14,582 

Gladwin Machinery of Canada Limited 1,981 

GLE Incorporated 1,466 

Glencoe Tubular Limited 1,038 

Global Heat International 1,093 

Globe and Mail, The 1,994 

Gold Metal Equipment Alberta Limited 1,966 

Goodall Rubber Company 1,194 

Goodbrand Construction Limited 28,094 

Goodyear Canada 1,920 

Gordon Ray Equipment 34,651 

Gorman Rupp of Canada Limited 1,388 

Gorrie Advertising Management Limited 45,176 

Gourock Industries Incorporated 17,554 

Graco Children's Products Canada Limited 6,289 

Grand Prix du Canada 7,075 

Grant Waferboard 1,014 

Graphico Precision Limited 2,618 

Great Lakes Carbon Canada Corporation 3,506 

Great Lakes Forest Products 2,760 

Greater Niagara Association of the Mentally Retard- 
ed 1,888 

Greenridge Sciences Incorporated 8,509 

Greif Containers Incorporated 13,063 

Grid Systems Canada Incorporated 1,229 

Griffith Laboratories Limited 2,635 

Griffith, Robert 3,243 

Groves SJ 15,702 

Grunko Films 5,987 

Gtech Computer 10,085 

Guelph Tool 1,079 

Gulf Canada Limited 1,674,500 

Gulf Canada Resources Incorporated 169,813 



13' 10 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Guthrie Engineering 1,051 

Guy Pare et Associes Incorporee 1,471 

HD Hudson 3,431 

HDC Industries Limited 27,860 

Haliburton and White Limited 2,428 

Haljon Controls Incorporated 1,763 

Halton, Regional Municipality of 4,710 

Hamelin Enterprises 1,413 

Harris Systems Limited 1,292 

Harvey Engineering and Manufacturing Corporation .. 1,062 

Hasbro Industries 21,965 

Hawker Siddeley Diesels and Electrics Limited 4,482 

Hayes Dana Incorporated 1,721 

Head Office Productions 25,693 

Heinl Electronics Incorporated 1,129 

Helicopter Welders of Canada 2,926 

Henderson, Kendal 8,157 

Herabert Dube Company Limited 10,167 

Hercules Canada 2,837 

Hersbey Canada 1,694 

Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Limited 726,668 

Highway Stamping (Windsor) Limited 10,823 

Hillerickand Bradsby of Canada 9,431 

Himont Canada 177,105 

Hitachi Denshi Limited 7,222 

Hitachi HSC Canada Incorporated 1,306 

HMC Computer Corporation 3,058 

Hobart Brothers of Canada 2,634 

Hoechst Canada 1,222 

Holiday Juice Limited 1,955 

Holland Company Incorporated 3,502 

Holman Production Services Limited 27,198 

Honda Canada Incorporated 2,722 

Honeywell Limited 26,125 

Hoover Universal 1,974 

HortonCBI Limited 26,100 

Hoskin Scientific Limited 4,337 

Humboldt, Wedag 5,057 

Humphrey Cosburn Company 4,732 

Hunter Environmental 16,041 

Huron Steel Products (Windsor) Limited 2,374 

Huyck Canada Limited 8,766 

Hy — Grade Precast Concrete 4,209 

Hydro Quebec 59,751 

Hyster Canada Limited 4,408 

IBM Canada Limited 21,121 

Ideal Metal Stamping 1,191 

Ideal Security 12,699 

Ideal Toy Company Limited 3,278 

lEC Beak Consultants Limited 1,892 

Image Technologies Incorporated 8,272 

Imapio Incorporated 1,034 

Imperial Clevite Canada Incorporated 9,466 

Imperial Oil Limited 79,1 15 

Imperial Rubber Company Limited 3,743 

Importations Aldiec 1,615 

In Motion 10,684 

Inco Limited 23,964 

Industrial Grain Products 3,046 

Industrial Welding Incorporated 1,771 

Information Systems and Services 1,205 

Infotron Canada 7,778 

Ingersoll-Rand Canada Incorporated 124,236 

Inmont Canada 1 1,075 



Innotech Aviation Limited 307,970 

Innovation International 1,582 

Inspectronic Limitee 3,512 

Institut de Bio Endocrinologie 1,329 

Instrument Services Laboratories 3,819 

Instrumental Rentals Canada Division 89,180 

Integrated Plastics Limited 2,203 

Intel Semiconductor of Canada Limited 113,188 

Inter City Gas 3,957 

Inter Video Big Shot 5,897 

Interbake Foods 6,793 

Intercontinental Production Services 5,289 

Interface Floors Systems (Canada) Incorporated 1,827 

Interfax Systems Incorporated 43,869 

Interforest Limited 1,010 

International Games of Canada 2,074 

International Harvester Company Canada Limited 3,045 

International Imaging Systems 1,474 

International Minerals and Chemicals Limited 13,810 

International Productions 1,894 

International Submarine 3,784 

International Tools (1973) Limited 3,178 

Internote Canada Limitee 1,292 

Interprovincial Pipeline 34,781 

Inventronics Limited 3,499 

Ipec Incorporated 4,281 

IRM Canada Limited 1,336 

Iron Ore 9,1 17 

Irving Oil Transport 78,884 

Irwin Toy Limited 221,040 

ITC Productions 16,615 

Itron Incorporated 4,825 

ITT Blackburn Company 2,103 

ITT Industries of Canada Communication 48,585 

ITT Industries of Canada Limited 4,889 

.JFJ Mold Processors Limited 4,097 

JI Case Canada A Division of Tenneco Canada 14,137 

JI Case Canada Limited 31,194 

JM Asbestos 1,812 

JR Products 27,915 

Jack Lieb Productions Incorporated 3,591 

Jacuzzi Canada Limited 5,1 19 

Jaeger Machine Company of Canada 1,176 

Jaguar Canada Incorporated 2,877 

James River Marathon Limited 3,025 

Jamesbury Canada Limited 3,062 

Jan — Ber and Associates Limited 5,876 

Jansa, Steve 16,783 

Jay Plastics Company 43,787 

JCB Excavators Limited 1,925 

JEM Productions 14,756 

Jena Instruments 1,322 

Jerome and Fran9ais Company 4,545 

John Deere Limited 33,326 

John — Harding Editing Limited 2,533 

John Meunier 2,628 

John T Batts Enterprise Canada Limited 6,575 

Johnson and Johnson 6,380 

Joseph Mark Photography 1,447 

Jouets Ritvik Incorporated 202,794 

Journal de Montreal 1,813 

Joy Manufacturing Company Canada Limited 9,544 

Jutra Die Casting 1,321 

K — Tel International Limited 2,329 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13' 11 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

S 

KF Perkins Enterprises 10,224 

Kadon Electro Mechanical Service 1,139 

Kamyo Canada Limited 5,573 

Kamyr, Valve 1,731 

Kaptest Engineering Limited 2,020 

Kasle Steel of Canada Limited 7,785 

Kawneer Company Canada Limited 3,131 

KCTS— 9 Television 9,690 

Kehler Computer Services 1,048 

Kellogg Salada Canada 9,429 

Kelsey — Hayes Canada Limited 38,284 

Kelt Marine Incorporated 3,798 

Kendal Canada Division of CKR Incorporated 3,039 

Kenner Products (Canada) Limited 74,145 

Kerton Industrial Contractor 52,216 

Keuffel and Esser of Canada Limited 5,385 

Key Lake Mining Corporation 5,586 

KHD Canada Incorporated 1,270 

Kimberly Clark Canada 122,597 

Kimbley, George 2,870 

Kimline Sanderson Limited 21,706 

King Truck Engineering Liriiited 14,047 

Kirby International Limited 2,190 

Kirk Equipment Limited 1,603 

Kleen Stik Fasson Incorporated 5,191 

Kinetic Dispersion 8,895 

Kodak Canada Limited 25,193 

Kombine and Sanderson Limited 45,91 1 

Kord Products Limited 101,844 

Korite Minerals Limited 6,441 

Kraft Limited 13,466 

Kruger Incorporated 3,107 

KSH Canada Incorporated 1,988 

KSH Canada Limitee 16,259 

Kurzwell Music 2,496 

KVOS— TV BC 2,183 

LG Balfour 1,081 

LGL Limited 1,245 

LN Enterprises 2,691 

LS Starrett Company of Canada Limited 1,100 

La Cie Commonwealth 1,288 

La Cie Manufacturiere 2,750 

La Corporation Icanda 15,129 

La Societe d'Exploitation 3,803 

Lab Volt Quebec Limitee 7,525 

Lafferty Hardwood and Part 1 ,343 

Lambton Pipe and Supply Limited 14,834 

Lamco Die Cast 4,021 

Lampson Corporation 1,786 

Laniel Canada 25,970 

Lansing Bagnail 5,295 

Last Day Ministries 26,298 

Lauzier and Little 6,319 

Lawton Die Cast Company 5,664 

Le Blanc and Royale Communications Tower Limited 1,851 

Lear Siegler Industry 7,388 

Leasemetrics Canada Incorporated 134,415 

Leco Instruments Limited 55,852 

Lee Aluminum Sales Limited 1,468 

Leigh Metal Products Limited 10,761 

Lenox Machine Company 1,930 

Les Boureilles Browns 4,080 

Les Controls RTL Incorporated 1,188 

Les Equipements de Bureau 2,837 



Les Helicopteres Trans-Quebec 2,013 

Les Industries de Fibre 1,667 

Les Industries Sanyo 2,371 

Les Industries Wedco Limitee 1,155 

Les Papiers Perkins 22,142 

Les Tapis Peerless 1,018 

Lever Brothers Limited 3,260 

Libby McNeil and Libby of Canada 1,922 

Life Action Miniatures 6,731 

Lily Cups Incorporated 1,755 

Limelight Incorporated 6,383 

Liquid Carbonic Incorporated 1,712 

Litho Prestige 1,046 

Little Boraland Limited 1,367 

Litton Systems Canada Limited 24,290 

Lombard Company 9,369 

Long Manufacturing Division Borg — Warner 

(Canada) Limited 3,586 

Loral Terracom 2,882 

Lovell, Allan 2,958 

Lower Churchill Falls Development Corporation 10,535 

Lubrizal of Canada Limited 32,615 

Lundy Electronics 1,1 17 

Luscar Stereo (1977) Limited 3,590 

Lytle Specialities Limited 4,682 

M and K Plastics Production 41,576 

MEC Company 1,623 

MSC Electronics Limited 8,844 

MSE Engineering Limited 54,806 

MT Chemicals 1,468 

MTS Systems Corporation 5,855 

MA Electronics Canada Limited 7,732 

Mac Millan Bloedel Limited 4,156 

Macbeth Division of KoUmargen 7,548 

MacCaferri Steel Wire Products Limited 1,21 1 

Macdonald, Dettweiler 8,383 

Mack Canada 2,703 

MacLean — Hunter Publication Limited 1,017 

MacMillan Bathurst Incorporated 1,364 

Madowcon Technology Limited 1,570 

Magnetic Metals Limited 3,322 

Mailing Innovations Limited 13,709 

Mainland, Elworthy 2,247 

Man Middlesx NJ 1,338 

Manford Limited Pulp and Paper 5,615 

Manitoba Hydro 7,082 

Manitoba Opera Association Incorporated 12,453 

Manitoba Telephone System 38,474 

Mannesmann Demag Limited 26,538 

Manville Canada Limited 36,312 

Marican Offshore Drilling Services 4,488 

Marion Power Shovel 61,024 

Maritime Builders 1,973 

Mark Bobsky 8,080 

Marr's Leisure Products (1977) Incorporated 1,073 

Marsh and McLennan Limited 1,518 

Martin Decker Division of Cooper Petroleum 1 0,0 1 7 

Martin Traction Canada Incorporated 7,212 

Mascia, Emilo 3,387 

Master Chemical Corporation 4,1 19 

Mastic Incorporated L021 

Matheson Gas Products Canada Incorporated 8,418 

Mattel Canada Limited 255,024 

Maynard I and B Scientific Division 5,41 1 



13M2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

McCain Foods Limited 3,718 

McCutcheon Graghies 2,651 

McDonalds Restaurant 120,854 

McDonnell Douglas Canada 13,635 

McElhanny Surveying 1,814 

McGraw Edison Limited 4,098 

McGregor Paving Limited 47,713 

McKim Advertising Company 1,608 

McLaren Advertising 1,249 

McLeod Stedman Incorporated 2,871 

McMurray Huges Division of Huges Tool 6,891 

Measurex Canada 1,558 

Media Com Incorporated 13,632 

Media Videotex 2,468 

Medigas Pacific Limited 4,439 

Meester Mike's Incorporated 9,982 

Megatel Systems 1,184 

Megatronix Incorporated 1 1,396 

Meidinger K 18,139 

Melnoc Manufacturing 1,023 

Mennen Canada Incorporated 3,608 

Merit Manufacturing Limited 12,980 

Merrill Lynch Royal Securities 2,441 

Metalworks Recording Studios 349,151 

Methodswork Incorporated 7,1 16 

Metro Canada Limited 1,007 

Metro Goldwin Meyer Productions Limited 26,905 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 2,677 

Metropolitan Toronto Police 45,478 

Meyer Products Incorporated 1,107 

Meyer Service and Supply Limited 1,712 

MGM/UA Entertainment 3,470 

MGW Controls 1,623 

Michael Fields 1,178 

Micro Publishing Services 2,857 

Mikes Custom Harvesting 5,041 

Miles Laboratories Limited 4,291 

Millar Lister Sales 1,697 

Millar Western Industries Limited 1,093 

Miller Contracting Limited 6,741 

Miller, Herman 4,532 

Millmano Communications 6,772 

Milton Bradley Canada Incorporated 161,075 

Mineral Research and Development 3,178 

Minolta 1,070 

Mitec Electronics 5,503 

Mitel Semiconductors 1,594 

Mitsubishi Canada Limited 1,194,908 

Mobil Oil Canada Limited 9,823 

Modasco Canada Incorporated 1,922 

Modcamp Canada Limited 1,181 

Modular Mining System 1,009 

Mohawk Data Science Canada Limited 3,741 

Monarch Marking Systems c/o Simpson Stores 2,912 

Mono Research Laboratory 2,005 

Monsanto Canada Limited 12,491 

Montreal Convention Center 7,257 

Montreal General Hospital 13,599 

Moog Canada 9,384 

Moore Business Forms Division of Moore Corporation 

Limited 7,961 

Moore Industries Division 1,255 

Morgan Precision Tools Limited 1,717 

Morval Canada Limited 23,916 



S 

Mosler Canada 1,704 

Motion Control Systems Incorporated 1,776 

Motion Shows 38,284 

Motor Wheel Corporation of Canada Limited 63,982 

Motorola Canada Incorporated 15,354 

Moulage Sous Pression 7,310 

Movie Corporation 5,995 

MSC Electronics Limited 1 1,942 

MTD Products Limited 167,519 

MTV Networks Incorporated 7,483 

Mueller Limited 6,071 

Muirhead Systems Limited 1,379 

Multi Fittings 1,501 

Multilingual TV 2,766 

Muro — Watt Control Devices Limited 1,751 

Mutual Life of Canada 19,121 

Mylec Canada Limited 186,070 

Myles Canada Limited 15,243 

NB Electric Power 7,863 

NB Telephone Company Limited 1,016 

NCR Canada Limited 37,768 

NDT Technologies 2,014 

NEI Canada Limited 5,038 

NS Power Corporation 9,015 

Nabisco Foods Limited, Division of Christie Brown 

and Company Limited 3,270 

Nadrofsky Corporation 31,399 

Nalley's Canada 1,169 

National Auto Radiator Company Limited 1,671 

National Electronic Agencies 1,259 

National Liquid Blasting Corporation 43,1 19 

National Research Council 2,656 

National Rubber 242,179 

National Sea Products 2,842 

Nationwide Electronics 1,932 

Natty Gann 29,678 

Navair Limited 1,680 

Nei Clarke 1,129 

NEI Parson Canada 6,196 

Neo Industries Limited 1,569 

Neptune Meters Limited 4,343 

Nerada, Larry 6,592 

Network Systems Corporation 6,319 

Neutron Products 4,867 

New Brunswick Power 2,513 

New Media Graphics 1,882 

New York Air Brake Company 9,345 

Neway Can Lear Siegler Incorporated 2,401 

Newfoundland Labrador Hydro 48,134 

Newfoundland Light and Power Company Limited 5,796 

Newfoundland Telephone Company 67,166 

Newmont Exploration 3,681 

Neyrfor Turbo Drilling 16,500 

Nicholson, Kelly 10,394 

Nicolet Canada Limited 3,498 

Nicolet Instrument Canada 16,739 

NilexGeotech 1,105 

Nillson Tool Company Limited 3,599 

Noranda Mines Limited 3,235 

Noranda Research 2,193 

Norca Industries 1,315 

Norpac Controls Limited 30,628 

Norpak Corporation 9,840 

Norseman Plastics Limited 17,263 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 



13*13 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Nortec SGS Incorporated 4,094 

Nortec West Limited 2,229 

North American Controls 1 1,371 

North American Specialty Pipe Limited 1,1 10 

North Wind Power Company Incorporated 2,062 

Northern Alberta Dairy Pool 2,354 

Northern Canada Power Commission 1,219 

Northern Strands (1976) Limited 15,120 

Northern Telecom Canada Limited 60,581 

Northside Steel Fabricators 1,261 

Northwood Mills Limited 1,209 

Norton Company of Canada Limited 3,931 

Nova An Alberta Corporation 387,123 

Nova CD Limited 1,408 

Novatel Communications Limited 1,525 

Nowsco Well Service Limited 6,352 

Nu-Dell Plastics Limited 6,537 

Nucleus Tool and Die Limited 2,424 

Nuodex Canada Limited 2,021 

OH Material Company 3,952 

Oakville Stamping and Bending Limited 6,167 

Obed Marsh Dome 17,017 

Ogilvie Flour Mills 1,921 

Okanagan Helicopters 1,867 

Oliver Agricultural 10,055 

Olsonite Products Limited 12,843 

Omark Canada 22,435 

Oneida Canada Limited 4,419 

Ontario Hydro Limited 73,509 

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources 2,944 

Ontario Robotico Limited 25,145 

Opera Hamilton 14,910 

Optical Art Camera Corporation 1,061 

Optikon Corporation Limited 1,435 

Ordigraphe 1.336 

Oregon Technical Products 1,047 

Ortho Instrument Westwood 1,374 

Otis Elevator Company Limited 8,085 

Outboard Marine Corporation of Canada Limited 2,176 

PPG Industries Canada Limited 1,981 

Paccar International 4,1 12 

Pacific Coast Cleaners Limited 1,348 

Pacific Western Airlines 13,923 

Page — Wilson Company 4,600 

Panavision Canada 34,515 

Pandrol Canada Limited 1,106 

Pannell Kerr Forster 1,715 

Paper Mate Canada 5,078 

Papier St-Raymond Limitee 4,213 

Paradyne Canada Limited 29,504 

Pare Neuvilie 1 1,682 

Parker Brothers Games Limited 88,216 

Parker Brothers Limited Division of General Mills 

Canada 13,024 

Parker Hanifan (Canada) Limited 1,806 

Paul Wurth Limited 7,282 

Paxton, Doug 8,593 

Paysier Journal Domtar Limitee 1,637 

Peacock Brothers Limited 1,560 

Peel Memorial Hospital 1,142 

Pegasus Division of Koehring 1,910 

Pelsue Incorporated 4,154 

Pemberton CA Company Limited 4,096 



S 

Pembina Pipeline Limited 9,266 

Pensinsula Fittings Limited 10,848 

Pennwalt Incorporated 23,262 

Perceptron Incorporated 1,205 

Perkin-Elmer (Canada) Limited 6.918 

Permasteel Construction 1,318 

Permasteel Corporation Limited 1,050 

Peter Austin Manufacturing Company 5,092 

Petrefond Fondation 1,410 

Petro Canada Exploration Incorporated 7,046 

Petrolite Corporation of Canada 1,002 

Petromont Incorporated 13,349 

Petrosar Limited 5,690 

Petty Ray Physical Operations 6,238 

PH Molds Limited 1,139 

Philips Cable Limited 2,651 

Phillips Electronics Limited 19,683 

Phillips Extruded Products Limited 34,847 

Photo Kina 1.250 

Photo Station Incorporated 1,234 

Photographic Analysis Limited 2,150 

Picker International Canada Incorporated 42,224 

Pilot Plant Corporation 6,487 

Pineway Electronics Limited 1,608 

Pirelli Cables 1.404 

Pirelli — Jerome Incorporated 1 1,467 

PK Sports Products 1,894 

Plandata Electronics 12,131 

Plastibeton Incorporated 7,293 

Plasticap Limited 6,558 

Plastics CMP Limited 8,347 

Plastics Corporation Limited 2,159 

Plastique DCN Incorporated 3,789 

Plastiques Modernes Limitee 32,51 1 

Plastiques Richmond 2,798 

Plastiques Vital Incorporated 2,809 

Plastomer Incorporated 4,280 

Plax Division of Bradley — Fenn Enterprises Incorpo- 
rated 74,952 

Plibrico Canada Limited 1,310 

Plus Method Corporation 1,686 

Polaroid Corporation of Canada 14,415 

Polysar Limited 2,707 

Ponts Cartier and Champlain 5,21 1 

Port of Saint John, NB 8,888 

Port Weller Dry Docks Limited 1,040 

Portion Packaging Incorporated 3,708 

Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Mining Limited.. 2,424 

Potter Electric Signal and Manufacturing Limited 1,237 

Poyton and Vector Corporation 4,736 

Pratt and Whitney Aircraft of Canada Limited 142,453 

Precious Plate Limited 2,826 

Precision Valve Canada Limited 16,183 

Predictive Maintenance 3,127 

Pretech Incorporated 9,028 

Price, Wilson 1.840 

Prime Computer of Canada 8,592 

Princess Cruises 10,284 

Prize Films Incorporated 15,774 

Process Analytics A Division of Combustion Engineer- 
ing 3,455 

Proctor and Gamble Incorporated 45,279 

Productions Marc Durand Incorporated 63,238 



13-14 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Produits Caillette 

ProduitsCLB 

Protection CFH 

Protective Plastics 

Proturn Incorporated 

Pumps and Power Limited 

Purves Ritchie Division of Rivtow 

QTT Fer et Titane Incorporee 

Quaker Oats Company Canada Limited 

Quality NDE 

Quality Plastics Limited 

Quantum Technologies 

Quebec Air Limited 

Quenord Incorporated 

Quintette Coal Limited 

Quintina Products 

Quinton Instrument Company 

Quision, Jules 

RBW Graphics Limited 

RBW Incorporated c/o Danfoss Canada Limited . 

RDC Electronics Limited 

RJ Stamping 

ROR Associates 

RV Compagnie 

RVR McDonald 

Racal 

Racal Survey (Canada) Limited 

Radionics Scientific Incorporated 

Rainbow Wars 

Rama Housewares 

Ramble Film Productions Limited 

Ramie Corporation 

Rank Peripheral Gtech 

Rapistan Division of Lear Siegler Incorporated ... 

Rattei, Tony 

Ray Plastics Limited 

Raytheon Canada Limited 

RCA Records 

RCR International 

Rector Gray Limited 

Red Top Equipment Company Limited 

Redirack Industries Limited 

Reeves Brothers Canada Limited 

Regatta Productions 

Regional Die Casting Limited 

Reliance Electric 

Reliance Telecommunications 

Relmech Manufacturing Limited 

Rema Electronic Limited 

Rene Fibres de Verre 

Renmark Electronics Limited 

Resdon Cosmetic Containers Incorporated 

Reuters Stokes Canada Limited 

Rexnord Canada Limited 

Reynolds and Reynolds 

Rice Engineering and Operating Limited 

Richard Haensch 

Richards — Wilcox of Canada 

Richardson — Vicks Limited 

Rivtow Straits Limited 

RMS Industrial Controls 

Robert Bosch Canada Limited 

Robert Hunt Corporation 

Robertshaw Controls Canada Incorporated 



$ $ 

1,805 Robertson White Engineering Limited 1,539 

5,507 Rocca Construction Limited 21,443 

3,151 Rockford Auto 9,001 

3,335 Rockwell International of Canada Limited 23,513 

6,361 Rogers Cable TV 1,605 

1,339 Rollins Machinery Limited 17,316 

1,703 Romatec RML 2,922 

6,230 Romor Equipment Limited 1,170 

4,881 Ron Carriere and Associates 30,258 

2,456 Ror Associates Limited 3,063 

6,230 Ross Roy of Canada 10,071 

1,153 Ross Whitehead 1,193 

2,443 Rothmans of Pallmall Canada Limited 5,876 

7,499 Roto Precision Incorporated 1,180 

2,631 Royal Canadian Mint 3,546 

5,036 Royal Canadian Mounted Police 31,503 

2,998 Rubbermaid Canada Incorporated 1,030,976 

4,891 Rush Electronics Industries 412,160 

2,305 Rush Productions 865,869 

3,003 Russell Ultra Sound 1,146 

2,416 Rustshield Plating Limited 5,325 

38,376 SA Systemes 1,847 

5,415 SAI Productions 7,692 

18,166 SC Johnson and Son Limited 2,505 

23,747 SDRC Incorporated 1,761 

1,134 SI Handling Systems Limited 1,662 

2,253 SMC Group 7,282 

14,867 SRP Control Systems Limited 6,926 

3,325 STC Canada Limited 6,303 

4,439 Safety Supply Company Canada 2,843 

17,041 Sahuaro Petroleum and Asphalt Company 13,796 

2,436 Salaison Olympia Limitee 20,882 

1,680 Salton Fabrication Limited 2,197 

15,891 Samuel Son and Company Limited 2,860 

10,107 Sanair 29,799 

6, 1 5 3 Sandvik Process Systems Canada Limited 1 7,240 

52,405 Sangamo Canada (Division of Schlumberger Canada 

27,062 Limited) 3,242 

4,094 Sanivan Incorporated 24,784 

14,949 Sanivan Ontario Incorporated 6,700 

25,852 Sanyo Industries Canada Incorporated 5,624 

8,846 Saskatchewan Telephone 2,666 

1,247 Saskatoon Power Corporation 43,651 

55,629 Sayler Chester 8,259 

13,973 Scandia Shipping 2,309 

22,829 Sceptee Riedel Dawson 43,479 

1,044 Scepter Manufacturing Company Limited 2,448 

4,090 Schenck Farms and Greenhouses Company Limited .... 3,071 

1,358 Schlegel Lining Technology Incorporated 66,937 

12,166 Schneider JM Incorporated 5,119 

1,487 Schwing America 15,223 

7,351 Sciences Judiciaires 1,453 

6,502 Scientific Atlanta Canada 17,016 

11,490 Scientific Atlantic 1,117 

3,494 Scientific Calculations 5,310 

5,952 Scope Films 2,105 

2,077 Scott Maritimes Limited 32,740 

1,484 Scott Paper Limited 10,952 

5,730 SCP Sciences 3,496 

4,376 SCR Investments Incorporated 9,187 

2,409 Sea Foxes Production 1,692 

1,187 Sea Plantations Incorporated 1,833 

1,025 Seaboard Digital Systems Incorporated 1,211 

4,179 Seametric Incorporated 174,821 



SVPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 



13«15 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

S 

Seer Canada Limited 8,402 

Seignory Chemico 2,156 

Selcan Limited 12,318 

Semi — Tech Micro Electronics 1,955 

Sentrol Systems Limited 6,838 

Sentry Accounting Marketing 1,764 

Separator Engineering 5,896 

Servo Robot 15,908 

Shambroom Paul Photography 4,777 

Shell Canada Limited 93,096 

Sheller Globe of Canada Limited 76,344 

Shelley RG Limited 5,909 

Shepherd Manufacturing Company Limited 3,352 

Sherritt Gordon Mines Limited 42,226 

Shop Vac of Canada Limited 49,131 

Shuriken Distributors Incorporated 1,242 

Sia Company 8,638 

Sico Incorporated 1,644 

Sidbec Dosco 5,746 

Siemens Electric Limited 27,199 

Sigmacom Systems Incorporated 4,435 

Signatel Limited 1,517 

Silicart Circuits 3,695 

Silver Grizzly Timber 2,074 

Simco Ramie Corporation 5,053 

Simon Day Limited 8,549 

Simplex International Time Equipment Company 

Limited 9,350 

Simplified Operating Systems Incorporated 3,623 

Sinclair Radio Laboratories Incorporated 1,219 

Singer Company of Canada Limited 2,509 

Sino Incorporated 1,318 

Sipma, Hans 1,567 

Sirdofsky Arthur Photography 2,514 

Sky Switch Satellite 2,097 

Skyword Productions Limited 88,500 

Smidth FL Company of Canada 6,007 

Smith Press Automation 2,499 

Smithers — Oasis Canada Limited 1,584 

Soceta Cavi Pirelli 13,634 

Societe Radio-Canada 109,953 

Sola Canada 3,707 

Solaray Division of Sunbeam Corporation (Canada) 

Limited 60,318 

Solartron Instruments 4,651 

Solotech Incorporated 4,686 

Soloy Conversions 5.418 

Solus Manufacturing 1,008 

Somerville Belkin Industries Limited 19,650 

Sonat Offshore Canada Limited 5,378 

Sonics Exploration Limited 15,886 

Sono Technique 19,030 

Sono Technique PJL Incorporee 1,767 

Soundair Limited 15,480 

Southwest Research Institute 16,837 

Spar Aerospace Products Limited 12,283 

Sparton Tool and Mould Limited 1,785 

Specialty Cast Metals Limited 1,307 

Speed Sport 33,832 

Speed Sports Promotion 149,829 

Spenc Rail Services Company 2,202 

Sperry Corporation 16,154 

Sperry Incorporated 15,622 

Spike, Jensen 15,364 



S 

Spun Steel Limited 9,749 

St-Lawrence Metal Industry Canada 1,850 

St Marys Cement Company 2,955 

Standard Paper Box ( 1 979) Incorporated 1 ,049 

Standard Products Limited 5,194 

Standard Telefon Kabel Fabrik 14,998 

Stanley Door Systems Limited 2,705 

Star Expansion Industry Limited 1,914 

Star Headlight and Lantern Company of Canada 

Limited 3,308 

Starcraft Recreational Products Limited 9,147 

Starger Company, The 4,659 

Starks, Dale 12,472 

Starrlett LS Company of Canada Limited 2,197 

State Farm Insurance 2,080 

Stearns Catalytic Limited Air Products Division 1,867 

Steel Brothers Canada Limited 6,977 

Steel Case Canada Limited 4,816 

Steffen Robertson and Kirsten 1,010 

Stelco Incorporated 19,822 

Steri Systems Limited 7,690 

Sterile Pharmaceuticals Limited 4,686 

Sterling Advisory Service 2,548 

Stevens Hepner Company Limited 34,824 

Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation 6,1 12 

Stone — Safety Canada Limited 3,165 

Storey Gilbert C Limited 1,073 

Strathroy Foods Division Ontario Limited 1,777 

Streamline Copper Brass Limited 3,837 

Streit Harvesting 49,226 

Structural Dynamics Research Corporation 38,348 

Strudex Fibres Limited 2,678 

Studer Revox Limited 1,942 

Sullivan Strong Scott Limited 1,332 

Sumitomo Canada Limited 40,677 

Sun Pac Foods Limited 5,280 

Suncor Incorporated 1,037 

Sunds Defibrator Limited 1,877 

Sunoco Incorporated 6,424 

Sunohio 37,350 

Superior Performance (Canada) Limited 1,275 

Superior Performances 6,281 

Surga Limited 152,902 

Surveyer Nenniger and Chenevert 24,891 

Sweaney, Dale 4,665 

Sweaney, Tom 6,200 

Sweda International Limited 6,570 

Swiss Instruments Limited 5,320 

Sybron/Analytical Products Division 2,067 

Symak Sales Company 2,215 

Symposium International Transport 1,374 

Syncrude Canada Limited 22,192 

Synochrotel Communications Limited 4,460 

Syntex Incorporated 2,653 

Systemes de Support 2,748 

Systemes Hydrauliques Scan — Am Incorporee 3,575 

Systemhouse Limited 1,398 

Systron Proquip 1,613 

T Thompson Limited 13,293 

TDW Sales 68,659 

TE Systems Laboratories 1,918 

TV Marocaine 12,686 

Tahsis Company Limited 6,341 

Taillefer Division Imasco Limitee 3,940 



13-16 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Tartien Ajax 3,684 

TAS — Page Communications 1,346 

Tasman Scientific Incorporated 3,426 

Taurus Products 2,094 

Taylor Forge Canada Limited 1,545 

Taylor Steel 1,025 

Tech Rep Electronics Limited 10,268 

Techneurop Incorporated 1,388 

Technical Marketing Associates 11,915 

Technical Marketing Association 18,164 

Technicare Corporation 5,203 

Technigraph MCS 4,468 

Teknor 2,174 

Tektronics Canada Incorporated 7,923 

Tele Metropole 2,853 

Tele — Radio Systems Limited 18,253 

Tele Syn Incorporee 1,807 

Telefix Canada 2,315 

Teleglobe Canada 27,453 

Telesat Canada 2,961 

Teletype Corporation 8,778 

Teltone Limited 3,409 

Telxon Canada Corporation 1,514 

Tencorr Packaging Incorporated 1,1 19 

Tenneco Chemical Incorporated 2,1 14 

Teradyac Corporation 9,025 

Teradyne CDA 2,879 

Teradyne Corporation of Canada Incorporated 5,949 

Termal Technics 2,007 

Terochem Laboratories Limited 4,081 

Terry Foods Management Limited 31,843 

Test Technology 4,052 

Tetrad Computer Applications 1,856 

Texcan Communications 6,443 

Textiles Dionne Incorporee 5,444 

THT Productions 1,901 

The Algoma Steel Corporation Limited 8,061 

The Canology Group Incorporated 1,745 

The General Hospital Corporation 1,243 

The Price Company Limited 3,722 

Therm — O — Disc Canada Limited 2,032 

Thermojet Incorporated 21,504 

Thompson CSF Canada Limited 53,217 

Thompson J Walter Limited 690,876 

Three— M Canada Limited 10,233 

Ticket Ron Incorporated 2,432 

Tilar Roofing Limited 1,869 

Tilco Plastics Limited 1,405 

Timna Rotational Molders 2,071 

Tioxide Canada Incorporated 3,61 1 

Tip Top Products 1,022 

Tomay Canada Limited 27,691 

Tonka Corporation 1,065,066 

Tony Canada Incorporated 3,634 

Torin Manufacturing (Canada) Limited 3,721 

Toronto General Hospital 1,909 

Toronto Star 66,373 

Toshiba International 2,876 

Tracan Electronics Corporation 2,525 

Trane Company of Canada Limited 12,186 

Trans Canada Pipelines 56,81 1 

Trans-Northern Pipeline Incorporated 1,721 

Transaita Utilities Corporation 4,104 

Transfab Electric 2,495 



Travenol Canada Limited 34,296 

Treck Photographic of Canada Limited 1,462 

Tri Canada Incorporated 4,494 

Tri Sure Products 4,395 

Tri-Steel Incorporated 1,264 

Tri-Way Machine Limited 18,573 

Trim Trend 63,050 

Trimac Transportation Systems 20,978 

Trio Tool and Mold Limited 1,283 

Trow Limited 3,006 

Tru— Die Limited 1,930 

Tucker Plastics Incorporated 45,984 

Tupperware Company A Division of Dart Industries 

Canada Limited 2,452,204 

Turner Mill Equipment 6,804 

TVW Paper Machinery Incorporated 141,523 

Twin Disc Incorporated 7,845 

Two's A Company 4,499 

UAP 5,723 

Ultratherm of Canada Limited 1,303 

Unico Incorporated 4,983 

Unicor Industries 17,603 

Union Carbide Canada Limited 41,907 

Union Oil Company of Canada Limited 6,514 

Uniroyal Limited 3,593 

Unit Rig and Equipment 24,190 

United Audio Visual Resources 1,358 

United Plastic Components 1,191 

United Technologies 4,967 

Universal Helicopters 5,264 

Universiade 83 Corporation 4,145 

Universite Laval 1,405 

University Hospital 2,255 

Unlimited Textures 8,858 

UPA Technology Incorporated 1,444 

US Instruments Rental 3,215 

VIP International 10.894 

Vac Services 27,318 

Valeniote Computer Services 1,353 

Valenite — Modco Limited 12,206 

Valley Oxygen 4,585 

Valmet Incorporated 9,942 

Valtrol Equipment 1,323 

Vancouver City Savings Credit Union 2,168 

Vannatter Limited HE 3,089 

Varian Canada Incorporated 12,81 1 

Varisystems Exploration Limited 35,256 

Versatile Manufacturing Limited 12,731 

Versatile Vickers 18,798 

Vestshell Incorporated 21,445 

Vetco Incorporated 45,572 

Victaulic Company of Canada 3,454 

Vida Systems Incorporated 8,719 

Video Production Association 249,350 

Viking Helicopters 4,692 

Visionair Incorporated 27,282 

Visway Leasing 19,081 

Vive Incorporated 1,330 

VME Associates 1,251 

Volkswagen Canada Limited 69,479 

Vollrath of Canada Limited 2,035 

W and G Instruments 5,678 

WH Voortman Limited 3,320 

WM Tool Company Limited 6,842 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



I3'17 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



WR Grace and Company 1,1 10 

WS Tyler Company Canada Limited 2,251 

Wabco Equipment 3,949 

Wafios Canada 1,159 

Wahl Clipper Corporation of Canada 2,925 

Wajax Industries Limited 80,905 

Walker Exhausts 1,020 

Wallace and Tierman 1,113 

Waiter Cabbot Construction 9,746 

Waterous GM Diesel Limited 3,186 

Waterville Celluar Products 15,161 

Wausau Insurance Company 8,562 

Webb Jervis B Limited 1,607 

Webster Instruments 6,000 

Welding, Douglas 2,331 

Welding, Mark 4,361 

Weldlow Systems of Canada Limited 3,723 

Weldwood of Canada 2,791 

Wells Fargo Alarm Services 1,847 

Westar Mining Limited 3,884 

Westcan Peripherals Limited 1,430 

Westchester Productions 5,01 1 

Westech Industrial Limited 1,109 

Westech Instruments Limited 5,977 

Western Star Incorporated 1,248 

Westinghouse Canada Incorporated 51,853 

Westroc Industries Limited 1,557 

Westronic Systems Limited 3,886 

Weyerhauser Canada Limited 2,808 

Whitewater Ski Society 10,913 

Wicor Canada Incorporated 14,898 

Wilier Engineering Limited 4,749 

William A Reynolds Associates 4,634 

Williams and Wilson Limited 15,371 

Wilson Machines 1,272 

Windier Electronic Company Limited 3,320 

Windsor Bumper Division/Gulf and Western 

(Canada) Limited 57,910 

Winnipeg Bank Note Company Limited 1,264 

Wood Enterprises 9,485 

Woodstream Corporation 143,912 

World Films Services Limited 6,240 

World Harvest Outreach 8,923 

World Wide Pictures 12,166 

Xerox of Canada Incorporated 9,567 

Yawanur Incorporated 1 13,230 

Year of the Dragon Productions 80,690 

Young, Ralph 7,142 

Younge and Rubicam 7,348 

Yule Hyde Associates Limited 3,020 

Yunti Micro Corporation 3,420 

Zalev Brothers Limited 12,157 

Zanin Electronics 1,098 

Zeiss Carl Canada Limited 6,723 

Zenith Data Systems 2,438 

Zenith Radio Canada Limited 1,687 

Zilog Incorporated 7,671 

Zumbach Electronics 2,351 

Zumro Company Incorporated 1 1,946 

Zymarck Corporation 2,835 

Remissions of less than $1,000 585,569 

42.621,789 



Tariff items 41100—1, 42700—1, 42700—2, 
42700—3, 42700—4, 42700—5, 42700—9, 
42700—10. 42700—11, 42700—12, 42700—13, 
42700—14, 42700—15, 42700—16, 42701—1, 
42701 — 2, and 42701 — 3 provide that in the case of 
the importation into Canada of any goods enumer- 
ated in the items, the Governor in Council, on the 
recommendation of the Minister of Department of 
Regional Industrial Expansion, may, whenever he 
considers that it is in the public interest and that the 
goods are not available from production in Canada, 
remits the duty specified in these items applicable to 
the goods. Remissions of duty are less the duty 
applicable to the first $500 of value for duty in 
respect of each application. The following remis- 
sions were granted on the recommendation of the 
Minister of Department of Regional Industrial 
Expansion and the Treasury Board under the provi- 
sions of the tariff items and represent customs duty 
on machinery and parts as described in various 
remission orders and schedules thereto, the amounts 
shown representing that portion of the remission 
applicable to the machinery and parts imported 
during the period of April I, 1984 and March 31, 
1985, inclusive: 



PC 1973—1066, May 8, 1973 

PC 1974—249, February 12, 1974 

PC 1974—397, February 26, 1974 

PC 1974—929, April 23, 1974 

PC 1974—1433, June 20, 1974 

PC 1974— 1434, June 20, 1974 

PC 1974—1658, July 23, 1974 

PC 1974— 1736, July 30, 1974 

PC 1974— 1823, August 6, 1974 

PC 1974—2064, September 17, 1974 
PC 1974— 2065, September 17, 1974 
PC 1974—2066, September 17, 1974 

PC 1974— 2242, October 8, 1974 

PC 1974—2427, November 5, 1974.... 
PC 1974—2520, November 19, 1974.. 

PC 1975—126, January 23, 1975 

PC 1975—187, January 28, 1975 

PC 1975—244, February 4, 1975 

PC 1975—409, February 25, 1975 

PC 1975—836, April 15, 1975 

PC 1975—837, April 15, 1975 

PC 1975—982, April 29, 1975 

PC 1975—1512, July 3, 1975 

PC 1975—1838, July 29, 1975 

PC 1975—2027, August 27, 1975 

PC 1975— 2388, October 9, 1975 

PC 1975— 2390, October 9, 1975 

PC 1975—2619, November 7, 1975... 
PC 1975—2805, December 2, 1975 ... 

PC 1976—93, January 20, 1976 

PC 1976—326, February 17, 1976 

PC 1976—1 1 10, May 1 1, 1976 

PC 1976— 1792, July 13, 1976 

PC 1976—2468, October 7, 1976 

PC 1976— 265 I.October 28, 1976 



1,790 
3,099 
2,573 
3,213 
3,889 
1,025 
1,505 
1,094 
1,083 
1,477 
3,609 
2,793 
1,187 
8,135 

13,897 
1,499 
9,307 
1,131 
4,748 
1,263 
2,682 
1,140 

15.127 

12.595 
4.743 
3.961 
1.002 
4.574 
1.425 
3.589 
1,937 

60,435 
9,284 
3,638 
5,134 



13'18 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



PC 1976—2936, November 25, 1976 1,683 

PC 1977—138 January 27, 1977 1,389 

PC 1977—140, January 27, 1977 43,478 

PC 1977—1250, May 5, 1977 1,135 

PC 1977—1418, May 19, 1977 1,795 

PC 1977—1736, June 23, 1977 4,689 

PC 1977—1927, July 7, 1977 3,000 

PC 1977—1928, July 7, 1977 1,722 

PC 1977—2896, October 13, 1977 4,546 

PC 1977—3042, October 27, 1977 1,542 

PC 1977—3182, November 10, 1977 4,535 

PC 1977—3244, November 17, 1977 3,327 

PC 1977—3372, December 1, 1977 9,679 

PC 1977—3625, December 22, 1977 1,194 

PC 1977—3626, December 22, 1977 1,442 

PC 1977—3629, December 22, 1977 2,622 

PC 1978—202, January 26, 1978 2,251 

PC 1978—690, March 7, 1978 7,251 

PC 1978—1665, May 18, 1978 5,696 

PC 1978—1823, June 1, 1978 2,087 

PC 1978— 2019, June 22, 1978 1,419 

PC 1978— 21 15, June 29, 1978 1,483 

PC 1978—21 16, June 29, 1978 2,441 

PC 1978—2240, July 13, 1978 1,213 

PC 1978—2316, July 25, 1978 1,233 

PC 1978— 2490, August 1, 1978 2,578 

PC 1978—2491, August 1, 1978 1,159 

PC 1978—2492, August 1, 1978 2,889 

PC 1978—2820, September 6, 1978 3,826 

PC 1978— 2864, September 13, 1978 1,526 

PC 1978—3064, October 4, 1978 1,465 

PC 1978—3145, October 12, 1978 1,334 

PC 1978—3423, November 9, 1978 3,256 

PC 1978—3554, November 23, 1978 1,310 

PC 1978—3753, December 12, 1978 1,481 

PC 1979—229, February 1, 1979 2,971 

PC 1979—318, February 13, 1979 141,194 

PC 1979—766, March 15, 1979 3,743 

PC 1979—1039, March 28, 1979 1,251 

PC 1979—1421, May 9, 1979 1,459 

PC 1979—1513, May 17, 1979 1,124 

PC 1979—1579, May 24, 1979 4,102 

PC 1979—1828, July 5, 1979 17,395 

PC 1979—1829, July 5, 1979 1,474 

PC 1979—1832, July 5, 1979 1,031 

PC 1979—1988, July 26, 1979 1,754 

PC 1979—2287, August 24, 1979 4,237 

PC 1979—2350, September 6, 1979 3,304 

PC 1979—2614, September 26, 1979 30,547 

PC 1979—2615, September 26, 1979 3,301 

PC 1979—2616, September 26, 1979 10,898 

PC 1979—2702, October 4, 1979 1,596 

PC 1979—2736, October 11, 1979 8,138 

PC 1979—2826, October 18, 1979 1,835 

PC 1979—2891, October 25, 1979 1,315 

PC 1979—3035, November 8, 1979 2,744 

PC 1979—3176, November 22, 1979 1,504 

PC 1979—3242, November 24, 1979 9,583 

PC 1979—3513, December 19, 1979 4,782 

PC 1979— 3514, December 19, 1979 1,157 

PC 1979—3518, December 19, 1979 2,396 

PC 1980—164, January 11, 1980 48,617 

PC 1980—448, February 8, 1980 15,768 

PC 1980—449, February 8, 1980 5,973 



PC 1980—450, February 8, 1980. 
PC 1980—685, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—687, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—688, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—690, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—691, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—693, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—696, March 20, 1980... 
PC 1980—798, March 27, 1980... 

PC 1980—936, April 10, 1980 

PC 1980— 1016, April 17, 1980... 

PC 1980—1129 

PC 1980—1234 

PC 1980—1235 

PC 1980—1308 

PC 1980—1362 

PC 1980—1518 

PC 1980—1570 

PC 1980—1647 

PC 1980—1648 

PC 1980—1785 

PC 1980—1845 

PC 1980—2072 

PC 1980—2073 

PC 1980—2074 

PC 1980—2075 

PC 1980—2204 

PC 1980—2384 

PC 1980—2451 

PC 1980—2452 

PC 1980— 2494 

PC 1980—2620 

PC 1980—2675 

PC 1980—2852 

PC 1980—2853 

PC 1980—2854 

PC 1980—2855 

PC 1980—3039 

PC 1980—3040 

PC 1980—3199 

PC 1980—3200 

PC 1980—3201 

PC 1980—3202 

PC 1980—3467 



May 1, 1980 

May 8, 1980 

May 8, 1980 

May 15, 1980 

May 22, 1980 

June 5, 1980 

June 5, 1980 

June 19, 1980 

June 19, 1980 

July 3, 1980 

July 10, 1980 

July 31, 1980 

July 31, 1980 

July 31, 1980 

July 31, 1980 

August 27, 1980 

August 27, 1980 

September 12, 1980 
September 12, 1980 
September 18, 1980 

October 2, 1980 

October 9, 1980 

October 23, 1980 

October 23, 1980 

October 23, 1980 

October 23, 1980 

November 6, 1980. .. 
November 6, 1980... 
November 27, 1980. 
November 27, 1980. 
November 27, 1980.. 
November 27, 1980. 
December 27, 1980.. 



PC 1981—35, January 8, 1981 

PC 1981—36, January 8, 1981 

PC 1981—37, January 8, 1981 

PC 1981—38, January 8, 1981 

PC 1981—228, January 29, 1981 .. 
PC 1981— 235, January 29, 1981.. 
PC 1981—297, February 5, 1981 .. 
PC 1981—435, February 19, 1981 

PC 1981—592, March 5, 1981 

PC 1981—593, March 5, 1981 

PC 1981—666, March 12, 1981 

PC 1981—667, March 12, 1981 

PC 1981—837, March 12, 1981 

PC 1981—905, April 2, 1981 

PC 1981— 978, April 9, 1981 

PC 1981—979, April 9, 1981 

PC 1981— 1183, May 7, 1981 

PC 1981— 1184, May 7, 1981 

PC 1981— 1185, May 7, 1981 

PC 1981— 1495, June 4, 1981 



2, 

4, 

2, 

2, 

3, 

12, 

7, 

1, 

2, 

25, 

7. 

133. 

3. 

21. 

24. 

16. 

3, 

2. 

13. 

2, 

11. 

6, 

29, 

17, 

2, 

4, 

11, 

7. 

24, 

8, 

39, 

15, 

2, 

11, 

64, 

8, 

1, 

53, 

15, 

76, 

255, 

9, 

58, 

43, 

62, 

28, 

23, 

44, 

113, 

193, 

152, 

61, 

90 

165, 

298, 

93, 

138, 

288, 

208, 

192, 

341, 

342, 

911, 

544, 



523 
,858 
008 
319 
,114 
,633 
,617 
,582 
,512 
,054 
,260 
,380 
,300 
,856 
,002 
,193 
,766 
,628 
,467 
,879 
,062 
,663 
,982 
,873 
,492 
,543 
,138 
,202 
,078 
,278 
,858 
,418 
,921 
,505 
,996 
,240 
,495 
,318 
,699 
,443 
,656 
,508 
,186 
,755 
,960 
,212 
,834 
,928 
,066 
,018 
,735 
,584 
,712 
,150 
,353 
,833 
,570 
,834 
,958 
,487 
,433 
,308 
,308 
,319 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



13' 19 



PC 1981 — 1496. June 4, 1981 

PC 1981— 1497, June 4, 1981 

PC 1981— 1555. June II. 1981 

PC 1981— 1649. June 18, 1981 

PC 1981 — 1734. June 25, 1981 

PC 1981 — 1961, July 16, 1981 

PC 1981 — 1962, July 16. 1981 

PC 1981— 2130, July 29, 1981 

PC 1981— 2131, July 29, 1981 

PC 1981— 2244. August 19. 1981 

PC 1981— 2245. August 19. 1981 

PC 1981— 2246. August 19. 1981 

PC 1981— 2395, September 3, 1981 . 
PC 1981— 2458. September 3. 1981 . 
PC 1981— 2550, September 16, 1981 
PC 1981—2630, September 23, 1981 

PC 1981—2738, October 8. 1981 

PC 1981— 2739, October 8, 1981 

PC 1981—3038, October 29. 1981 

PC 1981—3137. November 5, 1981 ... 
PC 1981—3265. November 19. 1981. 
PC 1981—3360. November 26, 1981. 
PC 1981—3423, December 3, 1981 ... 
PC 1981—3563, December 17, 1981 . 
PC 1981—3564. December 17, 1981 . 

PC 1982— 82, January 14, 1982 

PC 1982— 87, January 14, 1982 

PC 1982— 204, January 21, 1982 

PC 1982—264, January 28, 1982 

PC 1982—347. February 4. 1982 

PC 1982—397. February 11, 1982 

PC 1982—612. February 18. 1982 

PC 1982—698. March 4. 1982 

PC 1982—699. March 4. 1982 

PC 1982—861, March 18, 1982 

PC 1982—891, March 18. 1982 

PC 1982— 1007, April 1, 1982 

PC 1982—1074. April 8, 1982 

PC 1982— 1 187. April 22. 1982 

PC 1982— 1 188. April 22, 1982 

PC 1982—1304, April 29, 1982 

PC 1982—1344, May 6. 1982 

PC 1982—1461, May 13, 1982 

PC 1982—1527, May 20, 1982 

PC 1982—1598, May 27. 1982 

PC 1982— 1662, June 3, 1982 

PC 1982— 1729, June 12. 1982 

PC 1982— 1792, June 17, 1982 

PC 1982— 1959, June 30, 1982 

PC 1982— 2028, July 8, 1982 

PC 1982—2029, July 8, 1982 

PC 1982—2181. July 22. 1982 

PC 1982—2265. July 29. 1982 

PC 1982—2362. August 5, 1982 

PC 1982—2485, August 18, 1982 

PC 1982—2633, September 3, 1982 .. 
PC 1982— 2634, September 3, 1982 . 
PC 1982— 2759, September 9, 1982 .. 
PC 1982—2869, September 22, 1982 
PC 1982—2984, September 30, 1982 

PC 1982— 3145, October 14, 1982 

PC 1982—3202, October 21, 1982 

PC 1982—3374, November 4, 1982.... 
PC 1982—3375, November 4, 1982... 



650.149 PC 1982—3478. November 18. 1982 

599.568 PC 1982—3596. November 25, 1982 

.375.531 PC 1982—3672, December 2, 1982 1 

695,300 PC 1982—3792, December 9, 1982 

627,747 PC 1 982—3940, December 23, 1 982 

547,689 PC 1983—27, January 13, 1983 

332,910 PC 1983—28, January 13. 1983 

462,159 PC 1983— 2 17, January 27, 1983 I 

99,251 PC 1983—279, February 3, 1983 

405,980 PC 1983—459, February 17, 1983 

603,480 PC 1983—536. February 24, 1983 

558,712 PC 1983—668, March 3, 1983 1 

902,184 PC 1983—669. March 3, 1983 

591,409 PC 1983—710, March 10, 1983 

,978,1 17 PC 1983—767, March 17, 1983 

,441,723 PC 1983—851, March 24, 1983 

214,396 PC 1983—948, March 31, 1983 1 

869,350 PC 1983—1099, April 14, 1983 1 

,426,016 PC 1983— 1 177, April 21, 1983 1 

713,605 PC 1983—1322, May 5, 1983 

.166,298 PC 1983—1323, May 5, 1983 

,816,053 PC 1983—1399, May 12, 1983 

669,430 PC 1983—1508, May 19, 1983 

.227,273 PC 1983—1535, May 26. 1983 

.031,404 PC 1983—1714, June 9. 1983 

,377,069 PC 1983— 1785, June 16, 1983 

,490,580 PC 1983— 1870, June 23, 1983 

,547,407 PC 1983—2042, June 30, 1983 

532,772 PC 1983—2072, July 7, 1983 

,156,242 PC 1983—2345, July 27, 1983 

,197,897 PC 1983— 2484, August 10, 1983 

,412,343 PC 1983—2599, August 24, 1983 

,056,606 PC 1983— 2684, September 1, 1983 

.355.109 PC 1983— 2803, September 15. 1983 

,560,956 PC 1983— 2895, September 15. 1983 

.548,068 PC 1983—3168, October 13, 1983 

,399,317 PC 1983—3169, October 13, 1983 

,963,315 PC 1983—3170, October 13, 1983 

974,414 PC 1983—3349, October 27, 1983 

,049,877 PC 1983—3423, November 3, 1983 

,086,080 PC 1983—3548, November 17, 1983 

,886,328 PC 1983—3549, November 17, 1983 

,598,471 PC 1983—3669, November 24. 1983 

,546.504 PC 1983—3744, November 30, 1983 

,926,981 PC 1983—3855, December 8, 1983 

706,772 PC 1983—4021, December 15, 1983 

,081,196 PC 1983—4104. December 22, 1983 

657,384 PC 1984—50, January 1 1, 1984 

876,008 PC 1984 — 146, January 19, 1984 

,169,844 PC 1984—147, January 19, 1984 

,067,641 PC 1984—264, January 26, 1984 

,836,779 PC 1984—433, February 9, 1984 

,190,383 PC 1984 — 434, February 9, 1984 

799,196 PC 1984—525, February 16, 1984 

758.787 PC 1984—653, February 23, 1984 

,691.081 PC 1984—780, March 8, 1984 

547,380 PC 1984—874, March 15, 1984 

842,778 PC 1984—987, March 22, 1984 1 

,916,991 PC 1984—988, March 22, 1984 1 

,209,465 PC 1984—1076, March 29, 1984 1 

,162,509 PC 1984— 1 158, April 5, 1984 I, 

169.956 PC 1984— 1243. April 12, 1984 1, 

,248,683 PC 1984—1327, April 18, 1984 1, 

,314.826 PC 1984—1454, May 3, 1984 4, 



581.147 
732.613 
.209,362 
765,964 
822,447 
348,074 
597,336 
,165.212 
936,741 
221,545 
673.820 
,176,184 
721,130 
527,540 
459.337 
490,140 
,046,046 
,549,337 
,191,818 
381,523 
601,488 
668,694 
827,856 
876,445 
983,990 
436,203 
528,604 
511,821 
450,711 
,197,249 
,552,257 
.985,394 
.743,878 
843.145 
,449.654 
,155,702 
754,237 
406,754 
.935,210 
.598,961 
577,517 
613,824 
,031,991 
880,199 
,080,915 
,886,930 
,823,821 
,452,366 
,566,124 
877,669 
728,452 
,415,017 
,750,754 
,689,244 
,551,359 
,355,869 
918,267 
,716,838 
,819,775 
,397,543 
,652,272 
368,111 
164,772 
,447,382 



13-20 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1984—1556, May 10, 1984 2,743,017 

PC 1984—1685, May 17, 1984 1,342,292 

PC 1984—1772, May 24, 1984 1,267,090 

PC 1984—1984, June 7, 1984 2,432,776 

PC 1984— 2053, June 14, 1984 1,096,997 

PC 1984—2189, June 21, 1984 3,208,234 

PC 1984—2314, June 28, 1984 2,201,960 

PC 1984— 251 1, July 12, 1984 1,624,310 

PC 1984—2660, July 25, 1984 5,1 16,666 

PC 1984—2725, August 10, 1984 1,779,237 

PC 1984—2726, August 10, 1984 2,275,051 

PC 1984—2834, August 24, 1984 3,212,397 

PC 1984—2918, August 31, 1984 3,882,882 

PC 1984—3156, September 12, 1984 739,005 

PC 1984—3157, September 12, 1984 1,133,606 

PC 1984—3394, October 18, 1984 1,986,668 

PC 1984—3395, October 18, 1984 1,365,31 1 

PC 1984— 3396, October 18, 1984 1,456,275 

PC 1984—3397, October 18, 1984 1,179,096 

PC 1984—3635, November 8, 1984 1,597,787 

PC 1984—3636, November 8, 1984 796,546 

PC 1984—3747, November 22, 1984 806,392 

PC 1984—3896, December 6, 1984 1,299,959 

PC 1984—3978, December 6, 1984 2,349,526 

PC 1984—4097, December 20, 1984 410,471 

PC 1984—4098, December 20, 1984 1,175,597 

PC 1984—4099, December 20, 1984 1,227,185 

PC 1985—102, January 17, 1985 1,894,662 

PC 1985—295, January 31, 1985 1,009,751 

PC 1985—481, February 14, 1985 278,046 

PC 1985—482, February 14, 1985 548,865 

PC 1985—483, February 14, 1985 320,571 

PC 1985—637, February 28, 1985 400,898 

PC 1985—670, February 28, 1985 373,378 

PC 1985—1047, March 28, 1985 103,292 

PC 1985—1048, March 28, 1985 85,600 

Remissions of less than $1,000 56,677 

215.608.696 

PC 1971—2727, December 14, 1971, amended by 
PC 1973—4030, December 18, 1973, PC 1974— 
547, March 12, 1974, PC 1975—2943, December 
18, 1975, PC 1977—2546, September 15, 1977, PC 
1977—3373, December 1, 1977, PC 1979—3466, 
December 19, 1979 and PC 1981—69, January 15, 
1981, remits the duty payable under Schedule A of 
the Customs Tariff on certain parts classified under 
tariff item 42700—1 and 42701—1 entered for 
consumption: 

(a) in 1984 and that are for machines, or for acces- 
sories or attachments for machines, that were 
imported under a remission of duty authorized 
during 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 
1980; 

(b) in 1985 and that are for machines, or for acces- 
sories or attachments for machines, that were 
imported under a remission of duty authorized 
during 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980— 
$4,218,666; 

PC 1970—1200, July 8, 1970, remits the sales tax 
paid or payable on goods in respect of which cus- 
toms duties have been remitted pursuant to tariff 



item 42700 — 1 and which are entered for consump- 
tion on and after July 8, 1970, in an amount equal 
to the difference between the sales tax calculated on 
the duty paid value of the goods and the value for 
duty of the goods— $3,877,938: 

Tariff items 42700—1, 42700—2, 42700—3, 
42700—4, 42700—5, 42700—9, 42700—10, 
42700—11, 42700—12, 42700—13, 42700—14, 
42700—15, 42700—16, 42701—1, 42701—2, 
42701—3,41100—1: 



PC 1970—1200 
PC 1971—2727 



Customs duties, excise duties and sales tax on 
sales made to NATO Forces and/or NATO person- 
nel in Canada: 

Alberta Liquor Control Board, Edmonton, Alta 

British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch, Van- 
couver, BC 

Liquor Control Board of Ontario, Toronto, Ont 

New Brunswick Liquor Corporation, Fredericton, NB 
Newfoundland Liquor Corporation, St John's, Nfld .... 

Nova Scotia Liquor Commission, Halifax, NS 

Saskatchewan Liquor Board, Regina, Sask 

Societe des Alcools du Quebec, Montreal, Que 

Remission of customs duties on goods imported 
for processing and subsequent export: 

1 16879 Canada, Montreal, Que 

3M Canada Incorporated, London, Ont 

AHA Manufacturing Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 

AMF Canada Limited, Guelph, Ont 

ARD Industries Limited Friction Welding Division, 
Cambridge, Ont 

Aar-Kel Moulds Limited, Wallaceburg, Ont 

Abitibi-Price Incorporated, Grand Falls, Nfld 

Accurpress Manufacturing Limited, Richmond, BC .... 

Acme Manufacturing of Canada Limited, Kitchener, 
Ont 

Afton Operating Corporation, Kamloops, BC 

Aimco Automotive Division ITT Industries of Canada, 
Mississauga, Ont 

Air Canada, Dorval, Que 

Alberta Distillers Limited, Calgary, Alta 

Alcan Canada Products Limited, Kingston, Ont 

American Metal Spinning, Laval, Que 

AMF Tuboscope Incorporated, Edmonton, Alta 

Aradco Management Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Arconas Corporation, Mississauga, Ont 

Arpeco Engineering Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Artex Precast Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Audor Communications Incorporated, Ottawa, Ont .... 

Auto Pro Incorporated, St-Remi, Que 

Automation Air-Tel, Saint- Mathieu de Beloeil, Que .... 

Aviation Electrique Limited, St-Laurent, Que 

B and X Industries, Valleyfield, Que 

BC Timber, Castlegar, BC 

Bailey Controls Division Babcock and Wilcox, Burl- 
ington, Ont 



3,877,938 
4,218,666 
8.096.604 



63,836 

13,363 

36,277 

10,808 

5,521 

5,076 

1,125 

8,324 

144.330 



11,263 
189,621 
152,929 

65,811 

16,429 

910,124 

26,956 

24,614 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13'21 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

Bailey Controls Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,591 

Ballons Granger Balloons Incorporated, Montreal, 

Que 51,046 

Barlow Commercial Interiors, Toronto, Ont 2,893 

Bay Mills Limited, St Catharines, Ont 2,879,328 

Baycoat Limited, Hamilton, Ont 50,725 

BCL Magnetics Limited, Burlington, Ont 72,635 

Beaver Knitwear, Montreal, Que 7,650 

Beer Precast Concrete Limited, Scarborough, Ont 8,310 

Beloit Canada Limitee, Sorel, Que 5,996 

Bernard Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 7,049 

Berryland Canning, Haney, BC 160,978 

Best TH Printing Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 9,789 

Binder Tool and Mold Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 2,210,491 

Blackwood Hodge Equipment, Dorval, Que 38,531 

Blauer International, Montreal, Que 81,198 

Blue Bird International Incorporated, Brantford, Ont .. 1,531,908 

BM Dyeing Cie, Montreal, Que 5,360 

Bombardier Incorporated, Boucherville, Que 768,124 

Bombardier Incorporated, La Pocatiere, Que 3,497,070 

Bombardier Incorporated, Valcourt, Que 23,293 

Bomen Incorporated, Vanier, Que 12,135 

Bonne Bell of Canada Limited, Streetsville, Ont 25,834 

Bose Canada Incorporated, Ste-Marie, Que 423,415 

Bowater Newfoundland Limited, Corner Brook, Nfld .. 27,761 

Bradbury Company Limited, Scarborough, Ont 22,594 

Bristol-Myers Canada Incorporated, Belleville, Ont .... 62,528 
British American Bank Note Incorporated, Ottawa, 

Ont 58,606 

Brookside Farms, Abbotsford, BC 146,846 

Budd Canada Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont 42,396 

Build-A-Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 8,031 

Burcan Industries Limited, Whitby, Ont 54,877 

Burroughs Memorex, Winnipeg, Man 173,990 

CAE Electronics Limited, Montreal, Que 562,805 

CE Bauer, Montreal, Que 5,087 

C-E Peg Incorporated, Brantford, Ont 1 16,697 

CVL Rubber Industries Incorporated, Thorold, Ont .... 1,784 

CAE Machinery Limited, Burnaby, BC 302,600 

Caesar Canning Limited, Richmond, BC 46,529 

Camions Incendie, Pierreville, Que 205,610 

Camions Pierre Thibault Incorporee, Pierreville, Que .. 286,056 
Canada Hair Cloth Company Limited, St Catharines, 

Ont 26,841 

Canada Post Corporation, Ottawa, Ont 2,038 

Canada Vibac Tape, Montreal, Que 289,531 

Canadair, Montreal, Que 239,800 

Canadian Arsenals Limited, Ville Le Gardeur, Que .... 407,506 
Canadian Disposal Equipment Company Limited, 

Toronto, Ont 24,442 

Canadian Feed Screws Manufacturing Limited, 

Toronto, Ont 65,790 

Canadian. General Electric Company Limited, 

Toronto, Ont 86,877 

Canadian Lukens Limited, Rexdale, Ont 86,227 

Canadian Marconi, Montreal, Que 2,315,297 

Canadian Mist Distillers Limited, CoUingwood, Ont .... 4,859,492 
Canadian Steelmaster Company, Limited, Missis- 

sauga, Ont 146,612 

Canadian Timken Limited, St Thomas, Ont 4,400 

Canchilla Associates Limited, London, Ont 8,545 

Canco Cranes Limited, Vancouver BC 8,786 

Canterra Engineering Limited, Calgary, Alta 94,510 



Capital Disposal Equipment Incorporated, Rexdale, 

Ont 177,185 

Capsule Technology International Limited, Windsor, 

Ont 221,602 

Cardinal Clothes Incorporated, Montreal, Que 106,646 

Cardion Electronics DG Incorporated Division of Gen- 
eral Signal Limited, Carp, Ont 1,881 

Carrington Distillers Limited, Burlington, Ont 251,122 

Casa Interiors Limited, Montreal, Que 20,847 

Caterpillar of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ont 406,912 

Cavalier Tool and MEG Limited, Windsor, Ont 5,230 

Cegelec Industries, Laprairie, Que 100,040 

Celanese Canada Limited, Edmonton, Alta 424,637 

Center Tool and Mold Company Limited, Windsor, 

Ont 372,553 

Central Stampings Limited, Windsor, Ont 101,032 

Centre Nautique Gosselin Incorporee, St-Paul lie aux 

Noix, Que 17,761 

Cercast (1979) Incorporated, Montreal, Que 355,670 

Chemical Resin Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 120,163 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Ajax, Ont , 1,147,492 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 16,613,909 

CHT Steel Company, Richmond Hill, Ont 1 ,022,849 

Clark Equipment of Canada Limited, St Thomas, Ont 273,490 
Clay — Mill Technical Systems Incorporated, Windsor, 

Ont 46,266 

CML Northern Blower Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 42,845 
Coated Electrodes Division of Stanton Pipes Limited, 

Hamilton, Ont 225,193 

Codalex, Montreal, Que 53,445 

Collins and Aiken Incorporated, Farnhar, Que 437,086 

Cominco Limited, Trail, BC 131,569 

Compagnie Miniere IOC Limitee, Sept-fles, Que 4,191 

Computalog Gearhart Limited, Calgary, Alta 8,263 

Computing Devices Company, Ottawa, Ont 18,463 

Comptec International Limited, Burnaby, BC 81,621 

Contempra Mold Windsor Incorporated, La Salle, Ont 3,805 

Continuous Colour Coat Company, Rexdale, Ont 512,823 

Control Data Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ont 539,521 

Cooper Energy Services, Stratford, Ont 2,105,284 

Corma Incorporated, Concord, Ont 141,813 

Creations Americana Incorporee, Montreal, Que 81,761 

Creations Northwear Fashions, Montreal, Que 53,995 

Creo Electronics Corporation, Burnaby, BC 5,414 

Crown Flexpak Limited, Richmond, BC 28,754 

DEM Controls of Canada Limited, Montreal, Que 6,079 

Dafoe and Dafoe Incorporated, Brantford, Ont 95,975 

Dafoe and Dafoe Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 12,464 

Dart Machinery of Windsor, Windsor, Ont 4,585 

Decoustics Limited, Rexdale, Ont 139,031 

Degussa Canada Limited, Burlington, Ont 2,461,465 

Delaval Turbine Canada Limited, Maple, Ont 77,658 

Delta Furniture Company, Montreal, Que 7,754 

Delta 70 Manufacturing Limited, Windsor, Ont 17,186 

Dependable Turbines Limited, Port Moody, BC 5,184 

Diesel Division, GM of Canada Limited, London, Ont 2,339,390 

Diesel Equipment Limited, Toronto, Ont 562,356 

Digital Equipment of Canada Limited, Kanata, Ont .... 2,890,213 

Distex SNA Incorporated, Ville d'Anjou, Que 1 54,650 

Diversitel Communications Incorporated, Nepean, 

Ont 1.340 

Dofasco Incorporated, Hamilton, Ont 643,550 

Dominion Bridge Sulzer Incorporated, Lachine, Que .. 24,1 13 



13-22 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



Dominion Forge Company Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Dominion General Manufacturing Limited, Rexdale, 
Ont 

Dominion Lock, Montreal, Que 

Donlee Manufacturing Industries Limited, Weston, 
Ont 

Drassback North American Incorporated, Ottawa, 
Ont 

Dresden Industrial Company (Canada) Limited, 
London, Ont 

Dresser Canada Incorporated, Lethbridge, Alta 

Dualco Manufacturing Limited, Calgary, Alta 

DuPont Canada Incorporated, Maitland, Ont 

Dyer Equipment Incorporated, Calgary, Alta 

E and M Precast Limited, Rexdale, Ont 

EH Ferree Company Limited, Niagara Falls, Ont 

ER St Denis and Sons Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Ebco Industries, Richmond, BC 

Edac Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Edoco Manufacturing Corporation, Vancouver, BC .... 

Eden Packaging Limited, Niagara Falls, Ont 

El — Chem Construction Company Limited, Burling- 
ton, Ont 

Electrical Contact Limitee, Hanover, Ont 

Erco Industries Limited, Long Harbour, Nfld 

Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited, Midland, Ont 

Esco Limited, Port Hope, Ont 

Euclid Canada Limited, Guelph, Ont 

Eureka Coach Company Limited, Downsview, Ont 

Everingham Brothers Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Evin Industries Limited, Montreal, Que 

Exeltor Incorporated, Bedford, Que 

Export Scovill Limited, Montreal, Que 

F Jos Lamb Company Limited, Windsor, Ont 

FH Welding Machines Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Fabricated Steel Products (Windsor) Limited, Wind- 
sor, Ont 

Fabtron Corporation, St-Laurent, Que 

Fenetres et Vitraux CM Limitee, Montreal, Que 

Fibracan Incorporated, Laval, Que 

Field Aviation Company Limited, Calgary, Alta 

Flyer Industries Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Formac Yachting, Montreal, Que 

Foxboro Canada, La Salle, Que 

Freedland Industries Limited, Kingsville, Ont 

Freightliner of Canada Limited, Burnaby, BC 

Furnitrad Incorporated, St-Hyacinthe, Que 

GEC Diesels Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

GLC Canada, Berthierville, Que 

GPL Yachting Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

GacoSternson Limited, Brantford, Ont 

Gagnon Laforest, Montreal, Que 

Garlock de Sherbrooke Limitee, Sherbrooke, Que 

Gearcraft Machines Corporation, Cambridge, Ont 

General Kinetics Engineering Corporation, Toronto, 
Ont 

General Wire and Cable Company Limited, Cobourg, 
Ont 

Glegg Water Conditioning Incorporated, Guelph, Ont 

Glegg Water Conditioning Incorporated, London, Ont 

Glenayre Electronics, North Vancouver, BC 

GPL Treatment Limited, Abbotsford, BC 

Grand Falls Industries, Grand Falls, NB 



$ $ 

19,674 Greater Canada Colour Printing Limited, Stevensville, 

Ont 261,052 

315,990 Gulf Plastics Limited, Burnaby, BC 3,753 

29,988 HE Vannatter Limited, Wallaceburg, Ont 1,326,236 

Hallmark Tools Limited, Windsor, Ont 57,928 

20,463 Hepburn John T Limited, Toronto, Ont 284,596 

Herro Machinery Limited, Toronto, Ont 41,819 

2,355 Heuga Canada Limited, Cornwall, Ont 32,339 

Hewko Tool and Mold Limited, Oldcastle, Ont 11,161 

8,190 Heyme Wood Products Limited, Amherstburg, Ont .... 7,542 

21,953 Highway Stamping (Windsor) Limited, Tecumseh, 

17,323 Ont 226,434 

142,908 Hiram Walker and Sons Limited, Windsor, Ont 2,354,548 

109,104 Hamnar Home Equipment, Kitchener, Ont 165,798 

127,703 Holiday Juice Company, Windsor, Ont 39,103 

187,186 Holmes Foundry Limited, Sarnia, Ont 691,080 

17,762 Hownet Thermatech, Boucherville, Que 247,199 

607,592 Huron Steel Products (Windsor) Limited, Windsor, 

127,803 Ont 78,637 

9,365 Husky Injection Moulding Systems Limited, Bolten, 

270,433 Ont 247,050 

IBM Canada Limited, Bromont, Que 209,374 

30,841 IBM Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 9,635,268 

242,846 IIL Incorporated, Weston, Ont 7,349 

506,390 Idacom Electronics Limited, Edmonton, Alta 7,751 

99,893 Ideal Mold Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 1 13,870 

22,637 Imapro Incorporated, Charlottetown, PEI 8,912 

86,684 Imasa Limited, Montreal, Que 146,533 

453,092 IMO Foods Limited Canada, Yarmouth, NS 31,580 

88,357 Imperial Flavours Incorporated, Mississauga, Ont 738,935 

14,397 Imperial Mold Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 1,243 

1 18,446 IMW Industries Incorporated, Montreal, Que 339,556 

2, 1 37 Industrial Alloys Limited, Toronto, Ont 97,047 

5,027,163 Industries de Metaux Noranda, Montreal, Que 22,591 

29,412 Industries NRC Incorporee, Quebec, Que 11,859 

Inmont Canada Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 21,999 

260,996 Inovative Metal Incorporated, Rexdale, Ont 192,539 

63,888 Intasco Corporation, London, Ont 3,029 

1,843 Interfriction Canada, Ville d'Anjou, Que 50,119' 

62,472 Interiors International Limited, Weston, Ont 240,649 

2,453 Interlux Trimming, Montreal, Que 6,182 

26,903 International Controls Limited, Oldcastle, Ont 33,975 

39,823 International Submarine Engineering Limited, Van- 

13,248 couver, BC 27,697 

1,656,293 InternationalTools(1973)Limited, Windsor, Ont 2,521,849 

1,639 Iron Ore Company of Canada, Sept-Iles, Que 318,474 

25,307 Isomedix Corporation, Whitby, Ont 1,270,722 

1 3,057 ITT Aimco — A Division of ITT Industries, Toronto, 

363,251 Ont 1,977 

36,647 JIC Electric Canada, Windsor, Ont 13,255 

398,775 JTL Machine Limited, Port Colborne, Ont 38,597 

3,797 Jacob Brothers Machine Works, Richmond, BC 3,010 

5,075 Jeep Corporation, London, Ont 4,122,624 

11,585 JudHcks Enterprises Limited, Windsor, Ont 196,208 

KSR Industrial, Ridgetown, Ont 7,721 

31,410 Kasle Steel, Windsor, Ont 345,060 

Kendan Manufacturing Limited, Windsor, Ont 1,243,944 

2,323 Keuffel and Esser Canada Incorporated, Granby, Que 43,782 

24,74 1 Kimberly Clark of Canada Limited, Winkler, Man 2 1 ,209 

6,052 Kolmar of Canada Limited, Barrie, Ont 48,204 

178,574 Krug Furniture, Kitchener, Ont 77,691 

218,169 Kuipcrs Computer Recycling Services Limited, 

18,740 St-Laurent, Que 2,364 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 



13*23 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 

$ 

La Brasserie Labatt, La Salle, Que 24,039 

La Compagnie de Papier QNS Limitee, Baie Comeau, 

Que 154,798 

La Compagnie Seagram, La Salle, Que 451,442 

La Rechaperie Enregistree, Beauceville, Que 2,895 

Lab Volt, Ste-Foy, Que 13,715 

Lamb Systems Group Division of F Jos Lamb Com- 
pany Limited, Windsor, Ont 675,483 

Lamko Tool and Mould Incorporated, London, Ont .... 1,342,459 
LaSalle Machine Tool of Canada Limited, Tecumseh, 

Ont 756,459 

Laval Tool and Mold Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 224,516 

Lawn Furniture Canada Incorporated, Montreal, Que 101,098 

Law Furniture Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 2,968 

Lawson Packaging Limited, Montreal, Que 8,675 

Le Groupe Christie Limitee, St-Eustache, Que 708,258 

Le Manufacturier Grandford Incorporee, St-Alphonse 

deGranby, Que 11,307 

LeBlanc and Royle Communications Incorporated, 

Oakville,Ont 33,844 

Les Carrosseries Fontaine 1979 Limitee, Cowansville, 

Que 420,381 

Les Carrosseries Parco Incorporee, Granby, Que 8,690 

Les Emballages Lawson, Montreal, Que 1 19,269 

Les Entreprises Andre Tougas, St-Jean, Que 2,399 

Les Entreprises Electro, Brossard, Que 1 04,677 

Les Industries Sefina Limitee, St-Laurent, Que 22,737 

Les Paneaux Vic Ply Incorporee, Montreal, Que 65,1 19 

Leslee Sports Importing (Brockville) Limited, Brock- 

ville, Ont 50,656 

Leyland Industries Limited, Richmond, BC 16,809 

Linamar Machine Limited, Ariss, Ont 124,854 

Line Canada Limitee, Granby, Que 19,693 

Lockwood Manufacturing Incorporated, Brantford, 

Ont 32,463 

Lornex Mining, Logan Lake, BC 46,629 

M and M Mechanicals and Electricals Specialties, 

Guelph, Ont 4,678 

M and R Industrial Service, London, Ont 10,639 

MA Brian Company Limited, Windsor, Ont 13,383 

MGW Controls Limited, Windsor, Ont 2,595 

MacDonald Detweiler and Associates Limited, Rich- 
mond, BC 26,323 

Machine Fittings Limited, Lachine, Que 7,406 

Machinerie Tenco Limitee, St-Valerien, Que 40,861 

Manufacturier Grandford Incorporee, St-Alphonse de 

Granby, Que 359,549 

Marhagen Incorporated, Montreal, Que 3,282 

Marimac Textiles, St-Laurent, Que 58,287 

Marina Gagnon, St-Paul lie aux Noix, Que 8,015 

Master Machine and Duplicating (Windsor) Incorpo- 
rated, Windsor, Ont 74,920 

Materiel Transport Bombardier Limitee, Kamouraska, 

Que ...: 83,257 

Matt's Manufacturing Limited, Calgary, Alta 3,057 

McCurdy Radio Industries, Toronto, Ont 5,210 

McGaw Manufacturing Division of McGaw Supply 

Limited, Brantford, Ont 36,852 

Mclnnis Material Handling Systems, Windsor, Ont .... 9,142 

McQueen's Boatworks Limited, Vancouver, BC 23,773 

MDA Technologies Limited, Richmond, BC 5,098 

Mercedes Textiles Limited, Hawkesbury, Ont 31,599 

Metal St-Jean Incorporee, St-Jean, Que 37,816 

Metalex Products Limited, Richmond, BC 13,747 



$ 

Metric Mold, Windsor, Ont 2,41 1 

Metro Graphic Corporation, Laval, Que 21,718 

Metropolitan Distribution Services, Vancouver, BC 8,798 

Meubles JPM Gervais Incorporee, St-Cesaire, Que 15,782 

Michelin Tires (Canada) Limited, New Glasgow, NS.. 428,837 

Microtel Limited, Brockville, Ont 64,194 

Mil Industriel, Montreal, Que 47,224 

Modern Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 173,548 

Mohawk Oil Company Limited, North Vancouver, BC 13,361 

Molson Breweries Ontario Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,323 

Montreal Fast Print, Montreal, Que 128,237 

Mbosehead Breweries Limited, Dartmouth, NS 73,004 

Moosehead Breweries Limited, Saint John, NB 463,096 

Moteurs Leroy Somer du Canada Limitie, Granby, 

Que 439,412 

Motor Coach Industries Limited, Winnipeg, Man 134,089 

Mrs Milne's Cannery, Summerland, BC 22,1 10 

MSA Tire Limited, Bramalea, Ont 165,246 

Namasco Incorporated, Burlington, Ont 798,540 

National Sample Card Company, Montreal, Que 46,437 

Nautilus Yachting Limitee, Montreal, Que 34,615 

Nelbro Packing Limited, Steveston, BC 512,607 

Neo Industries Limited, Hamilton, Ont 897,286 

Newcor Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 121,503 

Newmont Mines Limited, Princeton, BC 1 1,109 

Nicholson Murdie, Victoria, BC 8,060 

Noranda Metal Industries Limited, Montreal, Que 82,031 

Norsat International Incorporated, Surrey, BC 575,013 

Northern Telecom Canada Limited, Aylmer, Que 727,776 

Northern Telecom Canada Limited, Belleville, Ont 14,707 

Northern Telecom Canada Limited, Islington, Ont 1,146,333 

Northern Telecom Canada Limited, Winnipeg, Man .. 154,275 

Northern Telecom, Montreal, Que 565,680 

Northridge Plastics Limited, Northridge, Ont 12,803 

Novatel Communications, Montreal, Que 495,733 

NYAB Vicom Division of General Signal Limited, 

Kingston, Ont 42,058 

Nystone Chemicals Limited, Debert, NS 1,347 

Omega Tool Limited, Oldcastle, Ont 6,309 

Otema Store Fixtures Limited, Toronto, Ont 6,839 

Outboard Marine Corporation of Canada Limited, 

Peterborough, Ont 106,768 

Pacific Automation Instruments Limited, Vancouver, 

BC 2,227 

Paragon Tool Division North American Plastics, 

Windsor, Ont 1,831,823 

Paul Demers et Fils, Beloeil, Que 6,206 

Peelco Manufacturing Limited, Oakville, Ont 3,816 

Peterson Metal Products Limited, Coquitlam, BC 5,185 

Photo Chemical Research Association Incorporated, 

London, Ont 21,970 

Plastics Division Butler Metal Products, Cambridge, 

Ont 235,719 

Pluswood Manufacturing Limited, Atikokan, Ont 69,495 

Polywrap Product of Canada, Montreal, Que 186,598 

Potter Distilleries, St Catharines, Ont 214,707 

Power Motion Manufacturing Limited, London, Ont .. 2,462 

PPG Industries Canada Limited, London, Ont 63,014 

Pratt and Withney, Longueuil, Que 86,809 

Precision Spring of Canada Limited, Amherstburg, 

Ont 154,345 

Prestcold North America, St-Laurent, Que 565,078 

Process Technology Limited, Oromocto, NB 26,904 

Produits Griffin, Granby, Que 13,064 



13-24 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Co/i///iMe^ 



Progress Plastics Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Propak Systems Limited, Airdrie, Alta 

Protein Foods Corporation Limited, Hamilton, Ont 

Provincial Crane Amca Heavy Equipment Limited, 
Niagara Falls, Ont 

Pure Metal Galvanizing (PMT), Rexdale, Ont 

Quebec Gear Works Limited, St-Laurent, Que 

Ram Air Manufacturing, London, Ont 

Rapid Industrial Textile Limited, Stoney Creek, Ont .. 

Rayco Stamping Products Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Raymond Industrial Equipment Limited, Brantford, 
Ont 

REF Automation Limited, Downsview, Ont 

Regal Tool and Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Reliable Communications and Power Products Lim- 
ited, Calgary, Alta 

Rex Tool and Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Richler Hydraulics Incorporated, St-Laurent, Que 

Richmond Pump, Richmond, BC 

Ricwil Limited, St Thomas, Ont 

Riello Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Robert Mitchell, St-Laurent, Que 

Rockwell International Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Ross Ellis Limited, Montreal, Que 

Royal Canadian Mint, Winnipeg, Man 

Royal Plastics Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Rumble Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

SVP Yachting Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

SWF Automotive Products, Toronto, Ont 

Schegel Canada Incorporated, Oakville, Ont 

Schenley Canada Incorporated, Valleyfield, Que 

Sedd Exo, Montreal, Que 

Shaw-Almex Industries Limited, Parry Sound, Ont 

Shellcast Foundries Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Sheres Company, Ville D'Anjou, Que 

Siemens Electric Limited, Pointe Claire, Que 

Signtech Incorporated, Mississauga, Ont 

Singer Company, St-Jean, Que 

SKD Manufacturing Company Limited, Amherst- 
burg, Ont 

Ski Rossignol Canada Limitee, Granby, Que 

Skykeesh Industries Limited, Vankleek Hill, Ont 

Smith and Nephew Incorporated, Lachine, Que 

Snazz Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Soudex Vinyl Canada, Montreal, Que 

Spencer Boats Limited, Richmond, BC 

Spore Boat Builders, Richmond, BC 

Sportif Manufacturing Canada Incorporated, Vancou- 
ver, BC 

St Clair Tool and Die Limited, Wallaceburg, Ont 

Stanbel Limitee, Montreal, Que 

Star Slipper Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Steelplast Canada Limitee, Granby, Que 

Stephens Adamson Division of AUis-Chalmers Canada 
Incorporated, Belleville, Ont 

Sterile Pharmaceuticals Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Sterling Automotive Supplies Incorporated, Windsor, 
Ont 

Stork Werkspoor Canada Limited, Sorel, Que 

Storburn Limited, Grimsby, Ont 

Stowe Woodward Company Limited, Sherbrooke, Que 

Strudex Fibres Limited, Waterloo, Ont 

Superior Coach Manufacturing Limited, (Canada), 
Winnipeg, Man 

Superior Emergency Equipment, Red Deer, Alta 



$ $ 

30,004 Synkoloid Company of Canada, Surrey, BC 59,701 

75,381 Syntex Bag Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 177,853 

101,624 TRW Repa Canada Limited, Belleville, Ont 210,948 

Tahsis Company, Vancouver, BC 170,747 

450,174 Taltek Electronics Limited, Montreal, Que 67,959 

5.825 Tannereye Limited, Charlottetown, PEI 443,663 

42,674 Techmire Limited, Anjou, Que 10,595 

321,765 Technimeca Limited, St-Laurent, Que 17,380 

103,961 Techwest Enterprises Limited, Vancouver, BC 8,214 

16,469 Tecton Industries, Longueuil, Que 1,874 

Telesat Canada, Vanier, Ont 122,630 

812,214 Texcom Marketing Incorporated, Markham, Ont 33,739 

162,687 The Canadian Salt Company Limited, Windsor, Ont .. 9,267 

87,175 The Seagram Company Limited, Waterloo, Ont 2,772,502 

The Valley City Manufacturing Company Limited, 

73,375 Dundas, Ont 25,538 

1 5,484 Thomas Built Buses of Canada Limited, Woodstock, 

49,473 Ont 1,393,129 

2,186 Ti Titanium, St-Laurent, Que 14,024 

81,885 Tideco Industry Division of Tidy Welders Limited, 

319,038 Langley, BC 176,114 

1 69,970 Tie Communication Canada, Sherbrooke, Que 335,114 

1,578,203 Tilbes Manufacturing Company, St-Laurent, Que 35,691 

80,056 Tioxide Canada Incorporated, Montreal, Que 7,830 

95,105 Toledo Scale Division Reliance Electric Limited, 

49,771 Windsor, Ont 168,893 

27,134 TraneCompany of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 135,075 

154,541 Travel Tips Limited, Oakville, Ont 1,900 

210,872 Trenton Works Division of Hawker Siddeley Canada 

45,723 Incorporated, Trenton, NS 2,709 

177,706 Tri-Canada Incorporated, Mississauga, Ont 34,416 

22,488 Tri-Star Industries Limited, Yarmouth, NS 2,600 

29,900 Tri-Steel Incorporated, Montreal, Que 11,139 

6.826 Tri-Tec Controls Limited (Division of John H Wilson 

2,956 Electric), Windsor, Ont 8,348 

23,123 Tri-Way Machine Limited, Windsor, Ont 359,568 

593,777 Trio Tool and Mold Limited, Windsor, Ont 32,994 

32,513 Tripar Incorporated, Montreal, Que 6,076 

TRW Repa Canada, Belleville, Ont 1 24,347 

561,049 Tye Sil Corporation, Montreal, Que 24,317 

36,927 Unique Tool and Gauge Incorporated, Windsor, Ont .. 10,939 

19,761 Uniroyal Limited, Kitchener, Ont 313,170 

494,953 Uniroyal Limited, Montreal, Que 22,582 

11,819 Uniroyal, Toronto, Ont 75,724 

7,018 United Tire and Rubber Company, Rexdale, Ont 83,369 

7,850 Unitog Canada Limited, Hamilton, Ont 12,923 

6,633 Univac Development, Dorval, Que 678,683 

Universal Package, Montreal, Que 253,575 

92,500 Universal Telecommunication, Pointe-Claire, Que 270,256 

344,865 Unlimited Textures Company Limited, Windsor, Ont.. 568,684 

3,865 Utah Mines, Vancouver, BC 698,860 

166,129 Vacuum Platers, Montreal, Que 1,184 

13,452 Valera Electronics Incorporated, Brockville, Ont 19,768 

Valiant Machine and Tool Incorporated, Windsor, 

218,869 Ont 60,355 

191,323 Varta Batteries Limited, Toronto, Ont 4,671 

Velan Engineering, Granby, Que 608,471 

23,216 Velan Engineering, St-Laurent, Que 931,053 

29,560 Vestshell Incorporated, Montreal, Que 64,559 

7,741 Vickers Canada, Montreal, Que 15,181 

61,693 Vonella — Angileri Clothing Manufacturing Incorpo- 

82.314 rated, Windsor, Ont 105,267 

Vulcan Equipment Company Limited, Scarborough, 

178,348 Ont 12,740 

38,966 WT Lynch Foods Limited, Toronto, Ont 26,221 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*25 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



$ 

Walinga Body and Coach Limited, Guelph, Ont 19L693 

Waterville Cellular Products Limited, Waterville, Que 56,583 

Weber Tool and Mold Limited, Midland, Ont 8,409 

Welles Corporation Limited, Windsor, Ont 237,292 

Western Timber Limited, Castelgar, BC 92,697 

Westinghouse Canada Limited, Hamilton, Ont 852,510 

Wide Lite Limited, London, Ont 35,542 

William Switzer and Associates Limited, Vancouver, 

BC 50,323 

Willowglen Systems Limited, Calgary, Alta 5,494 

Wiliowglen Systems Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,161 

Wilson Machines Company, La Salle, Que 174,303 

Windsor Match Plate and Tool Limited, Windsor, Ont 12,636 

Windsor Mold Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 68,261 

Wolverine Division UOP Limited, London, Ont 7,922 

Worthington Canada Incorporated, Brantford, Ont 31,372 

XTC Industries Limited, Maple Ridge, BC 1,628 

Xypex Chemicals Canada Limited, Richmond, BC 6,572 

Remissions of less than $1,000 52,819 

148.104.305 

General: 

PC 1952—1945, April 4, 1952, goods for sale, use 
or free distribution by the United Nations or its 
agents: 

Canadian Unicef Committee, Toronto, Ont 23,154 

PC 1959—1624, December 22, 1959, authorized 
in respect of goods donated by persons resident 
abroad to religious, charitable and educational insti- 
tutions in Canada, a remission of customs duty and 
excise taxes and in respect of items of official militia 
uniform dress or accoutrement not available in 
Canada, a remission upon importation, of customs 
duty otherwise payable: 

Baptist International Missions of Canada Incorpo- 
rated, Dinorwic, Ont 5,346 

British Columbia Soccer Associations, Vancouver, BC 1 ,230 

Calgary Highlanders, Calgary, Alta 2,155 

Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Day Saints, Coutts, 

Alta 9,406 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, North 

Vancouver, BC 7,782 

Ducks Unlimited (Canada) Limited, Winnipeg, Man .. 3,679 

Epilepsy Association, Toronto, Ont 1,077 

Gurdwara Nanaksar, Richmond, BC 1,652 

Holy Spirit Association, Toronto, Ont 6,701 

Les Apotres de I'Amour Infinie, St-Sauveur, Que 5,156 

Northern Light Gospel Mission, Red Lake, Ont 13,729 

Northern Youth Programs Incorporated, Dryden, Ont 19,027 

Parish of St Benedict, Rexdale, Ont 2,644 

Ronald MacDonald House, Saskatoon, Sask 4,490 

The Apostles of Infinite Love, St-Jovite, Que 1,953 

The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa, Ottawa Ont 1 ,375 

The Corporation of the Presbyterian Church of Latter 

Day Saints, Toronto, Ont 8,623 

University of MacMaster, Hamilton, Ont 17,289 

University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont 1,174 

University of Western, London, Ont 3,188 

Vancouver Sea Festival Society, Vancouver BC 1 ,352 

Young Life of Canada, Vancouver, BC 1 1 ,484 

Remissions of less than $ 1 ,000 10,804 

141,316 



PC 1963—15/1854, December 20, 1963, remis- 
sion of customs duties and excise taxes in respect of 
machinery and apparatus and parts thereof (includ- 
ing motive power) of a class or kind not made in 
Canada and drilling mud, when imported or divert- 
ed for use exclusively in the extraction of potash 
from an underground deposit by the solution 
method: 



Kalium Chemicals, Division of PPG 
Canada, Limited, Regina, Sask 



Industries, 



PC 1964—235, February 13, 1964, remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes on goods that are 
not as ordered: 

Remissions 

PC 1965—1143, June 21, 1965, remission of all 
duty specified in Schedule "A" of the Customs 
Tariff that is payable in respect of vehicles of the 
following class, namely, specified commercial vehi- 
cles, and in respect of all parts and accessories and 
parts thereof, for such vehicles, except tires, tubes 
and machines or other articles required by Tariff 
Item 438a to be valued separately under the tariff 
items regularly applicable thereto: 

King Seagrave (1982) Incorporated, Woodstock, Ont .. 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1965—1144, June 21, 1965, remission of all 
duty specified in Schedule "A" of the Customs 
Tariff that is payable in respect of specified com- 
mercial vehicles, and in respect of all parts and 
accessories and parts thereof, for such vehicles: 

King Seagrave (1982) Incorporated, Brampton, Ont.... 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Brampton, Ont 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Burnaby, BC 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Oakville, Ont 

Mack Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

PC 1966—2184, November 24, 1966, remission 
of customs duty and partial tax on defence supplies: 

Department of National Defence, Ottawa, Ont 

PC 1966—19/2200, December 1, 1966, author- 
ized the remission of customs duty and excise taxes 
on passover bread or matzos imported for use during 
the Passover holidays and entered at customs during 
the period commencing two months prior to the eve 
of the Passover festival and terminating on the last 
day of the festival: 

Allied Food Distributors Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Bartons Bonbonniere Incorporee, Montreal, Que 

Best Kosher Products, Montreal, Que 

Cite Cachere Incorporee, Montreal, Que 

Cosmopolitan Foods Limited, Richmond, BC 

E Schwartz Grocery, Montreal, Que 

Export Packers Company Limited, Bramalea, Ont 

Gila Food Products, Toronto, Ont 

Harmony Distributors Incorporated, Downsview, Ont.. 



83,507 



1,245,369 



86,667 

306 

86,973 



7,500 
34,481 

58,872 

579,285 

19,138 

3,791,562 

4.490.838 



13,372,882 



64,267 
2,240 
3,851 
4,851 
1,515 
2,450 
1,390 
1,624 
2,637 



13*26 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Hattamovitch Kosher Imports, Montreal, Que 

Holtzhenser Brothers Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Home Made Kosher Bakery Limited, Montreal, Que .. 
Kofman and Barenholtz Foods Limited, St-Leonard, 

Que 

Kofman Barenholtz Foods Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Koffman Foods Limited, Richmond, BC 

Loblaws Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Loblaws Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Star Appetizer Limitee, St-Leonard, Que 

Steinberg Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Supreme Foods (Ontario) Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Tou Confectionaries, Montreal, Que 

Weidman Foods Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1967—30/128, January 26, 1967, remission of 
customs duty and excise taxes payable on goods 
imported for use by the International Pacific 
Salmon Fisheries Commission: 

International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission, 
New Westminster, BC 

PC 1967—38/393, March 2, 1967, authorized 
remission effective January 1, 1967, to Canadian 
distillers the duty payable on used white oak whis- 
key barrels imported into Canada for Export pro- 
duction purposes and the amount of sales tax be- 
tween the sales tax payable on the duty paid value 
and that calculated on the value for duty: 



Alberta Distillers Limited, Calgary, Alta 

Canadian Mist Distillers Limited, Collingwood, Ont. 
Gilbey Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 



PC 1967—489, March 16, 1967, remission of all 
duty specified in Schedule "A" of the Customs 
Tariff that is payable in respect of buses and in 
respect of all parts and accessories and parts thereof 
for use in the manufacture of bodies for buses: 



Motor Coach Industries Limited, Winnipeg, Man 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1967—24/1621, August 23, 1967, remission 
of the customs duty and excise taxes which might 
Otherwise be payable in respect of equipment 
(including dredges, barges, tugs, scows or motor 
vessels) materials or supplies used or consumed for 
and in connection with the maintenance of the 
navigational channels in the international Section of 
the St-Lawrence Seaway: 

Robco Incorporated, Montreal, Que 



PC 1967—27/1778, October 3, 1967, 65% of the 
customs duty and excise taxes payable by the 
Department of National Defence on replacement 
parts for seven CI 17 Falcon aircraft: 

Department of National Defence, Ottawa, Ont 



$ 

93,918 
4,799 
1,623 

3,156 

135,010 

6,214 

3,038 

1,626 

7,963 

1,447 

58,914 

4,460 

24,383 

11,345 

442,721 



2,588 



4,196 
24,220 

2,606 
31,022 



4,620,236 

164 

4,620,400 



18,217 



PC 1967—2207, November 23, 1967, remission 
of customs duty on certain motor vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof: 

International Harvester Company of Canada Limited, 
Chatham, Ont 

International Harvester Company of Canada Limited, 
Hamilton, Ont 

PC 1968—24/185, February 1, 1968, remission of 
the customs duties otherwise payable on goods, tool- 
ing, ground support equipment, and initial support 
spares for use in the development, manufacture and 
initial activation of F5 and T38 type aircraft: 

Canadair, St-Laurent, Que 

PC 1968—23/1710, September 17, 1968, remis- 
sion of the customs duties payable on goods, tooling, 
ground support equipment and support spares for 
use in the development, manufacture and activation 
of the AN/USD-501 surveillance drone systems: 

Canadair, St-Laurent, Que 

PC 1969—1224, June 17, 1969, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes in respect of certain 
goods used for the NATO Infrastructure Project: 

Canadian Liquid Air Limited, Montreal, Que 

Ford Aerospace and Communications Corporation, 

Pal Alto, Cal 

Intra Acoustics Company Limited, Montreal, Que 

Litton Systems Canada Limited, Rexdale, Ont 

Marconi Avionics Limited, Rochester Kent, England .. 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1969—1785, September 17, 1969, authorized 
the remission for spare parts and equipment for 
ground service to aircraft of foreign airlines operat- 
ing into Canada on international routes: 

Cansica Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Cansica Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 

Comair Incorporated, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Delta Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Eastern Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Federal Express, Winnipeg, Man 

Pilgrim Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1970—958, June 2, 1970, remission of cus- 
toms duties on fabrics used in the manufacture of 
men's and boy's shirts: 

Lipton T and Sons Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Pegasus of Canada, Toronto, Ont 



81,626 



PC 1970—1536, September 9, 1970, remission of 
customs duty on certain motor vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof: 

American Motors Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 
American Motors (Canada) Limited, Brampton, Ont .. 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



4,093,500 

2,990,726 
7,084,226 



25,006 



2,302 



1,590 

6,689 

50,171 

29,478 

31,432 

394 

119,754 



5,902 

7,574 
3,059 
2,764 

11,045 
1,426 
1,615 
3,074 

36,459 



8,527 

9,614 

18.141 



26,128,162 

4,026,790 

215 

30.155.167 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 



13 '27 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1970—1786, October 14, 1970, remission of 
duties and sales tax otherwise payable on ballet 
slippers and pointed toe shoes when purchased by 
ballet schools for the use of their students and by 
ballet companies for the use of their performances: 

Alberta Ballet Company The, Edmonton, Alta 1,045 

Grands Ballets Canadiens, Montreal, Que 15,069 

National Ballet of Canada (Guild) The, Toronto, Ont 1 9,500 

National Ballet School (NSB) The, Toronto, Ont 4,952 

Royal Winnipeg Ballet of Canada, Winnipeg, Man 8,275 

48.841 

PC 1972—215, February 10, 1972, remission of 
customs duty on off-highway vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts: 

Bata Engineering, Batawa, Ont 87,719 

Brute Manufacturing Limited, Cambridge, Ont 14,200 

Canadian General Electric Company, Toronto, Ont .... 1,318 

Ceco Sales Limited, Burnaby, BC 6,931 

Euclid Canada Limited, Candiac, Que 13,033 

Euclid Canada, Guelph, Ont 5,039,954 

Euclid Canada Limited, St Thomas, Ont 23,616 

General Motors of Canada, London, Ont 398,676 

Ingersoll Rand Canada Incorporated, Rexdale, Ont .... 2,708 

L and M Radiator Limited, Winnipeg, Man 4,029 

Lincoln St Louis Canada Limited, Malton, Ont 1,259 

Lyman Tubeco Division Ferrum Incorporated, Oak- 

ville, Ont 1,294 

MacDonald Steel (1976), Cambridge, Ont 1,697 

Novacro Machine Limited, Stoney Creek, Ont 2,523 

Pacific Truck and Trailer Limited, North Vancouver, 

BC 426,863 

Pneumatic Industrial Equipment, Toronto, Ont 1,042 

Reliance Electric Limited, Mississauga, Ont 1,140 

Stratoflex of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,143 

Unit Rig and Equipment Company, Niagara Falls, 

Ont 2,500 

Unit Rig and Equipment Company, Stevensville, Ont .. 1,349,476 

Wabco Equipment of Canada, Paris, Ont 4,513,261 

Wilson Equipment Company Limited, Vancouver, BC 23,165 

Woodstock Hydraulic Power, Woodstock, Ont 2,437 

Remissions of less than $1,000 4,974 

11.924.958 

PC 1972—585, March 28, 1972, remission of 
customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof: 

Universal Handling Equipment, Hamilton, Ont 38,777 

PC 1972—845, May 2, 1972, remission of cus- 
toms duty on imported equipment and material used 
in the construction of exported vessels: 

Chantiers Maritimes Davie Limited, Lauzon, Que 

Field Aviation Company Limited, Calgary, Alta 

Saint John Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Lim- 
ited, St John, NB 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1972—2516, November 9, 1972. remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes in respect of Com- 
puter Generated Mailing Lists: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



2,693 



142,122 
3,159 

23,049 
781 
169,111 



PC 1973 — 51, January 9, 1973, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof of Westank Indus- 
tries Limited: 



Equipment RNG Limitee, Montreal, Que. 
Riemissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1972—1029, May 16, 1972, remission of cus- 
■ toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof: 

Teal Manufacturing Limited, Windsor, Ont 



3,140 



PC 1973—837, April 3, 1973, order respecting 
the privileges and immunities in Canada of the 
International Atomic Energy Agency: 

International Atomic Energy Limited, Toronto, Ont ... 

PC 1973—1361, May 29, 1973, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes in respect to goods 
imported for meetings in Canada or foreign 
organizations: 

Aid Association for Lutherans, Appleton, USA 

American United Life Insurance Company, 

Indianapolis, IN, USA 

Aparacor, Montreal, Que 

Digital Equipment, Montreal, Que 

Editor Publisher, Montreal, Que 

Florist Transworld Limited, Montreal, Que 

Guide International, Montreal, Que 

International Association of Business Communication, 

California, USA 

JCI World Congress, Montreal, Que 

Indianapolis Life Insurance Company, Indianapolis, 

IN, USA 

Life Insurance Texas, Houston, USA 

Investor Guaranty Life Insurance Company, Mercer 

Island, Washington, USA 

National Medical Association, Montreal, Que 

National Western Life Insurance Company, Austin, 

Texas 

Olga Danschen, Montreal, Que 

Pfizer Incorporated, Kirkland, Que 

Pfizer Incorporated, New York, USA 

Princess House North Dighton, Montreal, Que 

Shaklee Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Show Management, Montreal, Que 

Sunad, Montreal, Que 

Tandem Computer Canada Limited, Montreal, Que .... 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1973—3568, November 13, 1973, remission 
of customs duties paid or payable under the customs 
tariff on carbon fibres and filaments imported into 
Canada: 

Fibres Armtex Limitee (Les), Drummondville, Que .... 

Garlock of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

HSA Systems Incorporated, Rexdale, Ont 

Industries du Hockey Canadien Incorporee, Drum- 
mondville, Que 

Kennamental Incorporated, Port Coquitlam, BC 



1,377 

355 

1.732 



27,725 



5,298 

1,717 
1,000 
6,289 
1,294 
1.690 
1,620 

3,212 
6,859 

2,167 
5,642 

3,716 
1,638 

7,412 

2,083 

1,111 

3,181 

23,958 

14,135 

2,938 

6,170 

2,477 

33,447 

139,054 



7,087 

120,448 

2,659 

3,553 
1.558 



13*28 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



■Continued 



Robco Incorporated, Montreal, Que 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1973—3581, November 13, 1973, remission 
of customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, 
parts and accessories and parts thereof: 

Champion Truck Bodies Limited, Montreal, Que 

PC 1974 — 34, January 8, 1974, remission of a 
portion of the customs duties, sales tax and excise 
taxes paid or payable on goods grown, produced or 
manufactured in Australia: 

Craftsmen Distribution Incorporated, Burnaby, BC .... 

Donan Marketing, Vancouver, BC 

General Paint, Vancouver, BC 

Laporte United States Incorporated, New Jersey, 

USA 

Roussel Canada Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

SCM Corporation International Limited, New York, 

USA 

Thomas Skinner and Sons Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Vancouver Suzuki, Vancouver, BC 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1975—1024, May 6, 1975, remission of a 
portion of the customs duties and sales tax payable 
on automobiles produced in a foreign country by a 
manufacturer who has imported for installation on 
the automobiles, Canadian manufactured automo- 
biles components: 

Hussan Auto Canada, New Westminster, BC 

Subaru Canada Limited, Richmond, BC 

Toyota Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

PC 1976—263, February 10, 1976, remission of 
all customs duty paid or payable under the Customs 
Tarriff on defluorination: 

Great Lakes Forest Products Limited, Dryden, Ont 



PC 1976—325, February 17, 1976, remission of 
customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof: 

Pettibone (Canada) Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1976—957, April 27, 1976, remission of sales 
and excise taxes on imported aircraft used for 
demonstration to prospective customers: 

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Oklahoma City, 
USA 

Hughes Helicopters Limited, Culver City, USA 

Innotech Aviation Limited, Richmond, BC 

Northwest Ranching and Outfitting Limited, Smith- 
ers, BC 

Soloy Conversions Limited, Richmond, BC 



$ 

2,178 

1,931 

139.414 



1,136 



11,410 

1,858 

23,029 

16,719 
239,314 

30,298 

5,649 

2,239 

5,031 

335,547 



5,525 
30,858 

5,112 
41.495 



118,182 



103,703 

77 

103.780 



369,400 

68,490 

360,000 

4,590 

26,500 

828,980 



PC 1976 — 1314, June 1, 1976, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes payable on Canadian 
exposed and processed film and recorded video tape: 

Bellevue Pathe, Montreal, Que 

Boardwalk Motion Pictures Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Toronto, Ont 

Cine Video, Montreal, Que 

Dalton Fenske and Friends, Toronto, Ont 

Flynn Television, Montreal, Que 

Gilles Ste-Marie Associes, Montreal, Que 

ICC Cine Rail, Montreal, Que 

McWaters Films Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Ontario Educational Communications, Toronto, Ont.... 

Partners Film Company (The) Toronto, Ont 

Schultz Bob Production Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Societe Radio Canada, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1976—1884, July 20, 1976, authorized in 
respect of circuses and other amusement devices, 
remission of customs duty and excise taxes payable 
in excess of certain minimum amounts assessed for 
the period of time the goods remain in Canada: 

Alexander Sam, Vancouver, BC 

Antique Photos, Trail, BC 

Beauce Carnaval Incorporated, St-Georges de Beauce, 
Que 

Bechlers Roasted Chicken, London, Ont 

Big Sky Concessions, Billings, Montana 

Bill Dillard Shows, Edinburg, Texas 

Boutique Canard, Montreal, Que 

Centennial Gold, Vancouver, BC 

Chaffin Bol, Seattle, WA 

Coffman Concessions c/o Gloucester Tours, Glouces- 
ter, Ont 

Conklin and Garrett Limited, Brantford, Ont 

Dilliard Expositions Incorporated, Edinburg, Texas 

Don Paul Incorporated, Gathlingburgh, Tennessee 

Gatti Productions Incorporated, Edinburg, Texas 

Harlequin Amusement, Montreal, Que 

Jules Quinion, St-Benoit de Beauce, Que 

Les Concessions Exotiques, Montreal, Que 

Leu Thomson, Sebring, Ohio 

Libbertt Concessions, London, Ont 

Morton Kapp Granff Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

National Hawaii Products, Pearl City, Hawaii 

Range Rider Bar B Q Corporation, Calgary, Alta 

Raymond Gates, Eufala, Okla 

Robert Cassatta, HollyHill, Florida 

Tootsie Wootsie, Arroyo Grande, USA 

Townsend Concessions, Fergus Falls, Minn 

Trotter Mark, Santa Monica, CA 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1976—2984, December 2, 1976, remission of 
customs duty and excise taxes paid or payable on 
samples of negligable value: 



1,260 
1,788 
8,237 
1,109 
3,889 
1,047 
1,434 
1,305 
1,005 
3,074 
3,618 
1,708 
6,583 
15,421 
51.478 



Remissions of less than $1,000 



20,013 
4,380 

25,577 
23,841 
9,602 
3,711 
3,988 
2,013 
2,358 

2,898 

82,879 

60,598 

2,278 

3,024 

2,591 

9,882 

1,753 

15,089 

10,526 

2,000 

2,330 

7,660 

2,684 

6,515 

4,042 

1,278 

11,988 

784,138 

1.109,636 



8,355 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*29 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



PC 1977—297, February 10, 1977, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on buses, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof: 

Fauver JN (Canada) Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Ontario Bus Industries Incorf>orated, Mississauga, Ont 

Parker — Hannifin, Grimsby, Ont 

Saynor Electronics Limited, Don Mills, Ont 

Tube — Mac Installations, Anacaster, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1977—2391, August 31, 1977, remission of 
customs duty on transistors and other semi-conduc- 
tor devices: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1977—8/3148, November 3, 1977, remission 
of customs duty paid or payable on goods used in 
the development and manufacture of space shuttle 
manipulator systems joint Canada — USA/NASA 
Space Program: 

Spar Aerospace Products Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1978—185, January 26, 1978, remission of 
customs duty on unmanufactured tobacco: 

Bastos du Canada Limitee, Montreal, Que 

PC 1978—749, March 16, 1978, remission of 
customs duty on used foundry patterns and related 
jigs and fixtures: 

Abex Industries of Canada Limited, Winnipeg, Man .. 

Associated Foundry, Surrey, BC 

Benn Fron Foundry Limited, Wallaceburg, Ont 

Biria Industries Incorporated, Windsor, Ont 

Burnstein Castings Limited, St Catharines, Ont 

Canada Alloy Castings Limited, Kitchener, Ont 

Canadian Steel Foundries, Montreal Nord, Que 

Cercast Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Cercor Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Chemetics International Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Chroma Copy Canada Incorporated, Orillia, Ont 

Crane Foundry Limited, Cambridge, Ont 

Dart Foundries, Stevensville, Ont 

Dobney Foundry, Penticton, BC 

Dorr — Oliver Canada Limited, Orillia, Ont 

Emhart Canada Limited, Belleville, Ont 

Esco Limited, Port Coquitlam, BC 

Findlay Foundry, Carleton Place, Ont 

Fonderie de Thetford, Thetford Mines, Que 

Forano Incorporated, Plessisville, Que 

Joly Engineering, Montreal, Que 

Mainland Elworthy, Vancouver, BC 

Monarch Industries Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Robert Mitchell Incorporated, St-Laurent, Que 

Rockwell International, Guelph, Ont 

Shellcast Foundries, Longueuil, Que 

^ Specialty Cast Metals Limited, Niagara Falls, Ont 

Titan Foundry Limited, Edmonton, Alta 

Unitcast Canada Limited, Montreal, Que 



27,105 

728,740 

16,385 

2,261 

2,208 

1,878 

778.577 



1,010 



37,875 

13 

37,888 



38,506 



40,835 
5,368 
7.059 
2,774 
2,582 
16,158 
68,304 
39,611 
6,645 
22,172 
4,866 
7,821 
3,779 
9,255 
3,021 
4,762 
70,417 
2,080 
3,383 
6,818 
1,002 
2,210 
2,009 
5,787 
9,717 
1,185 
8,219 
2,151 
2,373 



Welmet Industries Limited, Welland, Ont 
Western Foundry Limited, Wingham, Ont 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1978—842, March 23, 1978, remission of 
customs duties and sales tax on certain pleasure 
cruisers: 

AFC Grew Incorporated, Penetanguishene, Ont 

Canoe Cove Manufacturing Limited, Victoria, BC 

Marineland Yacht Sales Limited, Richmond, BC 



PC 1978—1116, April 13, 1978, remission of 
customs duty on titanium anodes: 

BC Chemicals, Prince George, BC 

BCM Technologies Limited, Amherstburg, Ont 

BCM Technologies Limited, Toronto, Ont 

CIL Industrial Chemical Works, Becancour, Que 

CIL Incorporee, Montreal, Que 

Chemetics International Limited, Montreal, Que 

Chemetics International Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Dow Chemical Canada Incorporated, Fort Saskatche- 
wan, Alta 

Dow Chemical Canada Incorporated, Sarnia, Ont 

Electrode Corporation, Chardon, Ohio 

Electrode Corporation, Vancouver, BC 

Erco Industries Limited, Toronto, Ont 

FMC of Canada Limited, Squamish, BC 

Great Lakes Forest Products Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Industries PPG Canada Limitee, Montreal, Que 

Quenor Incorporated, Magog, Que 

Quenord Chemicals Limited, Magog, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1978—1136, April 13, 1978, remission of 
customs duty in respect of vessels chartered by CN 
Marine Corporation for the Atlantic Region Ferry 
Service: 

Canadian National Railways, Moncton, NB 

Eurocan Agencies Limited, Truro, NS 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1978—2644, August 23, 1978, order respect- 
ing the remission of customs duty on soluble coffee 
produced in countries entitled to the benefits of the 
General Preferential Tariffs: 

Galbay and Company, Montreal, Que 

General Foods Incorporated, Ville La Salle, Que 

Sandra Tea and Coffee, Mississauga, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



S 

10,165 

21,474 

5,587 

399.589 



557,529 

195,049 

544,898 

1,297.476 



7,009 
204,586 
24,815 
1,307 
44,521 
28,588 
19,803 

229,312 

158,765 

83,486 

100,529 

27,355 

73.698 

46,123 

23,289 

20,719 

7,077 

846 

1.101.828 



26,972 

1.303 

250 

28.525 



1,503 
1,790 

10,734 
918 

14.945 



PC 1978—2658, August 23, 1978, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automobiles of Volk- 
swagen Canada Limited: 

Volkswagen Canada Incorporated, Scarborough, Ont .. 1 ,3 1 7,01 1 



13'30 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



PC 1978—2837, September 6, 1978, remission of 
customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof: 

Western Star Trucks Incorporated 



PC 1978—3117, October 12, 1978, remission of 
customs duty and excise taxes on obsolete or surplus 
goods destroyed in Canada: 



Remissions. 



PC 1978—7/3222, October 19, 1978, the remis- 
sion of customs duty and sales tax on goods import- 
ed in connection with the acquisition of Armoured 
Vehicles General Purpose and defence supplies 
associated therewith: 

Department of National Defence, Trenton, Ont 

General Motors of Canada Limited (Diesel Division), 

London, Ont 

Michelin Tires Canada Limited, St-Laurent, Que 

Mil Quip Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Triplex Engineering, Pointe-Claire, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1978—3762, December 14, 1978, partial 
remission of customs duties, sales and excise taxes 
paid on parts, equipment and other items for use by 
Canadian Air Carriers providing international com- 
mercial air service: 

Air Canada, Montreal, Que 

Air Canada, Winnipeg, Man 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Toronto, Ont 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Vancouver, BC 

Nordair Aircraft Combined Services, Montreal, Que .. 

Wardair Canada Incorporated, Mississauga, Ont 

Worldways Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

PC 1978—3839, December 21, 1978, partial 
remission of customs duties, sales tax on specified 
commercial vehicles, parts and accessories and parts 
thereof: 

Central Truck Body Company Limited, Weston, Ont .. 

PC 1979—395, February 15, 1979, remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes in respect of non- 
commercial importations in connection with warran- 
ty or guaranty adjustments: 

Remission of less than $1,000 

PC 1979—3494, December 19, 1979, remission of 
customs duties on television chassis and components: 

Electrohome Limited, Kitchener, Ont 

Hitachi Credit Canada Incorporated, Vancouver, BC .. 
Matsushita Industrial Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont .. 

Proconics Electronics Limited, Vancouver, BC 

RCA, Incorporated Limited, Prescott, Ont 

RCA, Pointe-Claire, Que 



7,362 



3,525,468 



9,659 

134,976 

44,887 

5,394 

12,375 

1,481 

208,772 



162,546 

57,744 

7,184 

9,239 

294,765 

10,814 

5,007 
774.965 



12,643 



3,817 



24,822 

3,758 

16,970 

3,601 

1,635,394 

16,476 

1.701.021 



PC 1980 — 489, February 8, 1980, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automobiles of BMW 
Distributors Eastern Canada Limited and BMW 
Distributors (Western) Company: 

BMW Distribution Eastern Canada Limited, Whitby, 
Ont 

PC 1980 — 493, February 8, 1980, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automobiles of Mer- 
cedes Benz of Canada Limited: 

Mercedes Benz Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 



PC 1980—494, February 8, 1980, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automobiles of Nissan 
Automobile Company (Canada) Limited: 

Nissan Auto Company Limited, New Westminster, 
BC 

PC 1980—7/1674, June 19, 1980, provides for the 
remission of customs duty and sales tax paid or 
payable on "printed material" imported into 
Canada by or on behalf of a "foreign carrier" for 
use exclusively in the promotion and operation of air 
services provided by the said carrier: 

Air France, Montreal, Que 

Air India, Mirabel, Que 

Alitalia Airlines, Toronto, Ont 

Cansica Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 

Cansica, Montreal, Que 

Delta Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Eastern Air Lines Montreal, Que 

Emery Air Freight Corporation, Winnipeg, Man 

Federal Express, Montreal, Que 

Finnair (Finland), Montreal, Que 

Frontier Airlines Incorporated, Denver, Colo 

Frontier Airlines Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man 

KLM Royal Dutch Air Lines, Dorval, Que 

Lufthansa German Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Northwest Airlines, Winnipeg, Man 

Republic Airlines, Montreal, Que 

Sabena Airlines, Mirabel, Que 

Swiss Air Transport, Mirabel, Que 

Tap, Mirabel, Que 

US Air Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1980—1677, June 19, 1980, remissions of 
customs duty on goods used in the manufacture of 
electronic subsystems for communication satellites 
for export: 

Spar Aerospace Limited, Toronto, Ont 



PC 1980—2066, July 31, 1980, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on automobiles of Canadian 
Honda Motor Limited: 

Honda Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 



300,686 



61,015 



12,439 



15,522 

2,860 

1,935 

3,952 

10,446 

15,947 

13,286 

1,878 

2,229 

3,718 

1,383 

2,233 

6,343 

1,561 

3,858 

2,270 

3,028 

2,499 

1,225 

2,339 

301,515 

400.027 



1,215 



35,000 



PC 1980—2751, October 16, 1980, provides for 
remission of customs duty and partial sales tax paid 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*31 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



or payable in respect of front end wheel loaders and 
parts: 

Caterpillar Canada, Montreal, Que 1,162,203 

Caterpillar of Canada Limited, Concord, Ont 133,871 

Caterpillar of Canada Limited, Missaussauga, Ont 8,1 17,127 

Caterpillar of Canada Limited, Vancouver, BC 767,870 

Clark Equipment of Canada Limited, Pointe-Claire, 

Que 13,115 

Clark Equipment of Canada Limited, St Thomas, Ont 1,877,905 

Clark Equipment of Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont .... 12,331 

Euclid Canada Limited, St Thomas, Ont 88,204 

General Motors of Canada Limited, London, Ont 85,300 

International Harvester Canada Limited, Candiac, 

Que 88,807 

International Hough Division of Dresser Canada, 

Candiac, Que 1,111,237 

International Hough Dresser Canada Limited, Hamil- 
ton, Ont 204,908 

Remissions of less than $1,000 3 

13.662.881 

PC 1980—3160, November 27, 1980, remission 
of a portion of the customs duties, sales tax and 
excise taxes paid or payable on goods grown, pro- 
duced or manufactured in New Zealand: 

Canada Feloriculture Limited, Surrey, BC 9,870 

Canadian Exchange A Blade, Vancouver, BC 5,774 

Canterbury of New Zealand (Canada) Limited, Rich- 
mond, BC 2,487 

Canterbury Sheepskin, Richmond, BC 1,378 

Colin Campbell and Sons Limited, Vancouver, BC 1 1,951 

Davenport Ronald F, Vancouver, BC 1 1,163 

David L Jones Wholesale Limited, Burnaby, BC 10,208 

Feltex New Zealand USA Incorporated, Los Angeles, 

USA 1,147 

J — Mar Engineering Limited, Vancouver, BC 2,948 

Knight International, Vancouver, BC 2,106 

Lyons Fry Mergiers, Toronto, Ont 1,033 

Marquis of London Manufacturing (1979), Vancou- 
ver, BC 7,651 

New Zealand Export Limited, Seattle, USA 2,698 

Nitwannes Investments, Vancouver, BC 1,106 

Ocean West Manufacturing, Vancouver, BC 10,791 

Outlook Fashions Limited, Vancouver, BC 6,969 

Shepherd's House of Import Limited, Vancouver, BC .. 1,076 

VSR Products, Vancouver, BC 9,091 

Western Project Management, Vancouver, BC 1,824 

Remissions of less than $1,000 6,281 

107.552 

PC 1981—578, March 5, 1981, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof of Remtec Inc: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 3,898 



PC 1981—649, March 6, 1981, remission of sales 
tax on Canadian civil aircraft, Canadian aircraft 
engines, Canadian flight simulators and parts there- 
of, repaired abroad: 

Dagelman Industries Limited 

Quebec Cartier Mining Company, Port Cartier, Que .. 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1981 — 1/923, April 2, 1981, remission of 
customs duties paid or payable on material or com- 
ponents imported by CAE Electronics Limited: 

CAE Electronics, Montreal, Que 



PC 1981—1651, June 18, 1981, remission of cus- 
toms duties, sales and excise taxes paid or payable 
by Westinghouse Canada Limited: 

Westinghouse Canada Incorporated, Hamilton, Ont .... 

PC 1981—2318, August 19, 1981, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automobiles of Japan, 
Rover, Triumph Canada Incorporated: 

Jaguar Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 



PC 1981—4/2723, October 8, 1981, remission of 
customs duties and taxes paid on machinery and 
equipment imported by various companies: 

Tri-Way Machine Limited, Windsor, Ont 



PC 1982—2/163, January 14, 1982, remission of 
customs duties and taxes paid on machinery and 
equipment imported by various companies: 

Newcor Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 



PC 1982—190, January 21, 1982, remission of 
customs duty on unfmished leather for use in the 
manufacture of flnished garment leathers: 

Ashford Imports, Weston, Ont 

Cantan Leather Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Cerro Leather Canada, Montreal, Que 

Chateau Stores of Canada, Montreal, Que 

CL Imports, Montreal, Que 

Collis Leather Limited, Aurora, Ont 

Copexim Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Entreprises P Boucher, Montreal, Que 

Leatherhawk Limited, Vankleek Hill, Ont 

Paramount Fabrics Limited, Montreal, Que 

Richard Greene, Montreal, Que 

Rodon Leather Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



23,497 

113,789 

1,683 

138.969 



1.136 



101,010 



127,901 



11,739 



1,487 



8,902 

344,342 

7,784 

10,997 

7,761 

328,716 

3,926 

72,855 

4,742 

3,480 

3,347 

86,043 

845 

883.740 



PC 1981—579, March 5, 1981, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof of Transit Van 
Bodies Incorjxjrated: 

Les Fourgons Transit, Montreal, Que 



PC 1982—386, February 11, 1982, remission of 
customs duties on certain vacuum evaporator masks 
from stainless steel and employed in the production 
of photocells: 

18,688 Silonex Incorporated, St-Laurent, Que 



1.086 



13-32 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1982—887, March 18, 1982, remission of 
customs duty on chemicals and photomasks used in 
the production of semiconductor devices imported 
by Mitel Corporation: 

Mitel Semi-Conducteur Incorporated, Ottawa, Ont 

Mitel Semi-Conducteur Incorporated, Quebec, Que .... 

PC 1982—890, March 18, 1982, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Bombardier Incorporated, Logistic Equipment Divi- 
sion: 

Bombardier Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Bombardier Incorporated, Valcourt, Que 

Canrep Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Farr Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Kralinator Filters Division, Cambridge, Ont 

Levitt — Safety (Eastern) Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Robert Bosch Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1982—993, April 1, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on goods imported in con- 
nection with the CF-18 Hornet Aircraft: 

Allan Crawford Association Limited, Mississauga, 

Ont 

Aviation Electric, St-Laurent, Que 

CAE Electronics, Montreal, Que 

Canadian General Electric Company Limited, 

Toronto, Ont 

Canadian Marconi, Montreal, Que 

Department of National Defence, Downsview, Ont 

Department of National Defence, Ottawa, Ont 

Department of National Defence, Toronto, Ont 

Department of National Defence, Westwin, Man 

Digital Equipment of Canada Limited, Kanata, Ont .... 
ES Stephenson and Company Limited, Saint John, 

NB 

Eastern Scale Manufacturing Incorporated, Toronto, 

Ont 

Electronic Wholesalers Company, Montreal, Que 

Electronic Wholesalers Limited, Ottawa, Ont 

Entreprise AWSM Limitee, St-Pierre, Que 

Godfrey Howden Incorporated, Lachine, Que 

Hawker Siddeley Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Internet Limited, Carleton Place, Ont 

Intra Accoustics Company Limited, Boucherville, Que 

Intra Accoustics, Montreal, Que 

John Degroot Associates, Toronto, Ont 

Leigh Instruments Limited, Carleton Place, Ont 

Les Ateliers Hochelaga, Montreal, Que 

Marconi Avionic Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Patlon Aircraft and Industries, Toronto, Ont 

Radionics Scientific Incorporated, Downsview, Ont 

Rockwell International of Canada Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

Spar Aerospace Limited, Kanata, Ont 

Sperry Gyroscope Division, Rockland, Ont 

Sterling Aircraft Products Limited, Concord, Ont 

Subtec Limited, Ottawa, Ont 



Williams and Wilson Limited, Montreal, Que 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



6,881 
34,073 
40.954 



2,450 

835,681 

12,808 

1,516 

6,160 

4,322 

52,796 

1,892 

917,625 



15,272 

74,138 

9,810 

103,779 

7,026 

1,002,216 

1,700,686 

429,549 

34,877 

14,892 

6,517 

1,055 

5,591 

2,631 

2,067 

45,436 

34,810 

6,158 

15,277 

6,657 

2,417 

6,170 

1,364 

11,874 

32,314 

3,281 

13,604 

1 56,698 

40,834 

5,084 

1,274 



PC 1982—1164, April 22, 1982, remission of 
customs duties on certain goods from the People's 
Republic of China: 

Accesso — Craft, Montreal, Que 

Acme Ruler Company Limited, Mount- Forest, Ont .... 

Anelo Oriental Rugs Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Anshell Industries, Montreal, Que 

Basic International Network Limited, Downsview, Ont 

Bilwan Trading Company Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Bob Dale Glove and Import Limited, Edmonton, Alta.. 

Bob Dale Glove and Import Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Buffalo East Cantra Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

CAE Horse Limited, Vancouver, BC 

CK King Porcelain Company Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Cabrelli, Montreal, Que 

Candian Willametter Industries, Vancouver, BC 

Cathay Importers, Vancouver, BC 

Chung Wah Discount Centre Limited, Vancouver, BC 

DP Handbags, Montreal, Que 

Djawa Pacific Enterprises Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Djawa Pacific Enterprises Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Dogree Fashion Limited, Montreal, Que 

Douglas PK Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Dundas Sheet Metal Work Company, Toronto, Ont .... 

East West Gift Centre, Vancouver, BC 

Emego Trading Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Exclusive Leather Products, Montreal, Que 

Fairway Products, Vancouver, BC 

Ganz Brothers Toys Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Geanel Restaurant Supply Limited, Saskatoon, Sask .. 

Gemma Sacs Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Gifts and Such, Toronto, Ont 

Gim Lee Yuen (1956) Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Glove World Manufacturing Company Limited, 
Toronto, Ont 

Grand DeToy Limited, Montreal, Que 

Great Wall Machinery Trading Company, Toronto, 
Ont 

H Hacking Company Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Habro Industries, Longueuil, Que 

Homtronix Industries Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Hong Kong Traders, Vancouver, BC 

Huck Glove Company Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont... 

IGRA Distributors Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Jomac Canada Incorporated (Domestic Glove Divi- 
sion), Beebe, Que 

K Mart Canada Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Klein Richard Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Knit.Set Limited, Montreal, Que 

Kung's Manufacturing Limited, Vancouver, BC 

La Cie Artel, Montreal, Que 

La Cie Artel, Toronto, Ont 

La Cie Artel, Vancouver, BC 

Lam Bernardo, Vancouver, BC 

Latoplast Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Lee and Man Manufacturing Limited, Toronto, Ont.... 

Lee and Man Manufacturing Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Les Importations Sacsibo, Montreal, Que 

Les Produits Electriques, Montreal, Que 



9,471 

3,981 

3.806.810 



7,700 

8,706 

24,832 

4,501 

19,774 

1,284 

18,607 

2,856 

6,176 

4,128 

15,786 

11,583 

3,333 

3,541 

1,479 

1,790 

34,385 

28,814 

2,975 

16,424 

2,092 

4,159 

8,648 

17,326 

4,408 

15,218 

12,477 

10,676 

6,049 

3,098 

1,092 
45,433 

17,603 
1,472 

11,355 
1,819 
2,104 
1,914 
3,201 

4,374 

6,772 

1,214 

4,455 

3,506 

36,736 

20,793 

1,166 

1,245 

11,700 

4,701 

7,395 

5,405 

1,992 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13'33 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



Les Sacs a Main Mino Incorporee, Montreal, Que 

Lou Sterns Sales, Montreal, Que 

Memphis Glove Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Metropolitain Jobbing, Montreal, Que 

Mister Glove, Edmonton, Alta 

Prescott and Company (Canada) Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

Rainee Manufacturing Products, Toronto, Ont 

Randim Marketing Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Rattana Trading Company, Vancouver, BC 

Regal Imports Chomedey, Laval, Que 

Remo Imports, Montreal, Que 

S and D Sales O/B Sylward, Toronto, Ont 

Sanyo Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Schwartz Al Enterprises Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Skins Novelty Importing Company Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

Stein Novelty, Montreal, Que 

Stella Handbags, Montreal, Que 

Telio and Cie, Montreal, Que 

Ugosac Import Limited, Montreal, Que 

VMV Enterprise, Montreal, Que 

Van Roy Industries Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Varimpo Variety Import, Montreal, Que 

Velo Sport, Montreal, Que 

Veneto Imports Limited, Montreal, Que 

Watson John, Vancouver, BC 

Wickerware (Canada) Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Wings Neckwear Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Yuen Fong Company Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1982—1717, June 10, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duties on certain implants for use in fattening 
cattle: 

Animal Health Supplies, Regina, Sask 

Boehringer Ingelheim, Burlington, Ont 

Canada Packers Incorporated, Calgary, Alta 

Canada Packers Incorporated, St-Hyacinthe, Que 

Canada Packers Incorporated, St Marys, Ont 

Canada Packers Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Dominion Vet Labs Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Farmix Limited, Mitchell, Ont 

Kane Veterinary Supplies Limited, Edmonton, Alta .... 

Steere Enterprises Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Syntex Agri Business Limited, Toronto, Ont 

United Co-op of Ontario, Guelph, Ont 

United Co-op of Ontario, Mississauga, Ont 

United Farmers of Alberta Co-operative, Calgary, 

Alta 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1982—1872, June 23, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duties on certain books and printed matter: 



Remissions of less than $1,000 



5,120 
2,298 
5,603 
16.281 
1,193 

3,039 

12.653 

29,988 

55,253 

1,863 

18,509 

8,440 

1,643 

1,007 

1,016 

6,657 

32,105 

1,951 

15,742 

12,686 

2,168 

2,992 

4,594 

27,862 

7,779 

5,533 

14,042 

26,833 

32,661 

857,783 



16,823 

6,560 

30,036 

1,534 

15,770 

10,991 

5,318 

2,637 

23,189 

23,170 

35,488 

18,910 

5,660 

14,561 

988 

211.635 



12,912,396 



PC 1982—1893, June 23, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duties, sales and excise taxes on goods import- 
ed into Canada by scientific expeditions in substitu- 
tion therefore: 



PC 1982—1994, June 30, 1982, remission of sales 
tax on Canadian civil aircraft, Canadian aircraft 
engine, Canadian flight simulators and parts there- 
of, repaired abroad, in substitution therefore: 

Air Canada, Toronto, Ont 

Canadian Conference, Vancouver, BC 

Delson Lease Hold Limited, Waterloo, Ont 

Dian Forest Products Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Echo Bay Mines Limited, Edmonton, Alta 

Godfrey Howden Incorporated, Lachine, Que 

Guelph Air, Guelph, Ont 

Hayes — Dana Incorporated, St Catharines, Ont 

Kiewit Peter and Sons Company Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

Lignum Air, Vancouver, BC 

Noranda Mines Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Nova An Alberta Corporation, Calgary, Alta 

Orilla Aviation, Orillia, Ont 

Pacific Western Airlines, Richmond, BC 

Pan Canadian Petroleum, Calgary, Alta 

Quebec North Shore and Labrador, Montreal, Que 

Sperry Incorporated, Rockland, Ont 

Sugra Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Toyota Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Trans Canada Pipe Lines Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Vancouver Hockey Club Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1982—2182, July 22, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Funcraft Vehicles (1981) Limited: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1982—2262, July 29, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on communications equip- 
ment for the Region Operations Control Centres 
military surveillance system: 

Bell Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Bell Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1982—2266, July 29, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on automobiles of Subaru 
Auto Canada Limited: 

Subaru Auto Canada Limited, Richmond, BC 

PC 1982—2477, August 18, 1982, remission of 
customs duty on equipment for use by Mitel Corpo- 
ration in the design, development, testing or manu- 
facture of semiconductor devices: 

Mitel Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Mitel Corporation, Ottawa, Ont 

Mitel Corporation, Quebec, Que 



PC 1982—2623, September 3, 1982, the remis- 
sion of customs duty and sales tax on sewing 
machines imported by Singer Company of Canada 
Limited: 



2,622 

46,200 

4,222 

202,536 
4.518 
2,868 
1,309 

451,035 

111,227 

70,470 

509,893 

1,386 

2,007 

36,338 

612.600 

9,855 

6,491 

4,259 

203,318 

18,808 

257,774 

3,820 

2.563.556 



1,009 



8,677 

27,866 

200 

36.743 



5,635 



39,231 

47,004 

100,813 

187.048 



McGill University, Schefferville, Que 



7,489 Singer Company, St- Jean, Que. 



600,747 



13-34 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1982—2635, September 3, 1982, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Western Star Trucks Incorporated: 

Western Star Trucks Incorporated, Mississauga, Ont .. 

PC 1982—3142, October 14, 1982, remission of 
customs duties on North Pacific Alaskan Fur 
Sealskins: 

Amsel and Amsel, Montreal, Que 

Canadian Furs, Montreal, Que 

DH Grosvenor Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Fabulous Furs, Montreal, Que 

Giassman and Maislin Fur, Montreal, Que 

Harry Richer Furs, Montreal, Que 

L Hendelman Fur, Montreal, Que 

Michies Machine, Montreal, Que 

Montreal Master Furriers, Montreal, Que 

New York Fur Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Samuel Grossman Fur, Montreal, Que 

Victor Goodman Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1982—3143, October 14, 1982, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on cables and related 
goods for use in transmitting power between the 
British Columbia mainland and Vancouver Island: 

SocietaCavi Pirelli SPA, Milan, Italy 

Standard Telefon Og Kabelfabrik A/S, Oslo, Norway.. 

PC 1982—3144, October 14, 1982, remission of 
customs duty on rotogravure printing rolls imported 
by DOMCO Industries Limited, Farnham, Que: 

DOMCO Industries Limited, Montreal, Que 

PC 1982—3200, October 21, 1982, remission of 
customs duty paid or payable in respect of four 
electric generators imported by or on behalf of Pratt 
and Whitney Aircraft of Canada Limited, for use in 
gas turbine generating sets to be supplied to Ontario 
Hydro: 

Pratt and Whitney of Canada Incorporated, Lon- 
gueuil. Que 

PC 1982—3201, October 21, 1982, remission of 
customs duties on processed almonds and pistachios: 

Adams Brands Division Warner — Lambert Canada 
Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Adams Brands, Vancouver, BC 

Baskin Robbins Division Silverwood Industries, Peter- 
borough, Ont 

C Charles and Company (1973), Toronto, Ont 

Canadian Pacific Airlines, Vancouver, BC 

Compass Food Sales Company Limited, Willowdale, 
Ont 

F Archibald Brokerage Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Galloway's Specialty Foods, Vancouver, BC 

General Foods Incorporated, Cobourg, Ont 

Gibbs Nathaniel, Montreal, Que 

Johnsons NB Coffee and Food, Vancouver, BC 



85,927 



1,467 
1,714 
1,952 
7,422 
7,727 
6,546 
1,302 
1,325 
1,882 
9,209 
6,204 

19,279 
2,700 

68.729 



4,822,601 
2,830,613 
7.653.214 



4,717 



521,448 



29,233 
40,709 

2,635 
7,750 

5,422 

7,533 
29,041 
1,882 
5,643 
4,764 
2,164 



Laura Secord Limited, Scarborough, Ont 7,690 

Les Aliments Vis Foods Incorporee, Lachine, Que 6,074 

Lucerne Foods Limited, Vancouver, BC 1,126 

Lucerne Foods Limited, Winnipeg, Man 3,390 

RC Purdy Chocolates Limited, Vancouver. BC 4,157 

Sherman Trading Company Limited, Vancouver, BC .. 1,085 

Silverwood Dairies, Peterborough, Ont 1,203 

Trophy Foods Limited, Brampton, Ont 1 1,645 

Trophy Foods Limited, Toronto, Ont 3,203 

Trophy Foods Limited, Vancouver, BC 42,265 

Warner — Lambert Canada Incorporated, Scarbor- 
ough, Ont 24,107 

Remissions of less than $1,000 44,039 

286.760 

PC 1982—3315, October 28, 1982, remission of 
customs duty, sales and excise taxes paid on goods 
damaged, deteriorated or destroyed prior to release 
of the goods from customs control: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 1,198 

PC 1982—3470, November 18, 1982, remission 
of customs duty on goods used in the manufacture 
of satellites and satellite subsystems for export: 

Alexander D Smart Limited, Markham, Ont 1,548 

Canadian General Electric Company Limited, 

Toronto, Ont 1,143 

Com Dev Limited, Cambridge, Ont 195,374 

Com Dev Limited, Toronto, Ont 427,829 

Fleet Industries Division Ronyx Corpmration Limited, 

Fort Erie, Ont 5,689 

Spar Aerospace Limited, Kanata, Ont 1,666,445 

Spar Aerospace Products Limited, Ste-Anne-de-Belle- 

vue. Que 1,126 

Spar Aerospace Products, Toronto, Ont 2,078,378 

Spar Aerospace, St-Laurent, Que 574,817 

Westburne Industrial Enterprises Limited, Missis- 
sauga, Ont 20,918 

Remissions of less than $1,000 2,172 

4.975.439 

PC 1982—3822, December 9, 1982, remission of 
customs duty on certain goods used in the produc- 
tion of components for certain aircraft: 

AC Impact Industries, Dorval, Que 9,535 

Aircraft Appliances and Equipment Limited, Brama- 

lea, Ont 2,679 

Boeing of Canada Limited, Arnprior, Ont 45,901 

Boeing of Canada Limited, Winnipeg, Man 1,995,004 

Bristol Aerospace Limited, Winnipeg, Man 3,477 

CAE Electronics, Montreal, Que 6,324 

Canadair, St-Laurent, Que 54,616 

Davis Controls Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,188 

Dubois et Nadeau Incorporee, Drummondville, Que .... 3,900 

EG and G Instruments, Toronto, Ont 2,697 

Electronic Wholesales, Verdun, Que 17,230 

Enheat Limited, Amherst, NS 15,516 

Entreprises d'electricite J HT, Montreal, Que 22,62 1 

Fell — Fab International Incorporated, Hamilton, Ont.. 300,520 

Field Aviation Company Limited, Calgary, Alta 8,789 

Fleet Industries, Fort Erie, Ont 72,112 

IMP Group Limited, Halifax, NS 4,403 

IMP Group Limited, Hammonds Plains, NS 158,528 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



13*35 



Leigh Instruments Limited, Carleton Place, Ont 

Mantegna Incorporated, Oakville, Ont 

Mantegna Incorporated, St-Michel, Que 

McDonnell Douglas Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont .... 

Palton Aircraft and Industries, Toronto, Ont 

Rockwell International of Canada Limited Toronto, 

Ont 

Varian Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Wackid Radio, Ottawa, Ont 

Wright Canvas, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1982—3941, December 23, 1982, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Commercial Vans Incorporated: 

Commercial Van Lines Incorporated, Brampton, Ont .. 

PC 1982—3942, December 23, 1982, remission of 
all duty specified that is payable in respect of com- 
mercial vehicles and all parts and accessories and 
parts thereof for such vehicles, except tires, tubes 
and machines or other articles required by Tariff 
Items 43803 — 1 to be valued separately under the 
tariff items otherwise applicable thereto: 



Pollock Equipment, Strathroy, Ont 



PC 1982—3943, December 23, 1982, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Red Top Equipment Company Limited: 

Red Top Equipment Company Limited, Orillia, Ont... 
Red Top Equipment Company Limited, Winnipeg, 

Man 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1983—21, January 13, 1983, respecting the 
designation of least developed developing countries: 

Ateliers Aspasie Incorporee (Les), St-Barnabe, Que .... 

PC 1983—30, January 13, 1983, remission of 
customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof of George C Doerr 
Body and Trailer Company: 

George C Doerr Body and Trailer Company, Kitchen- 
er, Ont 

PC 1983—189, January 27, 1983, remission of 
customs duties on certain products: 

AMF Canada Limited, Guelph, Ont 

Frame Neckwear Company Limited, Waterloo, Ont .... 

Kayser Roth Canada Limited, London, Ont 

Monad Sports Limited, Banff, Alta 

RSL Sports Equipment Limited, Calgary, Atla 

Ski and Sport House Calgary Limited, Calgary, Atla .. 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



90,809 

2,286 

6,501 

203,103 

6,310 

34,701 
2,249 
1,241 

67,825 

4,041 

3, 1 44. 1 06 



2,635 



1,281 



17,040 

6,200 

432 

23,672 



19,517 



2,382 



150,942 

4,516 

38,711 

1,531 

14,617 

1,406 

1,161,553 

1,373,276 



PC 1983 — 448, February 17, 1983, remission of 
customs duties on linerboard and solid bleached 
boxboard: 

Cie International Papier, Lachine, Que 

CIP Incorporee, Montreal, Que 

CIP Incorporated, Rexdale, Ont 

Crown Forest Industries Limited, Vancouver, BC 

Domtar Packaging Limited, Mississauga, Ont 

Howell Packaging Division of Dover Industries, Burl- 
ington, Ont 

MacMillan Bathhurst Incorporated, Winnipeg, Man .. 

MacMillan Bloedel Packaging Division, Winnipeg, 
Man 

NFLD Container, St John's, Nfid 

Plastic and Paper Sales Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Societe d'Aluminium Reynolds, Montreal, Que 

Somerville Belkin Industries Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

Somerville Belkin Industries, London, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1983—590, February 24, 1983, remission of 
customs duty on lamp bulbs for Christmas lighting 
sets: 

Alderbrooke Industries, Toronto, Ont 

Les Produits Electriques Universal, Montreal, Que 

Noma Industries Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1983—6/652, March 3, 1983, remission of the 
customs duty, sales and excise taxes paid or payable 
during the period October 1, 1982 to September 30, 
1983, on articles and samples of merchandise tem- 
porarily imported for the purpose of being photo- 
graphed for use in brochures, catalogues and other 
advertising material for export: 

Pringle and Booth Limited, Toronto, Ont 



PC 1983—941, March 31, 1983, remission of 
customs duty on textured polyester filament yarns: 

Celanese Canada Incorporated, Drummondville, Que .. 

PC 1983—942, March 31, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on satellite signal scram- 
blers and descramblers for use in television and 
radio broadcasting: 

Canadian Satellite Communications Incorporated, 
Burlington, Ont 

PC 1983—946, March 31, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Triangle Truck Equipment Limited: 

Triangle Truck Equipment Limited, Waterloo, Ont 

PC 1983—947, March 31, 1983, remission of the 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Childs Truck Bodies Limited: 

Childs Truck Bodies Limited, Stoney Creek, Ont 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



1,142 
6,150 
1.029 
5,206 
5,272 

1,367 
13,848 

9,428 
9,353 
1,079 
1,196 
9,777 
2,799 
12,266 
79.912 



29,356 

115,673 

238,759 

985 

384,773 



2,488 



47,671 



19,135 



1,573 



3,005 

482 

3,487 



13*36 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1983—1250, April 28, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and sales and excise taxes on imported 
cofflns or caskets: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

,' PC 1983—1438, May 12, 1983, remission of cus- 

I toms duty and sales tax on automobiles, parts and 

I accessories and parts thereof of Aurora Cars 

I Limited: 

Aurora Cars Limited, Richmond Hill, Ont 

Jaguar Canada Incorporated, Bramalea, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1983—6/1473, May 19, 1983, remission of 
customs duties and taxes paid on machinery and 
equipment imported by various companies: 

F Jos Lamb Company Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1983—1499, May 19, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on automobiles of Volkswa- 
gen Canada Limited: 

Volkswagen Canada Incorporated, Barrie, Ont 



PC 1983—5/1519, May 26, 1983, remission of 
customs duties and taxes paid on machinery and 
equipment imported by various companies: 

Diesel Division General Motors of Canada, London, 
Ont 

PC 1983—4/1665, June 2, 1983, remission of 
customs duty paid or payable under Schedule A of 
the Customs Tariff on helicopter immersion suits, 
for use during the transport of workers between 
Canadian ports and oil drilling rigs located offshore: 

Safety Offshore Services, St John's, Nfld 

PC 1983—2037, June 30, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on goods imported for use in 
the ANZCAN Telecommunications System: 

Teleglobe Canada, Port Alberni, BC 

PC 1983—2067, July 7, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on automotive machinery 
and equipment imported into Canada by certain 
specifled companies: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1983—2333, July 27, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty, sales and excise taxes and excise duties 
on goods imported by visiting forces personnel: 

Mrs Bruce J Ray, Oromocto, NB 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1983—2340, July 27, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on the duty paid or payable 
by Bastos du Canada Limitee on importations of 
cigarette filters: 

Bastos Limit6e, Montreal, Que 



1,256 



126,205 

1,497 

206 

127,908 



27,074 

167 

27,241 



3,573,007 



2,588 



20,997 



19,887 



1,504 



1,916 
4,065 
5,981 



55,056 



PC 1983—2374, July 27, 1983, remission of the 
customs duty paid or payable on imported goods 
detained prior to being released to charitable organ- 
izations in Canada: 

Can Aide Foundation, Ottawa, Ont 3,721 

PC 1983—2485, August 10, 1983, remission of 
the customs duty and sales tax on television sets 
imported by Matsushita Industrial Canada Limited: 

Matsushita Industrial Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont .. 250,000 

PC 1983—2525, August 10, 1983, provides for 
the remission of customs duty on spirits, wine or 
flavoring materials having a spirit content, imported 
for the purpose of being blended in a distillery with 
spirits in bond: 

Alberta Distillers Limited, Burlington, Ont 640,7 1 9 

Canadian Mist Distillers Limited, Collingwood, Ont .... 1 2,2 1 7, 1 40 

Corby Distilleries Limited, Corbyville, Ont 491,733 

Gilbey Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 38,201 

Hiram Walker and Sons Limited, Windfield, BC 28,128 

Hiram Walker and Sons Limited, Windsor, Ont 6,277,568 

McGuiness Distillers Limited, Toronto, Ont 4,283,590 

Meaghers, Montreal, Que 1,327,249 

Melchers, Berthierville, Que 154,501 

Melville, Chomedey Laval, Que 28,458 

Potter Distilleries Limited, Langley, BC 1,536,985 

Rieder Distillery Limited, Grimsby, Ont 561,377 

Rumark Rums Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 801,825 

Seagram, La Salle, Que 13,817,226 

42.204.700 
PC 1983—2797, September 15, 1983, remission 
of customs duty and the sales tax on the duty in 
respect of xenon lighting equipment for use by the 
Niagara Falls Illumination Board in illuminating 
the falls at Niagara Falls: 

Niagara Parks Commission, Niagara Falls, Ont 

PC 1983—7/2832, September 15, 1983, remission 
of customs duty paid in respect of the temporary use 
in Canada of the foreign flag vessel M/V Rimba 
Balau for one voyage to transport two shunter ves- 
sels from Toronto, Ontario to Vancouver, British 
Columbia: 

Federal Commerce and Navigation Limited, Mon- 
treal, Que 

PC 1983—2988, September 29, 1983, remission 
of customs duty on materials and components 
imported by Bristol Aerospace Limited, Winnipeg, 
Manitoba, for use in the manufacture of Black 
Brant Upper Atmosphere Research Vehicles: 

Bristol Aerospace Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

PC 1983—2989, September 29, 1983, remission 
of customs duty and sales tax on automotive ma- 
chinery and equipment imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 158,146 

Long Manufacturing Division of Borg — Warner 

(Canada) Limited, Oakville, Ont 14,456 

Remissions of less than $1,000 429 

173.031 



2,729 



22,917 



89,667 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



13-37 



PC 1983 — 3138, October 6, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and part of the sales tax on official 
airline guide catalogues imported by Professional 
Courier Limited, Mississauga, Ontario: 

Professional Courier Limited, Mississauga, Ont 101,399 

PC 1983—3413, November 3, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on automotive ma- 
chinery and equipment imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

F Jos Lamb Company Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1983—3414, November 3, 1983, remission of 
customs duty on shade fabrics imported for use in 
growing horticultural crops: 

583149 Ontario Limited, Simcoe, Ont 

Growers Technical Services, Mississauga, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1983—3532, November 17, 1983, remission 
of customs duties on certain implants for use in 
fattening cattle: 

Provincial Livestock Supplies Limited, Lethbridge, 

Alta 

United Co-operative of Ontario, Guelph, Ont 



19,386 

18,108 

805 

38.299 



18,253 

18,218 

1,419 

37.890 



3,102 
1,920 
5.022 



PC 1983—3663, November 24, 1983, remission 
of customs duty on radio reference commercials and 
a portion of the sales tax on radio and television 
reference commercials: 

Airdale Traffic Services Limited, Toronto, Ont 4,709 

Bcrverlcy Briggs, Toronto, Ont 1,705 

Berger King Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 10,796 

CBC, Toronto, Ont 5,946 

Campbell Ewald (Canada) Limited, Toronto, Ont 1 6,649 

Carder Grey Advertising Incorporated, Toronto, Ont .. 2,681 

Carling O'Keefe Limited, Toronto, Ont 2,138 

Chartoff Productions, Toronto, Ont 22,508 

Cineservice Film Distributors, Toronto, Ont 3,708 

Coca-Cola Limited, Toronto, Ont 11,760 

Comprehensive Distributors Limited, Toronto, Ont 36,925 

Dalton/Fenske and Friends, Toronto, Ont 16,231 

D'arcy — MacManus and Musiais, Toronto, Ont 22,790 

David Delong Film and Tape Production, Toronto, 

Ont 4.039 

Doyle Dane and Bernbach Advertising, Toronto, Ont .. 1,458 

Epson Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 1.192 

Foote Cone and Belding Advertising Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 24,097 

Forbes Film Service, Toronto, Ont L876 

Grey Advertising Limited, Toronto, Ont 19,746 

Hayhurst Advertising, Toronto, Ont 37,025 

Heather Reid and Association, Toronto, Ont 1 ,430 

Home Shoppe Limited The, Toronto, Ont 1,945 

K-Tel International, Winnipeg, Man 2,329 

Kelloggs— Salada Canada Limited, Toronto,, Ont 52,470 

Kert Advertising Limited, Toronto, Ont 1,134 

Leo Burnette Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 142,795 



Lever Detergents Limited, Toronto, Ont 

MacLaren Advertising, Toronto, Ont 

McBain Advertising Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

McCann — Erickson Advertising, Toronto, Ont 

McDonalds Restaurant of Canada Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

McLaren Advertising, Windsor, Ont 

McWaters — Vanlint and Associates, Toronto, Ont 

Needham Harper Steers of Canada Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

Ogilivy and Mather Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Partners Film Company The, Toronto, Ont 

Peac — Media Research Incorporated, Toronto, Ont .... 

Pepsi Cola Canada Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Planicom PNMD, Montreal, Que 

Procter and Gamble Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Ronalds — Reynolds and Company Limited, Toronto, 

Ont 

SMW Advertising, Toronto, Ont 

SSC and B Lintas Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Scali McCabe Sloves (Canada) Limited Toronto, Ont 

ScoUard Production, Toronto, Ont 

Ted Bates Advertising Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Thompson J Walter Company, Toronto, Ont 

Vickers and Benson Limited, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1983—4010, December 15, 1983, remission of 
customs duties and sales tax on automotive ma- 
chinery and equipment imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Bombardier Incorporated, Valcourt, Que 



PC 1984 — 52, January 11, 1984, remission of 
customs duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts 
and accessories and parts thereof Wiltsie Truck 
Bodies Limited: 

Wiltsie Truck Bodies, Aylmer, Ont 



PC 1984 — 53, January 23, 1984, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Les Carrosseries Fontaine (1979) Limitee: 

Les Carrosseries Fontaine Limitee, Cowansville, Que 

Les Equipements Twin, Montreal, Que 

Montreal Refer Service, Montreal, Que 



PC 1984 — 54, January 11, 1984, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Western Utilities Equipment Company Limited: 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984—55, January 11, 1984, authorized 
remission of customs duty and sales tax on ma- 
chinery and equipment for the production of origi- 
nal parts and accessories for automobiles imported 
into Canada by certain specified companies: 

Tri-Way Machine Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Valiant Machine and Tool Incorporated, Windsor, 

Ont 



30,387 

15,529 

12,287 

110,708 

4,989 

2,884 

21,674 

35,409 
55,717 
6.307 
2,338 
7,519 
2,472 
98.600 

4.028 
1.069 
1,316 

26.773 
4.527 

48.124 

51,136 
4,279 

30,362 
1.028.516 



181,440 



2,634 



1,987 
13,991 

8.980 
24.958 



2.083 



1.880 

4.774 
6.654 



13*38 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE- 



-Continued 



PC 1984 — 233, January 26, 1984, authorized 
remission of customs duty and sales tax on ma- 
chinery and equipment for the production of origi- 
nal parts and accessories for automobiles imported 
into Canada by certain specified companies: 

F Jos Lamb Company Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 
Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1984—3/680, February 23, 1984, remission of 
the customs duty on downhill ski boots and parts or 
materials for use in the manufacture of downhill ski 
boots: 

Esprit Sports Division Warrington Limited, Missis- 

sauga, Ont 

Gamebridge Incorporated, St- Jerome, Que 



PC 1984—754, March 8, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Newcor Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 



PC 1984—860, March 15, 1984, remission of 
customs duty on polypropylene filament yarns: 

Spinto Limitee, Granby, Que 

PC 1984—867, March 15, 1984, remission of 
customs duty, excise taxes and sales tax on goods 
imported for meetings in Canada of foreign organi- 
zations in substitution therefore: 

MM Roper Sales Corporation, Kankakee, USA 

The Nucleus Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984—6/918, March 15, 1984, remission of 
the customs duty and a portion of the sales tax paid 
on specified importations of shop towels by North- 
ern Commercial Corporation: 

Northern Commercial Corporation, Montreal, Que 

PC 1984—965, March 22, 1984, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on laminated glass 
dinnerware: 

Cassidy Limited, Montreal, Que 

Corning Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1984—1148, April 5, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Hull Thomson Limited, Windsor, Ont 



50,793 

606 

51,399 



42,459 
29,372 
71.831 



9,082 



32,707 



1,130 

3,662 

323,523 

328.315 



8,474 



4,829 

658,411 

632 

663.872 



48,769 
11,636 
60.405 



PC 1984 — 1 149, April 5, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty on certain vegetables imported for 
processing: 

Berryland Canning Company Limited, Haney, BC 38,093 

Campbell Soup Company Limited, Toronto, Ont 18,366 

Canadian Canners Limited, Hamilton, Ont 9,056 

Fraser Valley Frosted Foods, Chilli wack, BC 12,416 

Girard Incorporated, St-Cesaire, Que 1,664 

H J Heinz Company of Canada Limited, Leamington, 

Ont 112,638 

Hunt — Wesson Division Morton Simon Canada Lim- 
ited, Tilbury, Ont 68,880 

Prime Foods Limited, Cottam, Ont 12,035 

Strub Brothers Limited, Dundas, Ont 11,121 

Snyder and Sons Limited, Bedford, Que 17,652 

Sun Brite Canning Limited, Ruthven, Ont 5,582 

Thomas Canning Company, Maidstone, Ont 22,404 

Topaz Company, St Thomas, Ont 13,800 

343.707 
PC 1984 — 9/1369, to remit to Hawker Siddeley 
Canada Incorporated, the sum of $2,080,000 which 
represents a portion of the customs duty paid on 
goods used in the manufacture of subway cars for 
the Toronto Transit Commission on condition that a 
claim for remission is made to the Minister of 
National Revenue prior to June 30, 1984: 

Hawker Siddeley Canada Incorporated, Toronto, Ont.. 2,080,000 

PC 1984—1544, May 10, 1984, to amend the 
Television Chassis and Components remission order 
made by Order in Council, PC 1979—3494: 

Itachi (HSC) Canada Incorporated, Pointe-Claire, 

Que 

Proconic Electronics Limited, Vancouver, BC 

PC 1984—1559, May 10, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on bus chassis and specified 
commercial vehicles, parts and accessories and parts 
thereof of International Harvester Canada Limited: 

International Harvester Canada Limited, Hamilton, 
Ont 21,083,074 

PC 1984—1759, May 24, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Budd Canada Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont 

General Motors of Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Geophysical Service Incorporated, Richmond Hill, 

Ont 

Teledyne Precision Canada, Rexdale, Ont 

PC 1984—1760, May 24, 1984, remission of duty 
and sales tax on machinery and equipment for the 
production of original parts and accessories for 
automobiles imported into Canada by certain speci- 
fied companies: 

General Motors of Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 123,699 

Fabricated Steel Products Limited, Windsor, Ont 1,981 



304,519 
134,006 
438.525 



67,064 
37,557 

16,943 

23,956 

145,520 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*39 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



National Auto Radiator Company Limited, Windsor, 

Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984 — 2048, June 14, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty on chemicals and photomasks used in the 
production of semiconductor devices imported by 
Mitel Corporation: 

Mitel Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1984 — 2051, June 14, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales and excise taxes on boats and 
related equipment imported into Canada by Canadi- 
an residents for training purposes for the Transat 
Tag Quebec-Saint Malo and Le Challenge Labatt 
Canada race: 

M Yvon Dufeur, Ste-Foy, Que 

Rene Gauthier, Quebec, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984 — 2/2311, June 28, 1984, remission of 
customs duty on certain playing card stock imported 
by or on behalf of Estrie Graphics Incorporated, 
Sherbrooke, Quebec: 

Graphique Estrie Incorporee, Sherbrooke, Que 

PC 1984—3/2311, June 28, 1984, to remit the 
customs duty, up to an aggregate amount not 
exceeding $1 10,000 paid or payable under Schedule 
A of the Customs Tariff on plant equipment import- 
ed during the calendar year 1983, 1984 and 1985 
for use by Composite Technology (Canada) Limited 
in the aircraft components repair and testing facili- 
ties at its plant at Winnipeg, Manitoba: 

Composite Technology (Canada) Limited, Winnipeg, 
Man 

PC 1984 — 2331, June 28, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
SMI Industries Canada Limited: 

SMI Industries Canada Limited, Bathurst, NB 

SMI Industries Canada Limitee, Ste-Foy, Que 

SMI Industries, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984 — 2332, June 28, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on automobiles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof of Bombardier Incor- 
porated, Logistic Equipment Division: 

Arrow/Cesco Electronics Limited, Montreal, Que 

Bombardier Incorporated, Montreal, Que 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984 — 2508, July 12, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 



1,381 

725 
127.786 



1,483 

268 

1,751 



73,901 

204,820 

79 

278.800 



13,759 



64,965 



12,162 

6,142 

952 

151 

19.407 



5,116 

1,152 

68 

6,336 



Peabody Myers (Canada), division of Peabody 
International Canada Limited: 



Peabody — Myers Sunvac Division, Laval, Que. 
Peabody Solid Waste of Canada, Laval, Que ... 



PC 1984 — 2509, July 12, 1984, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on specified commercial 
vehicles, parts and accessories and parts thereof of 
Les Carrosseries Parco Incorporee: 

Carrosserie Parco Incorporee, Laval, Que 



PC 1984—2813, April 8, 1984, to amend the 
Cattle Implant Remission order made by OIC PC 
1982—1717 of 10th June 1982, in accordance with 
the schedule hereto: 

Canada Packers Company, St-Hyacinthe, Que 

PC 1984—5/2816, August 8, 1984, to remit the 
duty paid or payable on the MV Cicero, a roll-on/ 
roll-off trailer and container ship owned by Fednay 
Limited: 

Burnett Steamship Company Limited, Montreal, Que 
Quantetics Corporation, Ottawa, Ont 



PC 1984 — 2826, August 8, 1984, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain companies: 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

NETP Limited, Niagara Falls, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1984 — 3103, August 31, 1984, remission of 
customs duty on imports of unmanufactured flue- 
cured tobacco: 

Benson and Hedges (Canada) Incorporated, Tillson- 
burg, Ont 

PC 1984 — 3114, August 31, 1984, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 



PC 1984 — 3798, November 29, 1984, remission 
of customs duty and sales tax on goods imported in 
connection with the acquisition by the Government 
of Canada of Armoured Vehicles General Purpose 
and defence supplies associated therewith: 

Canadian Arsenals Limited, Le Gardeur, Que 

Diesel Division GM of Canada Limited, London, Ont.. 
Michelin Tires (Canada) Limited, St-Laurent, Que .... 
Remissions of less than $1,000 

if- 1 



4,826 

8.491 

13,317 



11,026 



2,276 



2,000,000 

966,979 

2,966,979 



3,065 

3,500 

324 

6,889 



135,878 



20,640 

787 
21,427 



37,706 

15,312 

48,706 

2,051 

103,775 



13*40 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1984—3799, November 29, 1984, remission 
of the customs duty paid or payable on the sailing 
vessel, "Elinor": 

Fondation Boscoville, Montreal, Que 67,450 

PC 1984—5/3853, November 29, 1984, to remit 
the customs duty paid under Cobourg, Ontario, 
Entry No. HI 03891 of February 20, 1984, on 
10,058 two litre cans for use in packaging maple 
syrup: 

Curie's Maple Products, Toronto, Ont 1,565 

PC 1984—4091, December 20, 1984, the remis- 
sion of a portion of the customs duty and sales tax 
paid on Hand Held Electronic Computer Games 
imported by Tandy Electronics Limited: 

A and A Canada Division of Tandy Electronics, Van- 
couver, BC 

PC 1985—72, January 17, 1985, the remission of 
customs duty on potatoes imported for use in the 
manufacture of potato chips: 

Humpty Dumpty Foods Limited, Hartland, NB 

Humpty Dumpty, Montreal, Que 

Laurentide Potato Chips, Montreal, Que 

Old Dutch Foods Limited, Winnipeg, Man 

PC 1985—2/150, January 1, 1985, remission of 
customs duty and part of the sales tax on a fabric 
roof imported for the Lindsay Park Aquatic Centre 
and Fieldhouse, Calgary, Alberta: 

Birdair Structures, Calgary, Alta 

PC 1985—275, January 31, 1985, remission of 
customs duty on certain quantities of canned pork 
imported from the People's Republic of China by 
the Hingchong Trading Corporation: 

Hingchong Trading Corporation, Toronto, Ont 

PC 1985—277, January 31, 1985, remission of 
the customs duty and the sales tax on computer 
carrier media: 

Candle Corporation, Montreal, Que 

Fiducie du Quebec, Montreal, Que 

Government of Alberta, Calgary, Alta 

Krug Furniture Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont 

Siirete du Quebec, Montreal, Que 

Via Rail Canada, Montreal, Que 

WT Electronic Retail Solution Incorporated, Calgary, 

Alta 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1985—362, February 7, 1985, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Volkswagen Canada Incorporated, Barrie, Ont 80,516 



147,899 



2,746 
19,353 

5,069 
42,931 
70.099 



297,476 



1,722 



5,649 
1,275 
1,239 
1,393 
1,308 
1,572 

1,430 
61,356 
75,222 



PC 1985—364, February 7, 1985, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specified companies: 

Geophysical Services Incorporated, Richmond Hill, 

Ont 

Lear Siegler Industries Limited, Kitchener, Ont 

PC 1985—365, February 7, 1985, remission of 
customs duty and sales tax on machinery and equip- 
ment for the production of original parts and acces- 
sories for automobiles imported into Canada by 
certain specifled companies: 

Beckers Lay Tech Incorporated, Kitchener, Ont 

Chrysler Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

General Motors of Canada Limited, Windsor, Ont 

Geophysical Services Incorporated, Richmond Hill, 

Ont 

Remissions of less than $1,000 

PC 1985—5/872, March 14, 1985, remission of 
sales tax on poppies and wreathes produced and sold 
during the period April 1, 1980 to March 31, 1984: 

Vetcraft Shops, Charlottetown, PEI 

Total Customs and Excise 



7,296 
61,094 
68,390 



5,803 

140,419 

68,457 

6,484 

595 

221.758 



376,928 
850,115,240 



Other remissions were granted as follows: 

PC 1945—88/2969, April 25, 1945, remission of 
excise taxes paid or payable by the Governor General. 

PC 1954 — 26/1904, December 8, 1954, remission 
granted to members of NATO on automobiles pur- 
chased in Canada. 

PC 1955—1/350, March 12, 1955, goods imported 
into Canada solely and exclusively for the construc- 
tion, maintenance and operation of project Dew Line. 

PC 1966 — 545, March 23, 1966, remission of excise 
taxes on Canadian engines returned to Canada after 
having been exported for repair purposes. 

PC 1970—1835, October 21, 1970, provided under 
prescribed conditions with respect to Canadian articles 
exported and re-imported for the remission of all or 
part of the customs duties and excise taxes payable in 
excess of the amounts properly assessed on the cost of 
repairs made processing or equipment added outside of 
Canada. 

PC 1972—583, March 28, 1972, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof. 

PC 1972 — 1244, June 6, 1972, remission of customs 
duties and excise taxes on certain goods imported 
through customs postal branches. 

PC 1973—228, January 30, 1973, remission of sales 
tax on domestically manufactured aircraft used for 
demonstration to prospective customers. 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT ^ 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13'4I 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Continued 



PC 1973—745, March 27, 1973, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes in respect of the tempo- 
rary entry of specified articles imported for the special 
uses set forth in Schedule "A" of the order. 

PC 1973—2529, August 21, 1973, remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes on goods for use in 
cases of emergency. 

PC 1974 — 1/1188, May 30, 1974, remission of the 
customs duties paid or payable on nylon staple fibres 
for use in the manufacture of moulded car mats to be 
supplied as original equipment parts to the Canadian 
automobile manufacturers. 

PC 1974—2246, October 8, 1974, remission of 
excise taxes payable by diplomats and others repre- 
senting another country. 

PC 1974 — 2522, November 19, 1974, remission of 
customs duty and excise taxes paid or payable on 
certain kinds of advertising material. 

PC 1974—2523, November 19, 1974, remission of 
customs duties and excise taxes paid or payable on 
commercial samples temporarily imported for exhibi- 
tion or demonstration. 

PC 1975—287, February 11, 1975, partial remis- 
sion of sales tax on aircraft temporarily exported from 
Canada in fulfillment of a contract for commercial air 
service. 

PC 1975—1973, August 27, 1975, remission of 
customs duties paid or payable on various types of 
railway rolling stock entering Canada for use in inter- 
national service (railway rolling stock departmental 
service remission order No 2). 

PC 1976—17/3066, December 9, 1976, remission of 
air transportation tax paid or payable in accordance 
with Part II of the Excise Tax Act with respect to the 
transportation of United States personnel to or from 
the joint Canada, United States defence project "Dew 
Line" for the purpose of its construction, maintenance 
or operation. 

PC 1977—1682, June 16, 1977, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes on the importation of 
household goods by a seasonal resident. 

PC 1978—763, March 16, 1978, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof. 

PC 1978—1724, May 25, 1978, remission of cus- 
toms duty on specified commercial vehicles, parts and 
accessories and parts thereof. 

PC 197-8-2023, June 22, 1978, remission of cus- 
toms duties and excise taxes on vehicles and baggage 
temporarily imported by non-residents. 

PC 1978—2963, September 27, 1978, remission of 
sales and excise taxes on motor vehicles purchased or 
imported by diplomatic and other representatives of 
foreign countries without payment of sales and excise 
taxes and after two years diverted to taxable use. 



PC 1978—3279, October 26, 1978, remission of 
penalty of less than $10 in respect of late payment of 
tax imposed under Part III, IV or V of the Excise Tax 
Act. 

PC 1980—875, April 3, 1980, remission of customs 
duty on certain goods used in the production of compo- 
nents for certain aircraft. 

PC 1981—488, February 26, 1981, remission of 
customs duty and sales taxes on ballet shoes. 

PC 1981—1955, July 16, 1981, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on specified commercial vehi- 
cles, parts and accessories and parts thereof. 

PC 1982—197, January 21, 1982, remission of 
duties, sales and excise taxes on certain imported 
goods transported into Canada by courier services. 

PC 1982—5/1702, June 3, 1982, remission of cus- 
toms duties paid or payable on three electronic power 
conditioning units manufactured by GEC rectifiers of 
Stafford, England, imported by Urban Transportation 
Development Corporation Limited for use in rapid 
transit vehicles. 

PC 1982—2622, September 3, 1982, remission of 
fifty per cent of the sales tax paid or payable on 
certain retail scales capable of being converted to 
metric, imported or sold during the period beginning 
July 1, 1981 and ending December 31, 1983. 

PC 1983—1436, May 12, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty on certain fruits and vegetables imported 
for processing. 

PC 1983—1437, May 12, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty on replacement dielectric Huids for 
transformers. 

PC 1983—1439, May 12, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty and sales tax on buses, parts and accessories 
and parts thereof of Girardin Vehicles Industries. 

PC 1983—2335, July 27, 1983, remission of cus- 
toms duty paid or payable under Schedule A to the 
Customs Tariff on computer generated mailing lists 
imported during the period commencing on February 
14, 1972 and ending on June 30, 1985. 

PC 1983—3769, November 30, 1983, remission of 
customs duty and sales and excise taxes on certain 
goods imported into or purchased in Canada in con- 
nection with the 1986 World Exposition on Transpor- 
tation. 

PC 1983—3776, November 30, 1983, remission of 
air transportation tax on transportation beginning and 
ending outside Canada that does not include an inter- 
mediate stop in Canada other than a transfer stop or a 
technical landing. 

PC 1984 — 31 19, August 31, 1984, remission of sales 
tax paid or payable on certain snowshoes manufac- 
tured or proiduced in Canada and sold during the 
period beginning February 13, 1984 and ending 
December 31, 1984. 



13 '42 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
CUSTOMS AND EXCISE— Concluded 



PC 1984—3685, November 15, 1984, remission of 
customs duty, sales and excise taxes on certain articles 
imported by Pringle and Booth Limited. 

PC 1985—85, January 17, 1985, remission of the 
sales and excise taxes paid or payable on the amount 
of anti-dumping or countervailing duty included in the 
duty paid value of goods imported into Canada. 



TAXATION 



Remissions of income tax: 

Barbeau, Gisele 

Preville Lumber Products Inc 



PC 1985—6/538 dated February 14, 1985, 
authorizes the remission of $1,287, $1,417 and 
$1,237 for the 1969, 1970 and 1971 taxation years 
respectively to Gisele Barbeau. 

PC 1985—5/538 dated February 14, 1985, 
authorizes the remission of $898 for the 1970 taxa- 
tion year to Preville Lumber Products Inc. 

Preville Lumber Products Inc was audited for the 

1968 to 1971 taxation years. The company was 
declared to be a personal corporation because the 
source of the income was entirely investments. All 
income was declared to be income of Mr Camille 
Barbeau and all expenses disallowed. These 
expenses included wages to his wife, Mrs Gisele 
Barbeau. Reassessments were issued for 1968 to 
increase the income of Mr Camille Barbeau and 
decrease the assessments for Preville Lumber Prod- 
ucts Inc and Mrs Gisele Barbeau. Mr Barbeau 
appealed the decision and the Federal Court denied 
his appeal on November 2, 1981. 

Reassessments were never processed for Mrs Bar- 
beau and Preville Lumber Products Inc for the years 

1969 to 1971. As the same income was assessed in 
the hands of two or more taxpayers, the remissions 
are granted. 

Beique, Jacqueline 

PC 1985—7/711 dated March 7, 1985, author- 
ized the remission of $1,698, $1,571, $533, $2,284 
and $2,312 plus relevant interest for the 1972, 1973, 
1974, 1977 and 1978 taxation years respectively. 

Half of the income of the taxpayer's late husband 
was declared by him and half by his wife on the 
basis that they were entitled to do so because of the 
community of property that existed between them. 
His 1972 to 1979 returns were reassessed to include 
that portion of his income reported by his wife. Her 
1975 and 1976 returns were also reassessed to delete 
the income for those years only. 

As the 1972, 1973, 1974, 1977 and 1978 returns 
are now statute-barred, the remission was granted 
because of double taxation. 

Chevron Standard Limited 



3,941 



8,398 



PC 1984—1758 dated May 24, 1984, authorized 
the remission of $90 million to Chevron Standard 
Limited in respect of the 1975 to 1982 taxation 
years. The Order is conditional upon Chevron 
Standard Limited discontinuing all outstanding 
actions in the Federal Court of Canada, withdraw- 
ing all notices of objection and refraining from 
commencing any court actions claiming a reduction 
in taxes payable by reason of: 

(1) the non-inclusion or deduction of provincial royal- 
ties, the petroleum and gas revenue tax, or the 
proceeds of disposition deemed received under 
Section 69(6) of the Act, and 

(2) the non-application of the special tax on corpora- 
tions under Part XIV of the Act. 

In addition Chevron Standard Limited must pro- 
vide to Revenue Canada, Taxation a written desig- 
nation that Chevron Resources Limited receive the 
amounts remitted. 

The remission is to be satisfied by permitting 
Chevron Canada Resources Limited to reduce taxes 
otherwise payable for 1983 and subsequent by an 
amount equal to the lesser of $15 million or the tax 
otherwise payable by it until the full $90 million is 
utilized. Should the full $90 million not be remitted 
by 1988 the outstanding balance will be paid during 
the 1989 taxation year to Chevron Canada 
Resources Limited. For greater certainty no part of 
the remission amount is to be considered as interest 
and no taxes including withholding taxes. Part XIV 
tax, interest, or penalties shall be imposed upon 
Chevron Standard Limited or Chevron Canada 
Resources Limited by reason only of the remission. 

Dominion Engineering Works Ltd 

PC 1984—1/3714 dated November 15, 1984, 
remits income tax in the amount of $91,363 plus 
relevant interest payable for the 1977 taxation year. 

A reassessment for 1977 disallowed the manufac- 
turing and processing tax credit on the grounds that 
the income involved was Canadian investment 
income. As this reassessment was against Head 
Office Policy, the remission was approved. 

Doran, John B 

PC 1985—1/151 dated January 15, 1985, author- 
ized the remission of $1,101 for the 1978 taxation 
year. The taxpayer in 1981 was certified legally 
incompetent as a result of an accident. Mrs Doran 
was appointed curatrice for her husband. In 1983 
after a robbery at their residence Mrs Doran deter- 
mined that income tax returns for her husband and 
for herself were not filed and as a result he had lost 
his entitlement to a refund due to the requirement 
that refund claims be made within four years. The 
remission was approved for humanitarian reasons 
because of the financial burden on the family. 

Hamilton Brothers Oil and Gas Corporation 



91,363 



1,101 



10,786,620 



15,000,000 



PC 1985—703 dated March 7, 1985, authorized 
the remission of $675,670, $2,220,049, $955,119, 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Continued 



13*43 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
TAXATION— Con/mwe^ 



$2,191,065, $3,152,781 and $1,591,936 plus any 
interest or penalty for the taxation years 1974, 
1975, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979 respectively. 

On condition that the taxpayer withdraws all 
further litigation, the non-inclusion of income under 
subsection 69(6) and the non-application of the 
special tax under Part XIV of the Income Tax Act 
is allowed. The remission is conditional on the bal- 
ance of tax owing being paid as outlined in an 
agreed upon schedule. 

Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas Company Remission Order 

PC 1985—343 dated February 5, 1985, author- 
ized the remission for the period ending after 1981 
and before 1984, the amount of income tax payable 
under Part 1 exceeds the amount of tax that would 
be payable if any outlay or expense incurred by 
Dome Energy before January 1, 1985 and related to 
the acquisition of capital stock of Hudson's Bay Oil 
and Gas Company is allowed. 

A remission is also granted for each year after 
1983 and before 1991, the amount of tax, interest 
and penalties payable which exceeds the amount of 
tax, interest and penalties payable which is related 
to the acquisition of the capital stock by Dome 
Energy. 

Isolated Posts Housing and Travel Assistance Benefits 
Remission Order 

PC 1984—3792 dated November 29, 1984, 
authorized the remission of income tax on housing 
benefits and travel assistance benefits received or 
enjoyed by employees at isolated posts in the 1983, 
1984, and 1985 taxation years. 

Isolated Posts Benefits and Allowances Remission 
Order, Amendment 

PC 1984—3791 dated November 29, 1984, this 
amendment extends the application of PC 1980 — 
1717 June 26, 1980 to the 1983, 1984 and 1985 
taxation years. 

Jones, Gwellyn 

PC 1985—2/247 dated January 24, 1985, remits 
income tax, penalties, and relevant interest for 1974, 
1975, and 1976. 

On December 13, 1977 the taxpayer was assessed 
on apparent unreported wages. In addition 163(2) 
penalties were assessed. The request for a two 
month .extension to submit additional information 
was denied. When the Department sent a collection 
notice in 1980 the taxpayer advised the taxes were 
paid on these amounts when earned. 

The Department replied that notice of objection 
had not been received within 90 days of reassess- 
ment. The taxpayer advised that he had contacted 
the district office upon receipt of the notices of 
reassessment and that constitued a notice of objec- 
tion as far as he was concerned. 

The taxpayer provided documentation which 
indicated the reassessments contained some errors. 



In view of the Departmental error and that he did 
indirectly object to the reassessments a remission 
was granted. 

Lafond & Frires Auto Inc 



8,275 



PC 1984—2/3471 dated October 25, 1984, 
authorized the remission of 1978 Income Tax and 
interest. 

As a result of an audit the taxpayer and its 
shareholders were reassessed. The Department of 
justice agreed to a debt settlement and the share- 
holders paid their portion of the debt. The taxpayer 
did not understand that pursuant to the settlement 
an amount was owing by the company and the 
shareholders. Since a Consent to Judgement had 
been filed with the Court, the taxpayer was preclud- 
ed from raising further argument in this matter. A 
remission was recommended as the shareholders and 
corporation are in severe financial difficulty and 
bankrutcy would be imminent if the tax liability was 
not extinguished. 

Liberian Iron Ore Limited Remission Order 

PC 1984 — 3527 dated November 1, 1984, remits 
for the 1976 and subsequent taxation years income 
tax payable arising as a result of the redemption of 
Series C Preferred Shares of the capital stock of 
Liberian American — Swedish Minerals Company 
owned and acquired in exchange for certain deben- 
tures. The tax to be remitted is equal to the amount, 
which would have been payable if the signed Cana- 
da — Liberian Tax Convention had been ratified. 

Ocic, Zeljko 

PC 1984—2/3375 dated October 18, 1984, 
authorized the remission of tax and interest for 
1975, 1976 and 1977. The taxpayer filed for 1976 to 
1977 as being self-employed. The 1974 return was 
reassessed to disallow expenses claimed and treat 
the taxpayer has being an employee. Subsequent to 
this 1975 and 1976 were reassessed but self-employ- 
ment income was not adjusted to a calendar year 
2,864 basis which resulted in double taxation. Because of 

departmental error as well as the effort made by the 
taxpayer to correct the matter, a remission was 
granted. 

Pechiney Quebec Inc 

PC 1984—3581 dated November 1, 1984, author- 
ized the remission of non-resident tax paid on inter- 
est payable to eight non-resident French Banks in 
relation to project loans taken to finance the 
aluminium smelter project at Becancour, Quebec. 

Quebec Forward Averaged Income 1982 Tax Remis- 
sion Order 

PC 1984—2894 dated August 23, 1984, provides 
for the remission of income tax in respect of forward 
averaged income earned in the Province of Quebec 
in 1982. 



1,678 



Regimbald, Maurice 



2,982 



13*44 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Remissions of tax, fee or penalty — Concluded 



NATIONAL REVENUE- 
TAXATION— Co/ic/Mc/e</ 



PC 1984—9/1630 dated May 10, 1984, author- 
ized the remission of $1,580 tax payable, penalty of 
$41, and interest of $1,361 in respect of the 1973 
taxation year. 

In 1976 the taxpayer was assessed to include 
$10,918 in 1973 income pursuant to a T4A Slip. 
The notice of assessment was returned as undeliver- 
able. In 1979 the taxpayer submitted an affidavit 
that he never worked for the payor. The payor had 
no records for 1973 and cannot confirm the pay- 
ment. The remission was granted as the taxpayer 
lived partly on welfare in 1978 and 1979, his income 
is low, enforcement of the reassessment would cause 
undue hardship, and the payor cannot confirm the 
alleged payment. 

Ronaldo Ouellet Ltee 



PC 1984—2/2684 dated July 25, 1984, author- 
ized the remission of income tax and interest to the 
extent of $12,858 for the taxation years 1976 and 
1977. 

In 1980 the taxpayer was reassessed to disallow 
expenses on the basis of information received from 
the Province of Quebec. When Quebec subsequently 
reversed these assessments it was too late for the 
taxpayer to file an objection or to obtain an 
extension. 

Since the assessments were erroneous and could 
not be corrected within the required time, a remis- 
sion was granted. 

Simon, Barbara 

PC 1984—8/1630 dated May 10, 1984, author- 
ized the remission of $1,226 income tax in respect of 
1975 and 1976. 

The remission was granted as the department 
neglected to make adjustments for the married 
exemption and to allow additional medical expenses 
for these years. A hardship situation exists due to 
her late husband's financial difficulties and her own 
modest income. 

Townsend, Estate of Mrs Louise P 



PC 1985—9/1041 dated March 28, 1985, author- 
ized the remission of $2,287 late filing penalty in 
respect of the 1980 taxation year. 

The Townsend family resided in Pennsylvania and 
owned a summer vacation home in Ontario. Mrs 



12,858 



1,226 



2,287 



$ 

Townsend inherited the home from her husband. On 
her death, there was considerable confusion as to 
whether there was any consequential capital gains 
tax with regard to the summer vacation home and as 
a result, there was a delay in filing returns. The 
confusion arose with regard to the Canada-US Tax 
Treaty. It was finally decided that the Treaty 
offered no protection in the case of deemed 
dispositions. 

Since the delay in filing returns was due in part to 
misleading information provided by Revenue offi- 
cials, a remission of the late-filing penalty was 
approved. 

Woods, Edmund James 2,986 

PC 1985—8/711 dated March 7, 1985, author- 
ized the remission of $522 and $2,464 for the 1977 
and 1 978 taxation years respectively. 

The taxpayer, a Winnipeg fireman, suffered a 
heart attack in 1977. He was initially denied work- 
men's compensation but received his fireman's pay 
until May, 1979. In 1984, he was finally awarded 
compensation. In the years in question, his pay was 
taxable but the compensation was not. Since the 
City of Winnipeg is a self-insured employer and the 
taxpayer had received his pay, the City merely kept 
the compensation eventually awarded. 

Because the taxpayer paid more income tax than 
would have been payable had the compensation 
awarded not been unduly delayed, a remission of the 
extra tax in 1977 and 1978, now statute-barred, was 
approved. 

Remissions of less than $1,000 4,137 

Total Taxation 25,930,716 

Total National Revenue 876,045,956 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

Fees ordinarily payable for applications for proof 
of Canadian Citizenship filed by a person who has 
been invited by a Club or Organization to take part 
in a ceremony for the promotion of citizenship: 



Remissions of less than $1,000 
Total Secretary of State 



996 



996 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 13-45 

Debts, obligations and claims written off or forgiven 

Note: this information is required by Section 18(6) of the Financial Administration Act. The type of accounts and the type of 
deletions are indicated by the following codes: 

Account Deletion Code 

Memorandum accounts receivable Write-off A 

Memorandum accounts receivable Forgiveness B 

Asset accounts Write-off C 

Asset accounts Forgiveness D 

Ministerial Treasury Board Parliamentary 
authority authority authority Total 

Vote 
Code(') Number Amount Number Amount number Number Amount Number Amount 

s $ s s 

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN 

DEVELOPMENT— 
Canadian Arctic Producers Co-operative 

Limited C 2Ic. 1984-85 3 406,465 3 406,465 

Eskimo loan fund (interest) B 2 19,853(2) 2 19.853 

Indian housing assistance D L5 1 a, 1966-67 657 688,630 657 688.630 

LABOUR— 
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corpora- 
tion D 26b. 1984-85 1 307,600,000 1 307,600.000 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE— 
Canadian Sports Pool Corporation D 49b, 1984-85 1 20,000.000 1 20,000,000 

NATIONAL REVENUE— 

Customs and Excise A 2,538 11,264,710 2,538 11,264,710 

Taxation A 13,034 40,624,194 13,034 40,624,194 

PARLIAMENT— 
House of Commons A 244 111,313 244 111,313 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY- 

National Research Council of Canada A 43 22.833 43 22,833 

SOLICITOR GENERAL— 

Correctional Service A 12 1,590 12 1.590 

Parolees _D LI 03b, 1968-69 442 10,484(3) 442 10.484 

15,873 52.044,493 1,104 328,705,579 16,977 380,750,072 

(') See introductory paragraph above. 

(2) Interest of $19,853 forgiven pursuant to Vote 546, Appropriation Act No. 3, 1953 as amended. 

O) Vote LI 03b, Appropriation Act No. 1, 1969 authorizes the Minister, in the current and subsequent years, to forgive the repayment of a loan or any part thereof 
made to parolees for assistance in their rehabilitation. 



13*46 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered 

Note: this information is required by Section 31(3) of the Financial Administration Act. 
Summary of outstanding accountable advances 



Department and agency 



Advances 

outstanding 

as at March 31, 1985 


Advances 

settled 

in April 1985 


Advances 

outstanding 

as at April 30, 1985* 


Number 


Amount 


Number 


Amount 


Number 


Amount 




$ 




$ 




S 


1,072 


1,505,039 


1,021 


1,486,779 


51 


18,260 


409 
85 

227 
11 

156 
34 

922 


287,363 
62,406 

167,642 
9,928 

169,939 
19,646 

716.924 


403 
83 

121 
11 

133 
32 

783 


286,244 

61,966 

52,074 

9,928 

131,984 
17,601 

559.797 


6 

2 

106 

23 

2 

139 


1,119 

440 

115,568 

37.955 

2,045 

157.127 


965 

5 

970 


393,216 

1,700 

394.916 


874 

1 

875 


344,787 

500 

345.287 


91 

4 

95 


48,429 

1,200 

49.629 


5,938 

16 

5.954 


6,011,780 

11,765 

6.023.545 


5,608 

16 

5.624 


5,932,633 

11,765 

5.944.398 


330 
330 


79,147 
79.147 


625 
97 
81 

803 


462,975 
39,334 
53,400 

555.709 


557 
97 
81 

735 


426,600 
39,334 
53,400 

519.334 


68 
68 


36,375 
36.375 



AGRICULTURE— 

Department 

COMMUNICATIONS— 

Department 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission... 

National Film Board 

National Library 

National Museums of Canada 

Public Archives 

CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Restrictive Trade Practices Commission 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION— 

Department 

Immigration Appeal Board 

ENERGY, MINES AND RESOURCES— 

Department 

Atomic Energy Control Board 

National Energy Board 

ENVIRONMENT— 

Department 

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS— 

Department 

Canadian International Development Agency 

FINANCE— 

Department 

Auditor General 

Insurance 

FISHERIES AND OCEANS— 

Department 

GOVERNOR GENERAL 

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT— 

Department 

JUSTICE— 

Department 

Canadian Human Rights Commission 

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 

Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of Canada 

Supreme Court of Canada 

Tax Court of Canada 

LABOUR— 

Department 

Canada Labour Relations Board 

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE— 

Department 

Medical Research Council 

NATIONAL REVENUE— 

Customs and Excise 

Taxation 



2,010 



1,287 



971,330 



576,303 



1,860 



911,882 



1,233 



560,247 



150 



54 



59,448 



2,608 

262 

2.870 


8,444,539 

464,033 

8.908.572 


708 
214 
922 


5,328,338 

412,747 

5.741.085 


1,900 

48 

1.948 


3,116,201 

51,286 

3.167.487 


402 

177 

26 

605 


152,670 

175,595 

18,150 

346.415 


311 

175 

17 

503 


120,110 

174,125 

8,450 

302.685 


91 

2 

9 

102 


32,560 
1,470 
9,700 

43.730 


1,702 


801,190 


1,665 


791,619 


37 


9,571 


14 


9,859 


14 


9,859 







16,056 



305 

1 


79,243 
650 


218 
1 


52,978 
650 


87 


26,265 


46 


39,275 


21 


19,175 


25 


20,100 


5 


2,662 


5 


2,662 






■ 2 


520 


2 


520 






4 


900 


3 


600 


1 


300 


363 


123.250 


250 


76.585 


113 


46.665 


84 


58,459 


67 


44,178 


17 


14,281 


16 


6,975 


16 


6,975 






10 


12,937 


4 


2,659 


6 


10,278 


110 


78.371 


87 


53.812 


23 


24.559 


1,256 


601,061 


1,208 


583,799 


48 


17,262 


8 


1,408 


8 


1,408 






1.264 


602.469 


1.216 


585.207 


48 


17.262 


1,203 


598,632 


1,178 


591,926 


25 


6,706 


1,529 


1,019,773 


1,244 


824,700 


285 


195,073 


2.732 


1.618,405 


2.422 


1.416.626 


310 


201.779 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 



13 '47 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Summary of outstanding accountable advances — Concluded 



Advances 

outstanding 

as at March 31, 1985 



Advances 

settled 

in April 1985 



Advances 

outstanding 

as at April 30, 1985* 



Department and agency 



Number 



Amount 



Number 



Amount 



Number 



Amount 



31 



162 
15 
8 
8 

27 
220 



684 



25,379 



104.645 
5.549 
4.125 
2,765 
7,398 

124,482 



331.931 



PARLIAMENT— 
House of Commons 

PRIVY COUNCIL— 

Department 

Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 

Commissioner of Official Languages 

Economic Council of Canada 

Public Service Staff Relations Board 

PUBLIC WORKS— 

Department 

REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION— 

Department 

Foreign Investment Review Agency 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY— 

Ministry of State 

National Research Council of Canada 

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council 
Science Council of Canada 

SECRETARY OF STATE— 

Department 

Public Service Commission 

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council .... 

SOLICITOR GENERAL— 

Department 

Correctional Service 

National Parole Board 

... Royal Canadian Mounted Police 



SUPPLY AND SERVICES— 

Department — 

Services Program 207 188.343 

Supply Program 603 377.980 

Statistics Canada 236 124,880 

1.046 691.203 

TRANSPORT— 

Department 5,584 2,627.388 

Canadian Aviation Safety Board 94 65.027 

Canadian Transport Commission 187 154,020 

Northern Pipeline Agency 8 3,485 

Office of the Grain Transportation Agency Administrator 1 800 

5.874 2.850.720 

TREASURY BOARD— 

Secretariat 71 20,574 

Comptroller General 1 1 3,768 

82 24.342 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

Total 

* For details, see following statement called — "Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985". 



816 


467,722 


3 


3,605 


819 


471.327 


15 


4,926 


519 


350,967 


39 


10,339 


10 


5,919 


583 


372.151 


681 


264,204 


265 


154,910 


7 


18.100 


953 


437.214 


157 


87.045 


1.129 


452.267 


70 


36,261 


17 


3,650,112 


1.373 


4.225.685 



31 



160 
13 
8 
8 

27 
216 



616 



S 

25.379 

104.145 
5.442 
4,125 
2,765 
7,398 

123.875 

311,085 



594 


289,571 


2 


2,892 


596 


292.463 


12 


4,446 


505 


343,984 


39 


10,339 


10 


5,919 


566 


364.688 


635 


246.865 


184 


93.657 


7 


18.100 


826 


358.622 


85 


48,211 


1,038 


429,258 


65 


34,029 


17 


3.650.112 


1.205 


4,161,610 


207 


188,343 


511 


288,190 


235 


124,630 


953 


601.163 


5,521 


2,603,212 


23 


26,664 


174 


134,517 


4 


1,685 


1 


800 


5.723 


2.766.878 


62 


17.020 


9 


3.390 


71 


20.410 



2 
2 


500 
107 


4 


607 


68 


20.846 


222 

1 

223 


178.151 

713 

178.864 


3 
14 


480 
6.983 



17 



46 

81 

127 

72 

91 

5 

168 



63 

71 
13 
4 

151 



7.463 



17.339 
61.253 

78.592 

38,834 

23,009 

2,232 

64,075 



92 89,790 
1 250 

93 90.040 



24.176 

38,363 

19,503 

1,800 

83.842 



9 


3,554 


2 


378 


7 


3.932 



517 


298.946 


498 


290,630 


19 


8,316 


34.860 


33.085.677 


30.511 


28,622,005 


4,349 


4,463,672 



13 '48 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



AGRICULTURE 

Department 

Barrel! B 

Coates Milne D 

De Graff J 

Grieger H 

Kimpinski J 

Masses (2) 

Advances under $500 (44) 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Department 

Advances under $500 (6) 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications 
Commission 

Advances under $500 (2) 

National Film Board 

AdolfeM 

BujoldR 

Bulbulian M 

Cowan P 

DesgagniersG 

Drouin J 

Dussauit A 

DyerG 

Emo B 

Garand J M 

Gifford C G 

Gillson M 

Goodwill J 

GranaS 

Haiven J 

Letarte P 

Macerola F 

Malackct M 

Martin J 

Mondoux R 

Monteith R 

McCarthy J 

McCarthy M J 

McDonalds 

McGrath A 

Penncfather J 

Poulsson A 

ProulxM 

PulgarD 

ShereK 

Spotton J 

Stoddart J 

Studer-Vanel A 

Symansky A 

Taylor M 

TrowS 

Vanel A 

Advances under $500 (69) 

National Museums of Canada 

BedardM 

Cazort M 

Cinq Mars J 

Desjardins J J 

Dunn J 

Homulos P 

Lepage P 

Mahoney A 

McDougall V 

Murphy T 

Pantazzi M 

ProkJ !..'!!'!"! 

Smith B 

Traynor A 

Advances under $500 (9) 



1,110 
797 

1,659 

2,200 
790 

1,511 
10,193 



Public Archives 

Campeau M 

Advance under $500 (1) 



2,000 

45 
2.045 



157,127 



18,260 



1.119 



440 



618 

599 
2,208 
2,055 

851 
1,070 
7,202 

800 
1,052 
2,617 
1,807 
1,333 
18,858 

754 
10,143 

620 

8,048 

10,939 

2,056 

550 
3,026 

691 
3,218 

864 

731 
3,437 
1,419 
9,286 
1,390 

685 

884 

994 
2,088 
1,250 
1,123 
1,033 

893 

8,376 

115.568 

18,500 

500 

1,831 

1,400 

1,056 

3,296 

1. 100 

500 

2,025 

600 

1,200 

1,056 

1,200 

1,900 

1,791 

37.955 



CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS 

Department 

Abt J 

Artken P 

BloorB 

Buchanan JD 

Carriere G 

Chevalier F 

Chiang C 

Drapeau M 

Duncan L 

Emery A 

Erbs A 

Gundy C 

HardieK 

HetuM 

LachanceS 

Leach D 

Lefebvre J 

McDonald J 

McDonald K 

Mason F 

Oliver J 

Perrin R 

Pigeon Y 

Plourde J 

Salysyn M 

Sharon E 

Sim W 

SimardT 

Valliant R 

Advances under $500 (62) 

Restrictive Trade Practices Commission 

Advances under $500 (4) 



EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

Department 

Barber L 

Beaupre F 

Busseri A 

Busseri T 

Carin B 

Debayer A 

Desrochers D (4) 

Dorion M 

Drinnan R 

Dugas J 

■ Fay P B 

Fenn T 

Fitzpatrick J (2) 

Fournier S 

Gionet M 

Gladu G 

Greenman G 

HocggR(2) 

HoeggRM(2) 

Labrie L 

Laflamme C 

Laforest L 

Lamothe J 

MacDonald K 

McGroarty S (2) 

Munro C (2) 

Paquin D (3) 

Paskaruk J 

Pederson R 



1.175 

1,300 

1,800 

800 

1,300 

2,800 

500 

1,900 

1,215 

500 

935 

525 

1,800 

1,800 

1,800 

1,800 

586 

500 

500 

2,000 

800 

520 

1,400 

1,000 

2,790 

1,300 

568 

1,300 

900 

12,315 

48.429 



1.200 



49,629 



862 

1,900 

656 

791 

1,700 

2,000 

993 

1,523 

823 

519 

627 

597 

650 

500 

1,797 

2,072 

1,900 

3,442 

724 

525 

1,300 

1,933 

1,586 

565 

1,300 

532 

696 

2,000 

1,800 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13*49 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



Phillips K 502 

PlourdeG 580 

RenardG 926 

Rcnaud R (2) 1,928 

Roberts M 600 

RodierD(2) 1,521 

Solkow J 600 

Stevenson D 588 

Stromer J 593 

Strong J 1,674 

TurbideG(2) 2,912 

Valentines 565 

Valiquette P (3) 823 

VillencuveG 610 

Wakeman R B (2) 1,131 

Advances under $500 (270) 27,281 



79,147 



ENERGY, MINES AND RESOURCES 

Department 

BcllRT 900 

Broome J 1,000 

Brown A 569 

CurricR 510 

Davidson J 1,000 

DugalJ 2,722 

Fader G 700 

Findlay DC 1,150 

GagneRM 1,666 

HanmerS 800 

Henderson JR 625 

Maurice YT 1,592 

MaxwellJ 4,450 

Moore RE 500 

OlsenD 1,406 

Rencz A 568 

Rogers PJ 1,806 

Smith G 575 

TozerE 3,387 

Walker DA 540 

Wright M 1,000 

YorathC 1,066 

Advances under $500 (46) 7,843 



36,375 



ENVIRONMENT 

Department 

AttficldB 567 

Bailey R 3,331 

BeaulieuB 1,700 

Blaise C 2,000 

BoivinM 700 

BolducG 3,000 

ChartrandR 600 

Davis SP 700 

Duchene M 500 

DupuisR 900 

Elliott R 800 

Fournier G (2) 4,300 

GauthierMF 1,725 

GuyotL 1,000 

Hamilton R 1,500 

Hup6 DC 700 

Jones M 1,950 

KeefeJ 700 

LesageS 650 

McElroyCT 800 

NeateJ 500 

NicmanDJ 668 

Niemela V 1,500 

O'Neill D 850 

PaquetteD 1,752 

PatryM 767 

. Pelletier Y 1,500 



PiirikK 500 

ReidJ 718 

ReitzelS 500 

RothKL 650 

SakaliukR 1.800 

Schuiz M 600 

Shantora V 580 

ThibaultJR 661 

Wardlaw C 500 

Advances under $500 (113^ ■ ■•• • •■••^^ 17.279 



59,448 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

Department 

Abdel Saycd F (3) 3,786 

AbearPT 1,198 

AblettLS 1,265 

Acker EC 4,589 

AdamB 4.524 

Adam G H G 1,637 

AdamM 1,051 

AhrcnsC 1,250 

Akyeampoung G 6,5(X) 

Alary H 900 

Alexander M 2,088 

Alexander R W 7,246 

Amar M 1,000 

Anderson P 1,465 

Anderson PH 2,088 

Anderson R J 2.925 

Andrasi E L 750 

AnstisC J 6.481 

ApollonM 6.175 

Arcand T J 1.515 

Archambauit J M 3,528 

Armstrong D J 2,420 

Arnold J M 3,985 

ArnouldDC 7,575 

Arsenault J 2,661 

Arsenault J F E 5,651 

AshbyJ 2,088 

AsselinJ 4,198 

Attre-SmithJ 1,453 

Audette R S 18,864 

BabinL 2,500 

Bachand Y (2) 2,844 

Bacon T C 22,295 

BadjiO 2,500 

Badley J M 3,499 

BaillargeonC 3,574 

Baillot J 2,863 

Bain A W (2) 12,914 

Baker J L 3,190 

Bale S C (2) 1 1,948 

BarchechatG 1,075 

Barrenger M 684 

Barter G A 1,965 

Baxter D L 9,097 

Beadle R 2,677 

BeaudryG 1.877 

BeaulieuR 539 

BeaupreL 2.250 

BcdardM 1.500 

Behan W P 1,326 

BelairR 500 

Belanger G (2) 5,288 

BclangerJ 2,000 

Belanger M 1.000 

Bell A E H 750 

BellG 1.983 

BcUand J P 2,216 

Bennett W 6,300 

Berangcr J 1.911 

BerubeA 950 

Berubc J P L 1,000 



13*50 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



BercovitzE 12,896 

Bergbusch J 685 

BertletR 1,000 

Best B 2,000 

BhandariM 4,276 

Billion P S (2) 2,772 

BilodeauJ 5,189 

Bishop F L 2,088 

Bissett JB 2,983 

Black E P 793 

Black P 1,000 

BlackmoreRB 3,879 

BlackstockG 2,994 

Blackwell A T 545 

BlakerR 3,000 

BlavatskaL 1,000 

Boehm J T 1,756 

Boehm P M 1,207 

Bogdan A J 2,167 

Boisjoli J 1,690 

BolickM 2,022 

Bones EF 2,741 

Bonhomme J 1,906 

BoodeC 592 

Book A N 667 

Boucher C 1,422 

Boucher R 1,085 

BourgonD 1,135 

Bowes C 667 

Boxer J P 1,010 

Brady S 3,869 

Brady S B P 5,787 

Branion D 536 

BraultR 886 

BrayP 4,930 

Brazeau P 4,354 

Brett W 3,368 

Briand D J G 2,088 

BrindleyP 1,326 

BriscoDW 4,255 

Brittain L 791 

Broadbent J 2,088 

Brockenshire W N 694 

Brooks R J 750 

Brousseau D L 984 

Brown D W 3,423 

Brown S L 6,373 

Browne G G 4,492 

BruneauG 2,678 

Brunct J R 2,088 

Bryson J 702 

BuddD 2,847 

BuUardGM 1,583 

BurchellJ 631 

Bureau L 3,758 

Burianyk Z W (2) 5,076 

Burke K W 10,182 

Burke L 1,326 

Burns R D 3,034 

Burroughs J E 9,904 

BuswellT 500 

Butler D C 6,513 

Butler ERG 2,458 

Butler J L 14,709 

CadieuxG 913 

Cairns G F 793 

Caidato R A 1,626 

Caldwell PB 4,819 

Calvert P J 1,862 

Cameron D 1,000 

Cameron J F 8,430 

Cameron R G 1,600 

Campbell D W 3,563 

Campbell GS 1,248 

Campbell H E 2,088 

Campeau G 2,042 

Cardin J 2,731 



Carisse J J A 1,004 

Carle F 2,916 

Carmichael J H (2) 1,781 

Carpentier M E 3,175 

Carroll R 3,200 

CarruthersJC 13,766 

CatellierR 649 

Cave D G 1,405 

Caverley ME 1.050 

Chamberlain D 2,864 

Chambers P E 1,500 

Chambers W 1,000 

Champagne A 1,500 

Chan H T F 2,800 

CharlandCC 1,568 

ChartrandG 3,500 

ChisholmD 2,719 

ChoquetteL 2,500 

Chouinard J L 5,965 

Christensen E 2,722 

Clapp J B 1,700 

Clark I C 1,120 

Clark L S 8,080 

Clark R G 811 

Clark T G 4,063 

Cleary M J 2,200 

Clendenning D 2,000 

CloutierM 2,088 

CloustonR 1,529 

Cohen D R 9,104 

ColeDR 6,172 

Collacott D 3,410 

CollingeD 1,051 

Collins M 1,739 

ComeauD 7,594 

Cooper J E 4,068 

CordierC 801 

Cormier C 1,559 

CoteL 1,500 

CoteT 4,500 

CoughlinDG 3,387 

CourchaineG 2,006 

Courtney S 3,448 

Couture A R 1.345 

Couturier R 2,995 

Cox B M 2,368 

Craig J G 2,945 

Craig R W 3.490 

Cralocour M 840 

CrevierL 2,088 

Crook D J 4,555 

Cross W A 600 

Croteau-Talbert C 2,273 

Culham A B 6,392 

Cullen R D 1,530 

Cupples C L 13,704 

Curry K R 3,832 

Curry TG 6,370 

CussonPA 26,728 

CuttsJ 1,100 

DaigleR 1,500 

Dale-Harris A 3,900 

Dallaire J J 1,250 

DallaireM 7,371 

Dantzer H A 2,443 

DarechukTL 1,212 

Davidson M A 4,081 

Davis B 886 

Davis C E F 1,962 

DeBaneP 1,200 

DebbaneG 7,000 

DebloisC 2,000 

DelisleA 2,748 

DelisleJP 680 

Delormier L H 3,965 

Delworth W T 569 

Demers J 1,650 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13'51 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



DeroseD 2,088 

Derouin L 500 

DeryR 2,533 

Deschenes J J 2,088 

DcsiletsE 2,100 

Desjardins A 200 

Desjardins A L 934 

Desjardins B 900 

DesjarlaisC 2,700 

Deslauriers D 2,407 

Desloges M H 992 

DesRiviercsG 2,396 

Desroches P 1,266 

DeWolfTC 3,257 

DhavernasD 1,925 

DingledineP 1,628 

Dionnc J Y 7.007 

Dobson L A F 5,068 

DoironR 8,200 

Donohue A 970 

DorcPE 808 

Dorrett R H (2) 4,541 

Doucet P M 715 

Dowswell W H 1,841 

DoyonS 6,476 

Dubois H 2,088 

Dubois? 736 

DudoitA 4,088 

DuchastelP 851 

Duffault J Y T 2,148 

DufTield L J W 2,945 

DufburS(2) 2,615 

DugalL 865 

Duguay G 1,637 

Dumas P 3,311 

Duncan M R 8.049 

Dunseath R 3,675 

DuprasM 800 

^ Duprat R E 1,285 

Dupuis L J R 3,668 

Dupuy M 600 

DurnanN 2,088 

Durning W H 1,368 

Durocher G J 2,387 

Durochcr M G 600 

Duval L 1,989 

Dyker A G 4.384 

EassonM 1,395 

Eastwood W 7.272 

Ehrlich W W 2.500 

Eichen BaumG 2.500 

Elliott J A 2,737 

Ellison W 2,302 

EmardD 2,751 

England C G 1,600 

EnosS 2,000 

EntwistieM 7,265 

Ethier J C 3,784 

EvanoffN 2,500 

Evans RE 1,000 

Everden R H 14,843 

FaguyM(2) 4.620 

Fairweathcr M 1.009 

Fanning i D 8.796 

Farrington M 549 

Fasting I 603 

FauteuxP 914 

Feldman W 2.718 

Ferguson J 2.013 

Ferriil R A (2) 1.855 

FilearK 1,630 

FiliplouE 2,500 

! Fontaine C 2.415 

FordM 1,652 

ForguesC 3.630 

Forrest C 834 

FbrtinG 1.500 



Foster C 1.432 

Foster D 4.500 

Foster D P 721 

Fournier A 6,164 

Fournier R B 1,350 

Fowell J R D 3,907 

FoxS 2,418 

Francomb M J 2,645 

Fraser H P G 4.470 

Fraser J M 667 

Fraser M 669 

Fritz N 550 

FulfbrdD 5,247 

FureszP 1.542 

GagnonH 951 

Gagnon J 510 

Gagnon Y 1,500 

Galarneau F 2,854 

Galpin A J 2,000 

Ganderton J J 600 

Gardner A 1,850 

Gardner J D 3.500 

Garrard C E 844 

Gascon M 15,808 

Gauthier J J 2,088 

Gauvin A : 2,545 

George D 2,953 

Gervais D 500 

GervaisM 1.091 

Ghent J M 1.445 

Gherson A R A 2,308 

Gibbons S G 4,591 

Gibson B 1,128 

Gibson J E G 5.819 

GignacJ 1,193 

Gilchrist DM 2,967 

Gilker E E 3,238 

GillD 1,000 

Gillett D E 5,508 

Gillette A L 1.191 

Gillette S R 1.700 

GirardA 750 

GobanS 1,000 

Gombay J P 1,583 

Gondosaputro E 1.019 

Gonizzi A 2.770 

Goodman R D 1.500 

Gordons 868 

GoreskyD 10.126 

GormclyJ 750 

GossageP 1,231 

GosselinL 6.078 

Gosselin P J 7,466 

GourlayRB 3,000 

GowDG 5.460 

Graham A L 3.303 

Graham B 600 

Graham W D 14,083 

Granger P 1,089 

GrattonG 1,350 

GrattonL 3,000 

GraveiJ 2,088 

Graves B 650 

Greatrix L A 1.043 

Green A W 1.407 

Green G N 2.125 

Green M C 4,403 

Gregoire de Blois D 1,342 

Grice G W 2.778 

GroddeE 3.892 

Grummett D 250 

GuayL 12,067 

Gugliere M J 2,500 

GushulakB 1,510 

Hadwcn J G 1,000 

Hahn P L K 660 

Haley A 4,188 



13 '52 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



HalpinRR 1.500 

HamblinM 563 

Hamlin D L B 1.106 

HammanB A 1.127 

Hammond W 1,283 

Hanafi W A 6,831 

HandforthR 775 

Hankey B G 1.309 

Hann P D 4,327 

Hansen C K 500 

Happy G 600 

Hare E N 2,498 

HarknessR 2,500 

Harman J J 5,000 

Harper M 2,595 

Harpers 2.059 

Harris HA 1.800 

Hart R J 8.314 

HartmanC 1.942 

HarwoodR 2,088 

HellmanJ 1.022 

HelmkeC 697 

Hendrick M A 7,260 

HenkeeK 2,955 

Henneberry L P 1.013 

HentschelJ 10,537 

Herman B 551 

Herran-Lima J J 3,628 

Hetherington W 4,500 

HeuckrothLE 6,868 

Hewlett- Jobes K 2,295 

Hill AM 2,648 

Hill D R 2,599 

HinsonS 958 

Hinton G N 6,660 

HladikMJ 5,836 

Hodge W D 1,293 

Hoganson M J 528 

Holbrook D J 12,400 

Hood B P 930 

Hope R J 2,864 

Hopton R I 2,426 

Hornby E W 694 

Hornby R 2,088 

HosleyKC 1,500 

HouldenG 4,429 

Howell S 2,773 

Howse R L 2,000 

HuddlcstonP 6,401 

HudelotD 2,000 

HudonG 2,065 

Hughes D S 6,929 

Hughes G 2,598 

Hughes R C 2,1 16 

Hunter V 5,366 

Hurst J P 1,460 

HutchinsAR 1,256 

Isaac H 5,179 

Jackman F T 1,584 

Jackson C 4,047 

Jackson R 1,059 

Jacques D 1,158 

JalbertOP 538 

James L A K 12,376 

James W W 2,036 

Jamieson D 603 

Jamieson DC 4,332 

JanischM 2,088 

JayM 3,162 

Jayaweera C 687 

JeanD 3,482 

Jenkins WT 688 

Jensen D C 2,120 

Jensen K P 1,580 

Jimmo E 972 

Johnson A M B 2,666 

Johnston E R 918 



Amount 



Johnston K R 1,666 

Johnston W W 1,149 

Johnstone R 1,024 

JolyJC 1,138 

JolyM 2,684 

Jones M D 2,914 

Jones T S E 59 

Jones Y M 535 

JonkJ 756 

Junke J A 3,050 

Jurschewsky S H 946 

Kaiser R G 1,168 

Karsgaard D 2,644 

Kawecki BC 3,259 

KazaksJ 1,392 

KeithlinD 11,020 

Kclley K P 2,088 

Kennedy K B 1,796 

Kepper J E 708 

KcyukJ 2,800 

Keys G T 3,150 

Keys H E 4,250 

Kinsman K B (2) 1,836 

Kinsman W C 2,728 

KirschP 1,600 

Kirschberg N 4,765 

Kneubuhler N 663 

KnockaertD 3,350 

Koch F H 8,609 

Kocnig E H (2) 5,260 

KolataczH 5,886 

KolterS 3,188 

KoopR 4,474 

Korn H G 2,088 

KorthD 3,181 

KotykE 1,317 

KovacsE 4,053 

Laberge J 6,813 

LablackN 2,500 

Labrecque A 10,438 

LacombcD 1,067 

Ladouceur D 3,226 

Lafantaisie P 613 

LafbrtuneH 2,871 

LafbrtuneR 1,934 

LahaieM 14,742 

LaheyD 2,144 

LalandeR 3,000 

Lamoureux L 4,306 

Landry M 3,000 

LaneR 4,000 

Langille G W 2,725 

LapointeCJ 5,000 

Lapointe P A 4,487 

Lapointe R E 2,000 

LarkinD 843 

LarocheNT 5,050 

Larose J 975 

LaroseD 1.326 

Lasowski E 2,051 

LaverdureC 2,758 

Lavergne M 2,212 

LavoieBJ 1.000 

Lavoie-Abate M 2,882 

LebarsG(2) 9,736 

LeblancL 1.000 

LebouillierR 1.800 

LeePD 706 

Legare J 1.126 

LegerB 3,000 

LegerL 1.549 

LemaireG 833 

LemayGT 1.943 

Lessard G 1,385 

LetendreR 2,000 

Letourneau D 2,088 

LetourneauG 901 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13*53 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



LevasseurS 1,909 

Lever A 1.732 

Levesquc J 500 

Licharson J 8,152 

Livingston F G 3,541 

LjungarK 1,028 

Loader G 1,611 

Lobsinger J P 7,650 

Loignon F X E 3,264 

LongtinR 2,046 

LortieM 1,738 

LosierD 8,784 

Lowrey P 641 

Lucy R V 1,107 

Luhowy A 1,629 

Lygo D A 2,708 

Lynch JO 2,888 

MacArthurPJ 3,088 

MacDonald I 1,500 

Maclnnis J R 7,670 

MackB 772 

MacKay D R 2,168 

MacKayJ 600 

MacKay L R 3,938 

MacKinnon K W 12,859 

MacLellan K W 1,207 

MacMillanC 1,500 

MacquarrieG 1,697 

Magny J P 1,335 

MagunS 800 

Maki ML 2,143 

Makin J A 2,668 

Maiepart J C 750 

Malikail P M 1,772 

Malone D M 658 

Mandcl A 756 

Mann D V 7,796 

MarceauR 2,500 

Marchand D G 1,71 1 

Marcil J C N 1,477 

MariniJ 4,591 

Mark F J 1,957 

Markham C N 3,000 

MartelD 4,557 

MartelL 643 

Martins 750 

Martin T J 1,205 

Mason R P W 20,122 

Masse Hon M 1,000 

Massey J M 1,851 

Massicotte A 1,467 

MathieuG 2,640 

Maybee W M 2,402 

Mayne A H 2,096 

Mazzolani F 619 

McAldenS 1,297 

McCallionK 2,088 

McCann J J 6,134 

McCleaveP 1,500 

McCracken D (2) 5,588 

McDonald D G 3,000 

McDonald D R 2,400 

McDonald G 2,088 

McDougall R P 1,641 

McEachern W 1,402 

McGee T D 1,326 

McGillivray D W 3,801 

McGovernP 820 

McGrath M B 3,116 

McGregor R K 3,240 

McIntyreG 2,100 

McKeownL 1,396 

McKinney J R 2,027 

McKinnon R J 2,088 

McLaine A P 9,633 

McLaughlin F E 1,418 



McLaughlin M M 

McLean W 

McMillan H 

McMurtry R 

McNeish J G T 

McPhailDS(2) 

McQueen G 

McRac RG 

Mechan M J 

Meier 1 

Melanson J P 

MelisCM 

MellorB 

MelnS 

Mercer J C 

Merifield R 

Merklinger K 

Mikkelborg E 

MiietteCR 

Miller BR 

MilletteC 

Millons J 

MiloWG 

Minnery A 

Minz A 

Mitra M 

Moffatt J F 

Molloy M J 

Montpetit J 

Mooney T L 

Morden J R 

Morgan H R 

Morin F 

Morin M L 

Morissette L 

Morrill K 

Morrisson 1 

Morrisson W 

Motta J B 

MuliinS 

Mundell I 

MusgroveG H 

Muszynski K 

Mysak D 

Nadeau F 

Nahwegahbow D 

Namiesinowski C 

Nana O 

Nickerson W T 

Norman D L 

Norris T A 

Northgrave B (2) 

Nowlan D 

NuttJS 

Nutty DH 

Nykiforuk G 

O'Connor B 

Ogaick G J 

Ohyama H 

Oldham PA 

O'Malley A 

O'Malley J 

O'Meara M 

O'NeilH B 

Oppertshausser M A , 

OrrRJ 

OxlcyP 

Palmer PL 

Palmer R 

Paquette J 

Park A E 

Park J S 

Parker A E 

Parks ET 

Pascal A 

Paterson M E 



2.268 
1,600 
4.058 
2.088 
4,092 
2,379 
1,395 
5,800 
8,478 
2,088 
7,860 
3,350 
2,970 
2.300 
3,800 
2.984 

975 
1.200 
8.956 
9.342 
2.981 
6.100 

500 
1,351 
4,732 
2,593 
1,304 

564 
1,289 

994 

556 
1,917 
2.216 
3.375 

900 

621 
2,100 
1,566 
2,927 
1,857 
3,500 
8.285 

944 
3.374 
1.545 

500 

926 
2,500 
6.998 

922 
3,892 
1,277 

600 
2,088 
2,721 
1,500 
5,662 
0,103 
1,254 
6,651 
1,326 
1,968 
1,221 
7.630 
8,694 

638 
2,379 
2,088 
9,767 
6,549 
2,688 
2,411 

600 
5,308 

647 
3,921 



13-54 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



PatteeS 4,611 

Payne J H 2,804 

Paynter J 687 

Pearson L 1,713 

Pelletier L (2) 8,743 

PenetN 1,321 

Perez G M 673 

Perini J 673 

PerraultB 685 

PerraultR 750 

Peters K 7,975 

Pflanz B T (2) 13,276 

PiatelliM 1,198 

PichetteP 9,641 

Plowman RK 2,130 

Poetscheke R W 1,588 

Poirier D W 13,843 

Pomerleau R A 1,106 

Poole A S 2,164 

Potvin A 4,000 

Pound W H 500 

Power NEC 1,857 

Powles J M 3,000 

Preece D G 5,310 

Prevost J G 10,091 

Pritchard J R 2,955 

Pursey F G W 1,561 

QuanD 540 

Quinn MA 794 

RacicotP 2,144 

Racine A 1,551 

RainvilleC 2,052 

Rathewell W S 965 

Rayburn A F 8,445 

Reach N E 1,800 

Reece D C 795 

ReederN 1,620 

Reid JM 623 

RenaudM 1,936 

Renaud R J P 1 1,155 

Reshitnyk M J 2,000 

RezekG 2,550 

Ricard A 2,588 

Richard F 1,979 

Richardson M 1,400 

Richens G T 6,072 

RickmanH 6,860 

Roberts PM 7,548 

Roberts W G 1,293 

Robertson P 5,725 

RobichaudG 2,324 

RobichaudM 2,588 

RobillardA 5,370 

Robinson A M 3,074 

Robinson A N 1,333 

Robinson W R 2,743 

RoblinD 2,105 

RochS 1,503 

Rockburne C A 769 

Rodriguez C 2,361 

Rodriguez E J 2,088 

Rogers D 3,000 

Rolston W D 2,172 

Romano R E 3,144 

RomoffM 564 

Rose J 2,282 

RosenesB 4,788 

Rosenfeld I W 5,000 

RosilainenR 2,500 

Ross C W 16,676 

RoucP 7,859 

Rousseau COR 1,212 

RousselM 2,861 

RoyC 2,402 

RoyG 1,853 

Roy J 1,044 

Roy J A 644 



RoyRJ 1,562 

RuffoA 1,395 

RungruangN 2,500 

Rush G B 1,911 

Russel C S 6,280 

Rutherford R 846 

Ryan D G 2,434 

Ryan D J 1,125 

RyanTM 3,067 

Saint Georges M 2,368 

Saint Hilaire Y 2,000 

SalesseG 592 

SallcryR 1,589 

SalvaniN 2,588 

Samuel M K 594 

Saumier-Finch S 1,285 

Saunders DR 2,554 

Saunders P 556 

SauveJ J 1,500 

Schioler J 2,088 

Schneider J 1,198 

SchwartsM 1,599 

Scott BF 2,564 

Scott R T 5,498 

Scown D R 12,1 12 

Scvigny A P 2,000 

Shannon G 5,959 

Shannon J P (2) 5,626 

ShawDH 6,500 

Sheng W B 1,500 

ShenstoneM 439 

Sheppit W 1,126 

SherrinMC 952 

Sherwood W 500 

Sheward L M 931 

ShottG 4,124 

SicardG 2,300 

Siggrist J M 525 

Silvcrstone J 1,107 

Simard AS 700 

SimardR 730 

Sims J 1,100 

SinasacR 10,416 

Sinclair M 976 

Singlenton H 3,400 

Sipos A 550 

SiroisC 500 

Sirrs R D 1,143 

Sloan J 7,489 

Small M 2,000 

Small R M 4.588 

Smith D R L 3,135 

Smith E 3,000 

Smith ET 1,480 

Smith G B 849 

Smith P M 845 

Smith RT 1,285 

Smith V 895 

Smith W 2,000 

SnowF 4,300 

SosiakD 869 

Sotvedt J S 1,699 

Soucy M 508 

Spencer M C 683 

SpeyerC 655 

Spiess D L 15,512 

Springgay B 3,264 

Stansfield R C 2,682 

Sterling H S 7,332 

Stevenson E 1,847 

Stewart A J 692 

StinsonMG 3,298 

Storms T 3,348 

StroutsH 684 

Summers D G 2,189 

Sundays 756 

Sutherland A 1.348 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13*55 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



Sutton R A 1,844 

Szalay 1 2,641 

TaillonB 6,500 

TamN 85 

Tamai Y 3,740 

Tanguay J F 1,495 

Taschcrcau F 2,952 

Tardif JG 10.287 

Tardif JG 1,634 

TashoK 2,600 

Taylor D E F 1,046 

Taylor J H (2) 1 1,087 

Taylor J L 2,843 

Taylor M 2,937 

Taylor R 1,800 

Taylor V 1,828 

Temple M 554 

Tessier R J M 6,172 

Thaipbasithiporio K T 2,967 

TheoretS 803 

ThibaultP 4,029 

Thibodeau M 3,000 

Thivierge R 766 

Thomas J MT(2) 11,130 

Thomas P D 4,554 

Thomson P 1,151 

Thomson P G 1,504 

Thorpe D 3,522 

Tiessen O H 1,361 

Titsworth J 2,838 

Tittley J G 2,570 

Tomick A S 2,006 

Touchette J 928 

TovceC 2,188 

TreleavenJH 3,279 

Tremblay C M 6,113 

TremblayG 1,887 

Tremblay M 750 

Trowbridge J 2,300 

Turcotte R F 966 

Turcotte Y 1,416 

Turner C 1,500 

Turner DR 9,873 

Turner DR 4,343 

Turqui A 2,680 

Tyo A 2,1 13 

Tyrrell K 2,000 

UlrichG 2,838 

UnruhD 2,100 

VachonG 3,534 

ValjakkaK 1,779 

Van der Barren J 3,927 

Van Staalduinen W J 1,200 

VanderlooR 1,350 

Vary A 988 

Vasarajs V 2,695 

Vazquez G 1,000 

VermetteM J 2,632 

VersteeghJ A 1,585 

Vezarro L 778 

Vezina F J L (2) 2,977 

ViUamizarl 697 

VilleneuveG 1,000 

Villeneuve G EG 2,088 

Villeneuve N J L (4) 5,790 

VinerDG 10,055 

Von Finckenstein O 2,854 

Von Herbing J 6,741 

WadeLD 3,180 

Walsh M H 538 

Walsh P W 2,088 

WaplingtonKS 3,258 

Warden W T 2,315 

Wardroper W K 1,703 

Waters C 700 

Watson K R 2,642 



Wcatherall D R F 

Weaymouth B R 

Webster P 

Wcinstein T S 

Welsh J D 

Welsh M C 

WelckerY 

Westdal C W 

WhelanP 

WhitcombE 

Whitehead G E 

Whitney DW 

Williams T A 

•Willis LA 

WilloxP 

Wilson C 

Wilson E C 

Wilson G J 

Winfield D J S 

Wodinsky M S 

Wood F I (2) 

Wood G W 

Wood J C 

Woods M 

Wright G 

Yamada E 

Yaosaki M 

Yetman E M 

Yeung B W H 

Young W 

ZaliteP 

Zechner F W 

Zimmerman R 

Advances under $500 (933) 

3. 

Canadian International Development Agency 

Beaulieu J R 

Foster A 

Froment J L 

Gouault M 

Harrington J 

Joly Y 

Kramer J 

Lessard M 

Lessard R 

Lewandowski W 

Maione R 

Maisonneuve L M 

Morrow R 

Perera R 

Perinbam L 

Perlin J 

Racicot P 

Ram S E 

Rolston W 

RossS 

Ruszkowski J P 

Advances under $500 (27) 



1.693 
7.500 
1.192 
1.848 
4.650 
4.108 
1.646 

11.011 
1,866 
687 
2.944 
2.104 
5.748 
1.198 
515 
2.000 
7.190 
2.001 
1,658 
5,575 

19,900 
2.088 
2.43S 
1.927 
2.100 
2.600 
2.500 

14.277 
3.061 
3,014 
1.306 
2.000 
1.250 
265.028 
116,201 



1.800 

2.083 

3.200 

615 

1.600 

3,000 

525 

900 

4.406 

1.000 

9.663 

1.833 

2.008 

3.273 

800 

2.077 

2.500 

500 

654 

2.783 

1.257 

4.809 

51.286 



3,167,487 



FINANCE 

Department 

GilfixD 

Stephens M 

Advances under $500 (89) 

Auditor General 

Thompson R (2) 

Insurance 

Fletcher WH 

Forster S K R (2) 



1.407 

1,000 

30,153 

32.560 



1.470 



1.000 
1,900 



13*56 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Kaminsky G J 
Proctor WW. 

Rowe R W 

Scalena A J ... 
Sharrow G A . 
Takatsu T 



FISHERIES AND OCEANS 

Department 

Hubcr B 

Legarff J 

Newton B 

Wesley R 

Advances under $500 (33) ... 



INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT 

Department 

Ash-Poitras J 

Beauchamp D 

Catherall L 

Coon T 

Dick A 

Dodge J 

Lawson J 

NyceC 

PaezJ{2) 

Steritt N 

Advances under $500 (43) 



JUSTICE 

Department 

Belanger C 

Brault Krzan M 

Brown A 

ColinC 

Flaherty R J (2) 

Gervais M (3) 

Kornichuk L 

KrivelEF(2) 

Malboeuf J 

Robert P 

Thomson J B (2) 

Advances under $500 (71) 

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 

Ayles L 

Boisvert G 

Bolan M 

Bowlby J 

Cory P 

Daigle J 

Deschene A 

Desmarais R 

Esson W 

Ficury J 

Forget J 

Godin J 

Gratton F 

Kennedy D 

Lafreniere R 

MacDonald F J 

McLaclin B 

Perras P 

Perras R 

Scott J 

Sirois J A 

Soublifere H 



$ 

1,100 
1,500 

750 
1,100 

850 
1,500 
9.700 



43,730 



3,500 
500 
802 
901 

3,868 



9,571 



638 

600 

500 

1,400 

500 

540 

511 

511 

550 

3,000 

7,306 



16,056 



6,611 
500 

1,472 
500 

2,364 

1,050 

1,233 
520 
500 

1,682 
795 

9,038 
26.265 



580 
580 
580 
930 
380 
630 
580 
580 

2,130 
440 
380 
580 
450 

1,330 
800 
930 

2,130 
380 
580 
380 
730 
280 



Trainer R 

VeitJ 

Wright D 

Tax Court of Canada 

Advance under $500 ( 1 ) 



LABOUR 

Department 

Aykroyd C 

Daniels M 

HallD 

KirkB 

Langille F 

Robichaud J 

Rousseau P 

Smith V G 

Advances under $500 (9) 

Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety 

Dialog Information Services Inc 

Services Development Corporation (Information Services) 
Advances under $500 (4) 



NATIONAL REVENUE 

Customs and Excise 

Cardinal R E 

Guimond R A 

King J 

Parisien Wm R 

Advances under $500 (21) 

Taxation 

Allen R 

Association for Information and Image Management . 

Barbieri C 

BargT 

BartlettG 

Basaliusz W 

BedardP 

Belcourt FC 

Bennett M 

Bisson C (2) 

Bouchard G 



Amount 



930 

1,280 

1,530 

20.100 



300 



46,665 



2,800 

1,500 

800 

4,500 

500 

542 

1,000 

1,100 

1,539 

14.281 



8,931 

584 

763 

10.278 





24.559 


NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Department 

Allen G 


500 


Arnold D L 


500 


Baines K 


600 


BillendukeM 


500 


Brown B 


500 


D'Aeth R 


750 


Enzo A 


500 


Hennebery T 


500 


Manuluk S 


500 


Monette D 


500 


Onaluk J 


500 


Palagian G 


500 


Putaluk L 


500 




500 


Vanerhart A 


500 


Woods L 


729 


Advances under $500 (32) 


8,683 








17,262 



500 
1,000 

600 
1,400 
3,206 
6.706 



975 
723 

1,855 
547 
816 
500 

1,709 
500 

1,630 

1,699 
500 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13 '57 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



BouthillierR 

BrattG 

Browne C A 

BuhrC 

Bulger P 

Burton W 

CaliGE 

CaltonR 

Campbell G (3) 

Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants 

Chapados J Y 

ChoquetteS 

Darson S 

Date Processing Management Association 

Day M 

Delorme L 

DhillonH 

Dion A 

DufourR 

Dunphy A 

Dupuis N 

Entrepot Regional Inc 

Fan A 

Fernet J (3) 

FinnaG 

Finter Canada Corporation 

Fraser J P 

FungS 

Glover S 

Gold A 

Green D C (2) 

Grodecki R 

GunnR 

Hamilton R M C 

Handrigan D 

Harding K 

HooftE 

Jacques L 

Johnson E 

Johnson G 

Jolicocur G 

Kimball D 

Koomar E 

Kuet LeongP 

Labonte M 

Lafleche P 

Lafontaine M 

LajoieG 

Landry L 

Lauzon R (2) 

Leach G 

LeeD 

LeePoy D 

Legedza C 

Legree D 

LemcovitzS 

MacDougall L (2) 

Maclnnis M 

Madden E 

Maharaj F 

Manning J 

Marcouiller D 

Martin D 

Masse S 

Maxwell H 

McKenna L 

Meloche R 

Minister of Finance — B C 

Minister of Finance — Quebec (22) 

Morrison J 

Mosher AR 

Mounif E (2) 

NaylorR 

Nelson A 

Opheim H 

Osmond RC 

Pepin M 



500 

1,901 

1,000 

1,630 

700 

800 

1,828 

2,192 

870 

550 

650 

525 

500 

550 

500 

563 

2,403 

500 

700 

800 

1,400 

500 

840 

2,100 

1,950 

700 

775 

1,110 

690 

3,260 

7,750 

725 

736 

2,274 

790 

640 

1,150 

540 

800 

1,879 

700 

1,700 

573 

700 

700 

500 

563 

500 

1,000 

1,307 

500 

600 

1,961 

2,200 

733 

500 

850 

520 

800 

1,560 

600 

501 

1,270 

750 

653 

650 

900 

11,260 

8,250 

1,630 

1,900 

600 

543 

3,525 

1,000 

1,264 

1,168 



PittW 

PlourdeR 

PostelnikC 

RedfordL 

ReidJ 

Rice A 

Saenz S (2) 

Saltsman M 

Salvati A 

SchulzH 

Shepherd J 

Shepherd J A 

Sheriff de Beauce 

Sheriff de Chicoutimi 

Sheriff de Gaspe 

Sheriff de Mingan 

Sheriff de Quebec 

Sheriff de Saguenay 

Sheriff de Sept-Iles 

Sheriff — District of Cochrane 

Sheriff of Hull (5) 

Sheriff of the Judicial District of Halton 

Sheriff of the Judicial District of Hamilton — Wentworth 

Shields A 

Siconolfl Furfaro K 

Skinner W 

Stewart C 

Suter R (2) 

Toohey R 

Treasurer Ont — York 

Troke J 

Turcotte D 

121204 Canada Inc 

Viebig A 

Vivian HW 

WatkinsK 

Williamson M (2) 

Zannis H 

Advances under $500 (122) 



PRIVY COUNCIL 



Department 

Advances under $500 (2) 



Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat 

Advances under $500 (2) 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Department 

Beaudet R 

Gonthier BA 

Hardy G 

Johnson JR (3) 

Johnston CA (2) 

Parsons J 

Power WK (14) 

Rowe F 

Ruppert U 

Vrooman J 

WeskoG 

Advances under $500 (41) 



REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION 

Department 

Beaton TL (3) 

Bergeron M 

BondD 

Braithwaite R 



744 
860 
700 

1.243 
675 

1.630 

1.400 
700 
700 

1.873 
11.000 
830 
700 
700 
700 
700 

1.200 
SOO 
700 
610 

2.100 
SOO 
500 

1.000 
500 
625 

1.630 

1.400 
700 

2.527 
800 
847 
700 
700 
600 

1.040 

2.110 

500 

31,453 

195.073 



201,779 



500 

107 



607 



1.046 

780 
1.688 

668 
3.620 

800 
2.571 

600 
1.500 
1.188 

500 
S.88S 



20.846 



1.808 

4.114 

800 

1.000 



13*58 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



Bieman MJ 722 

Brousseau J 750 

Brown S 750 

Campbell BF (3) 789 

Carter W (2) 600 

Cooper A 500 

CoteG 1,700 

dc Leeuw AJ 644 

Delvecchio RA (2) 800 

DemersD 900 

Evershed P 7,741 

Field RH (2) 2,925 

Foley H (2) 1,231 

Fontaine P (3) 650 

Gadbois IP (2) 1,505 

Garceau A 1,419 

Gillespie R 1,827 

Graham A (2) 2,455 

Graham W 1,439 

Green G 1,600 

Green M 600 

HamernickR 2,300 

HaydonPR 675 

Heeney R 8,500 

HolidV(2) 7,120 

HouIahanJ 1,659 

JalaludinM 895 

Korcheski B 700 

Lalonde P O 4,000 

LaughtonC 829 

LennonP 1,500 

MacKay W E 2.027 

McCulla D J(2) 976 

McGee H R 2,810 

McGregor G A 2,347 

McIlroyL(2) 7,500 

McKelveySJ 1,562 

Marcoux B 2,000 

MarrsI 1,000 

Mathu J (2) 2,610 

Murray C 750 

NoeIR 1,800 

Oakley B 850 

O'CallaghanD 500 

Oliver J C 900 

Paradis M J 820 

PatonB 2,119 

PelisekJ 892 

Peplinski D M 2.938 

PersaudR 1,677 

Pierre FC 900 

Podruzny D F (3) 3,083 

PrunerC 1,038 

Racine D 700 

ReidS 1,237 

RookeJR 742 

Rosborough J A 1,000 

RothwellJ 2,500 

Sampson C P 4,000 

Serveau J E 744 

Shortt R 800 

StedmanC 1,500 

Sweet L V (2) 870 

Szymanowski J 3,500 

Torrington F 1,200 

Treble D W 600 

Triantafilopoulos E (2) 7,300 

Trottier J 2,502 

Van Nes R 2,000 

Van Zant J W (2) 1,263 

Vanderven K 2,500 

Walker B (2) 1,030 

Walker H (2) 1,200 

Watters R P 1,723 

WiebeJ 900 

Wilkens J (3) 1,647 



WoodsR 

Young H 

Advances under $500 (115) 

Foreign Investment Review Agency 

WinfieldD 



SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Ministry of State 

Advances under $500 (3) 

National Research Council of Canada 

Godfrey L 

Goodrich E 

Jerome R 

Kornelsen E V 

SinhaNK 

Advances under $500 (9) 



SECRETARY OF STATE 

Department 

Dadson A 

DurdinT(2) 

Lamontagne P (2) 

Paganuzzi V 

Saharov I 

Taylor D 

Advances under $500 (38) 

Public Service Commission 

Acoca H 

Bleakney J 

Cahill W 

Carignan D 

ChadlerE 

Cloutier R 

ColeG 

Demers D R 

Fahmy A 

Frederick W 

GaleMD 

GraberK 

Joasnsoon T M 

Johnston P 

Kingham L A 

Label MT 

Leblanc R A 

Lefebvre L 

Lewis K 

Maidens WH 

Michaud M 

MoggeridgeC 

MonfilsG 

Philip W 

Pigeon J 

Shilton J 

St-Arnaud D 

Sutton M 

Thivierge J P 

Todesco A 

Watson B 

Advances under $500 (50) 



2,250 

2,000 

23,897 

178.151 



713 



178,864 



480 



1,092 
2,000 

500 
1,681 

500 
1,210 
6.983 



7,463 



903 

1.372 
2,732 
3,375 
3,500 
999 
4,458 
17.339 



,365 
,813 
950 
,072 
500 
,200 
,165 
,000 
650 
,517 
800 
741 
,582 
525 
900 
,685 
,000 
500 
,206 
,000 
,536 
800 
931 
,652 
,000 
,186 
,002 
750 
500 
665 
,000 
060 
.253 



78,592 



SVPPLEMENTARY INFORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 
Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Continued 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Continued 



13 '59 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



SOLICITOR GENERAL 

Department 

Bujould B 

BullerEO) 

Charles C (2) 

Charron J 

Clark M 

Constantineau E 

Davey O 

Evans J 

Ferguson S (2) 

Gravel-Dunberry O 

Jeffries F 

Kelly P 

Kirvan M 

Kuash V 

LabelleR 

Lam J 

Lloyd S 

MacDonaldDT 

MacDonald K 

MacFarlane L 

MacLaren A 

Mclsaac E 

McKay E 

McManus K (2) 

McMullinC 

Molloy A 

Paquet G 

Sarides G 

Simon P 

Smith A 

Stewart D 

StoteD(2) 

VailH 

Wood J 

Zelman M 

Advances under $500 (31). 

Correctional Service 

Atherton K 

Aubin E 

Brown N L 

Corriveau D 

Donnelly P 

Issac B 

Kenny M 

Mahoney B E C 

Marsland M 

McMahn J 

Reynolds N 

Ryan M 

Smiths 

Twyman P 

Zawislak B 

Advances under SSOO (76) 

National Parole Board 

Charbonneau M 

Advances under $500 (4) .. 



SUPPLY AND SERVICES 

Department (Supply Program) 

Archambault A 

BoydBT 

Carisse C 

Castellino M 

Connor D L 



500 

1.090 
875 

2.500 
500 
800 
593 

1.500 
900 
500 
800 
500 
500 

1.180 
500 
500 
650 
500 
500 
600 

2,600 
300 

2.000 

1.025 
600 
600 

2,000 
500 
500 
500 
500 
900 
600 
500 

2.800 

6.921 
38.834 

500 
500 

1.239 
500 

1.200 

1,500 
705 
535 

1.200 
SOD 
517 
500 
800 

1.000 

750 

11.063 

23.009 



1.828 

404 

2.232 



64.075 



900 

800 

2.500 

2.500 

10.000 



Ceulombe L 

DaoutO 

Dunken H 

GagneMF(2) 

Gaualeuiz W , 

Guy R 

Hamed E 

Hammonds J 

HopeD 

Irish E 

Ironside R 

JackT 

Kreker H 

Lewis S 

Martin H 

McDougall D 

McLean B 

McRay D 

Piatt N 

RichardC 

Trickctt R (2) 

Advances under $500 (64) 

Statistics Canada 

Advance under $500 (1) .... 



TRANSPORT 

Department 

Begin L 

Broadfoot M D 

CapalboL(2) 

Cohan P 

Desorcy C 

FordN 

Husband R 

Lamsa P 

Lanceley T 

Marshall J 

McRaeTA 

Pearson J 

Raits R 

Advances under $500 (49) 

Canadian Aviation Safety Board 

Allinson A (2) 

Batchelor C M 

Borden DE (2) 

Breton R 

Burton J D 

Carrier R 

Charette A 

Clark A (3) 

Cooke GS 

De Niverville P 

Doucet P 

Dupasquier P B 

DzusS 

Enns D R 

Fernandez M 

Gosselin Y 

Graham M 

Hibberd K 

HintonTP 

Johnson C A 

Johnson K A 

Jones R 

Kelly T 

Kosmider K 

Lemire S (2) 



2.000 
1.000 
5.750 

650 
2.500 
4.000 
4.000 

500 

500 
8.000 
3.000 

500 
2.000 
6.800 
8.500 
5,000 

500 
2.200 
2.000 

500 

1.500 

11,690 

89.790 



250 



90,040 



1.300 
500 
760 
790 
600 

4,000 
728 

4.000 
850 
800 
800 

2,000 
550 

6.498 
24.176 



2.500 
500 

1,800 
500 
500 
500 
500 

2,584 
500 
750 
500 
500 
600 
500 
500 
500 

1.500 
500 
500 
500 
600 
500 
579 
600 

2,500 



13*60 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Accountable advances not repaid, accounted for or recovered — Concluded 
Details of accountable advances outstanding as at April 30, 1985 — Concluded 



Name 



Amount 



Name 



Amount 



Lung D 

MacMillanHD 

MacSwain W G 

Maillard J 

MilordG 

Musson S 

Phillips R A 

RahnWJH 

Rennie D M 

Saul G A 

Storey T 

Stratton BK 

Van Keulen H 

Veevers J 

Advances under $500 (27) 



Canadian Transport Commission 

Gowan C E 

Kelso B 

Macangus J 

PostK 

SeraHn J M 

Stanley C 

Thompson J D 

Wetston H 

Advances under $500 (5) 



600 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

2,500 
550 
500 
500 
600 
500 
500 
600 

7,500 
38,363 



500 

2,800 

5,000 

2,400 

500 

500 

6,500 

717 

586 

19.503 



Nortliern Pipeline Agency 

CalliouG 

Gautier A 

Hannan J 

Summer E 



300 
500 
500 
500 

1,800 



83,842 



TREASURY BOARD 

Secretariat 

Advances under $500 (9) 3,554 

Comptroller General 

Advances under $500 (2) 378 

3,932 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

CarriSreC 500 

Craig N 639 

DcBellefeuille R (7) 3,300 

Lazar F 1,500 

Nurse M 500 

Wendt M 1,000 

Advances under $500 (7) 877 

8,316 

Grand total 4,463,672 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT 
Statement of all borrowing transactions on behalf of Her Majesty 



13'61 



Note: this information is required by Section 40 of the Financial Administration Act. The borrowing transactions included in this 
statement are: borrowings by the Government for general purposes, and borrowings by agent Crown corporations which are 
reported as such on the Government's Statement of Assets and Liabilities, except where the Government is the lender. 
Borrowings by non-agent Crown corporations are not included because such borrowings are not on behalf of Her Majesty. 

(in millions of dollars) 



April 1/1984 



Unmatured debt of the Government of Canada^') 

Borrowings of Crown corporations designated as agents of Her Majesty^^) . 

Total 

(" Details can be found in Section 1 1 of this volume. 

'^' Details can be found in Section 7 (Table 7.4) of this volume. 



142.637 
10.763 



153,400 



Issues/ 
Borrowings 



Retirements 



175.615 
36,402 



212,017 



145,820 
34.301 



180,121 



March 31/1985 



172.432 
12.864 



185.296 



Losses of money or public property 

Note: this information is required by Section 91.1 of the Financial Administration Act. 

Losses of money due to fraud or willful misrepresentation (by other than a public officer) in 1984-85 



Incident 



Number of 
incidents 



Losses of 
money 



Amount 
recovered 



Penalties assessed or 
compensations awarded 



AGRICULTURE ^ 

Department 

Fraudulent long-distance telephone charges 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

Department 

Alteration of cheque. Alberta Region 

Shortage with respect to delivery of furniture, Ontario Region 

NATIONAL REVENUE 

Customs and Excise 

Theft of money from a departmental deposit 

Theft of change float and receipts 

Losses of revenue due to fraud or willful misrepresentation 
when filing Federal Sales Tax Returns 

Taxation 

Losses of revenue due to fraud or willful misrepresentation 

when filing income tax returns 

Losses of revenue due to tax evasion 

Fraudulent endorsement of payment instruments 



5.000 



10 



312 

530 

1 



94.141 



950 950 

1.292 1,292 



131 
1,143 

497,635 297,570 



4,765,721 

25,510,142 

347 



No recourse available because perpetrator has not 
been identified. 



Legal action was taken or is in process. Statutory 
and interest penalties were imposed. 



Penalties and fines were assessed. 
Penalties and fines were assessed. 
Case under investigation, results are pending. 



5,858 



30,871,502 299,812 



13*62 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Losses of money or public property — Continued 
Losses of money — Occurrence or discovery in 1984-85 



Brief description of loss 











Amount 




Amount 


Amount 


Amount not 


expected 
to be recovered 


Charged 
to Vote 


of 
loss 


recovered 
in 1984-85 


expected to 
be recovered 


in subsequent 
years 



AGRICULTURE 

Department 

Theft of petty cash at Regina Regional Office, Finance and Administration 

Branch 

Theft of petty cash at Kapuskasing Experimental Farm, Research Branch 

Theft of petty cash at Animal Research Centre, Central Experimental Farm 

Theft of receipts at the Animal Research Centre, Central Experimental Farm 

Standing advance for hospitality stolen at Petawawa National Forestry Institute.... 
Theft of petty cash at Winnipeg sub-office of Canadian Forestry Service 

COMMUNICATIONS 

National Museums of Canada 

Theft of petty cash 

CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS 

Department 

Theft of money from coin operated photocopier 

Theft of taxi coupons 

Theft of petty cash 

Restrictive Trade Practices Commission 

Theft of petty cash 

EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

Department 

Theft of petty cash at the Bedford CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the Longueuil CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the Montreal Centre CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the Montreal Jarry CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the Montreal Regional Office, Employment Development 

Branch 

Theft of petty cash at the Montreal East CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the Joliette CEC 

Theft of UI overpayment recovery at the Cowansville CEC (reimbursement of UI 

overpayment stolen) 

Fraudulent manipulation of monies collected 

Falsefication of documents to permit a third party to receive UI benefits 

Loss of petty cash at the Barrie Employment Development Branch 

Loss of UI overpayment recovery at the Kingston CEC 

Loss of petty cash at the Ottawa South CEC 

Loss of UI overpayment recovery at the High Park CEC 

Theft of petty cash at the North West Territories Directorate in Yellowknife 

Loss of petty cash at the Alberta/NWT Region Office 

Loss of a Transportation Loan payment by the cashier in the Alberta/NWT 

Region 

Loss of petty cash at the Regina district office 

Goods were charged but not present in the inventory at the Saskatchewan 

Regional Office Employment Development Branch 

Misuse of the telephone system in the Manitoba Region 

Loss of U I overpayment recovery in the mail in the BC/Yukon Region 

Theft of petty cash at the Charlesburg CEC 

Fraudulent manipulation of public money at the Sudbury CEC (Postage Meter 

and Petty Cash) 

Fraudulent travel expenses at the Sudbury CEC 

Loss of petty cash at the Winnipeg East CEC 

Submission of false travel claims and taxi receipts NHQ 

Fraudulent travel claims, Ont 

Fraudulent travel claims, Brandon, Man 

Theft of petty cash at the CEC Flin Flon, Man 

ENVIRONMENT 

Department 

Theft of petty cash fund at Gros Morne National Park 

Theft of petty cash fund at the National Wildlife Research Centre in Hull, Que .... 
Theft of petty cash fund at the Western and Northern Region Office Edmonton 

Alta 

Theft of revenue receipts resulting from a break-in at Rideau Canal lockstation .... 



1 


37 


5 


130 


5 


78 


5 


2,192 


36b 


42 


36b 


60 



75 



10 



30 



40 

176 

20 



69 



37 
130 
78 
2,192 
42 
60 



30 



40 
176 



69 



10 


56 




56 


20 


II 




11 


10 


80 




80 


10 


56 




56 


10 


121 




121 


10 


102 




102 


10 


33 




33 


10 


70 




70 




3,591 


3,591 






8,471 






10 


100 




100 


10 


60 




60 


10 


192 




192 


10 


109 




109 


10 


5 




5 


10 


100 




100 


20 


100 




100 


10 


25 


25 




10 


1,251 


1,251 




5 


1,274 






10 


376 




376 


10 


40 




40 


10 


23 


23 




10 


29 




29 


10 


68 




68 


10 


840 


840 




10 


132 




132 


10 


1.062 


1,062 




10 


37 


37 




20 


268 




268 


5 


265 




265 


5 


363 




363 


20 


27 




27 



20 



8,471 



1,274 



SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA TION ACT 

Losses of money or public property — Continued 

Losses of money — Occurrence or discovery in 1984-85 — Continued 



13*63 



Brief description of loss 





Amount 


Amount 


Charged 


of 


recovered 


to Vote 


loss 


in 1984-85 



Amount 
expected 
Amount not to be recovered 
expected to in subsequent 
be recovered years 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

Department 

Shortage in cash account at Post Abroad — Zimbabwe non-budgetary 

Shortage in cash account at Post Abroad — USSR non-budgetary 

Revenue lost in transit from Post Abroad — Peru 

Shortage in emergency cash parcel Post Abroad — Lebanon ($2,500 US) non-budgetary 

Canadian International Development Agency 

Personal use of taxi vouchers 35 

FISHERIES AND OCEANS 

Department 

Theft of fishing license revenue at Tracadie Area Office 

INDIAN AFFAIRS AND NORTHERN DEVELOPMENT 

Department 

Theft of security in cash from our Mineral Rights Section of our Yukon regional 

office 

Fraud by employee — Social allowance cheques raised for non-existing persons 

NATIONAL DEFENCE 

Theft of money from CFB Trenton 

Theft of money from CFS Harrington 

Suspected arson CFB Chilliwack 

Suspected alteration of travel document by employee CFB Kingston 

Loss caused by negligence of employees full restitution order HMCS Mackenzie... 

Cash shortages: cause of shortages could not be determined. The possibility of 

human error, clerical error or lost voucher exists. Total $3,445 as follows: 

CCON Cyprus 

CFB Cold Lake 

CFBComox 

CFB Edmonton 

CFBGagetown 

CFB Halifax 

CFBLahr 

CFSLowther 

CFSMoisie 

CFB Montreal 

CFB Petawawa 

CFB St Jean 

CFB Trenton 

CFB Valcartier 

HMCS Annapolis 

HMCS Cormorant 

HMCS Preserver 

HMCS Protecteur 

HMCS Provider 

HMCS Saskatchewan 

NDHQ 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Department 

Personal use of taxi vouchers 

NATIONAL REVENUE 

Customs and Excise 

Petty cash shortage 

False travel claim submitted by Auditor 

Loss of security deposit • 

Fraudulent completion of attendance registers and submissions of false claims for 

shift differential and commuting allowances 

Personal use of Government telephones 

Cash shortages: total gross shortages $5,091; total gross overages $5,047 



25 



1,419 


1,419 


758 




367 


300 


3.418 





158 



195 



294 



270 
113 
200 

3.043 

466 

44 



1S8 



3.418 



195 



20 


300 




300 


15 


43,862 




39,864 




323 




323 




86 




86 




200 




200 




100 




100 




2,500 








786 




786 




20 




20 




35 




35 




50 




50 




150 




ISO 




478 




478 




529 




529 




31 




31 




29 


29 






129 




129 




106 


56 


50 




16 




16 




40 




40 




232 




232 




40 




40 




86 




86 




100 




100 




100 




100 




50 


50 






238 


238 






200 




200 



294 



113 



466 



200 



44 



758 
67 



3.998 



2,500 



270 



3.043 



13 '64 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Losses of money or public property — Continued 

Losses of money — Occurrence or discovery in 1984-85 — Concluded 



Brief description of loss 











Amount 










expected 




Amount 


Amount 


Amount not 


to be recovered 


Charged 


of 


recovered 


expected to 


in subsequent 


to Vote 


loss 


in 1984-85 


be recovered 


years 



Taxation 

Ex cashier at Victoria District Office committed eight separate defalcations 

between July 27, 1983 and September 6, 1984 5 

Cash shortages: total gross shortages $360; total gross overages $366 5 

An ex-mailroom clerk at the Jonqui^re Taxation Centre stole two cheques 
amounting to $563.45. The initial investigation commenced July 29, 1983 and 
on February 3, 1984 the employee was charged. Judgement was rendered June 
10, 1985 at which time the employee was put on probation for a period of three 
(3) years. No restitution of money was requested by the judge 5 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

Department 

Citizenship registration fees cash shortages 1 

SOLICITOR GENERAL 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Theft of money from fines 

Theft of money from petty cast fund 

SUPPLY AND SERVICES 

Department (Supply Program) 

Theft of money from safe at Disposal Operations (Burglary March 24, 1985) statutory 

Theft of petty cashes from Head Office, Hull statutory 

TRANSPORT 

Department 

Theft of a standing advance account Winnipeg International Airport 65 

Theft at Ontario Region Toronto International Airport statutory 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 
False or fraudulent claim for payment (travel claim) 



1,662 
6 



S63 



2S 



1,662 



130 

75 



2,807 
92 



640 
700 



830 
91,302 



830 
10,782 



563 



25 



130 



2,807 
92 



640 
700 



58,382 



75 



22,138 



SUPPLEMENTARY IN FORMA TION REQUIRED BY THE FINANCIAL ADMIN ISTRA TION ACT 

Losses of money or public property — Concluded 

Losses of money — Changes to cases reported in previous years Public Accounts 



13*65 



Brief description of loss 













Amount 


Year loss 




Amount 






expected 


reported 


Amount 


recovered 


Amount 


Amount not 


to be recovered 


in Public 


of original 


m previous 


recovered 


expected to 


in subsequent 


Accounts 


loss 


years 


in 1984-85 


be recovered 


years 



EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION 

Department 

Payments to a third party based on a false declaration 

Conflict of interests permitting a third party to receive UI benefits 
Submission of false overtime claims and misuse of taxi vouchers. 

The employee was suspended 

Submission of false overtime claims and misuse of taxi vouchers. 

The employee was discharged 

Submission of false overtime claims and misuse of taxi vouchers. 

The employee was suspended 

Submission of false travel claims. The employee was suspended .... 

NATIONAL DEFENCE 

Deficiency in Working Capital Imprest partially recovered from 

ex-Private's return of pension contributions CFS Mont Apica .... 
Advance not recovered prior to release of member CFB Comox .... 

Loss due to fraud and theft by an employee CFB Moose Jaw 

Cash shortages reported outstanding in previous years. Canadian 
Contingent, United Nations: 

Middle East 

CFB Kingston 

CFB Valcartier 

CFB Borden 

CFB Moose Jaw 

CFB Calgary 

HMCSSaguenay 

NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Department 

Misappropriation of funds through the sale of public property. 
Due to lack of evidence, all charges laid by the RCMP have 
been dropped 

Misappropriation of funds through the sale of public property. 
The employee has been convicted and the Probation order 
requires him to make full restitution to the Receiver General for 
Canada 

Fabrication of fraudulent contracts for services of individuals 
from 1975 to 1980. Employee was dismissed by the Ministry of 
State for Social Development and subsequently charged and 
convicted. The court has ordered full restitution 

NATIONAL REVENUE 

Customs and Excise 

Purchase of gasoline made by use of government credit card for 
personal use 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Department 

Misappropriation of receipts by an employee 

SOLICITOR GENERAL 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Shortage of exhibit money (previously reported for 83/84 Public 
Accounts. Submission to Treasury Board made in August/84 
requesting authority to write-off. TB advise that write-off not 
required as loss involves cash rather than a receivable) 

TRANSPORT 

Department 

Misappropriations of public funds through alterations of deposit 
slips 



1983-84 
1983-84 


2.000 
1.080 


1983-84 


5,399 


1983-84 


10.500 


1983-84 
1983-84 


9,409 
828 



1978-79 


7,675 


1975-76 


350 


1983-84 


2,227 


1983-84 


112 


1983-84 


100 


1983-84 


100 


1983-84 


100 


1983-84 


50 


1983-84 


45 


1983-84 


20 



1983-84 



1983-84 



1981-82 



1983-84 



1982-83 



1983-84 



1962-63 



500 

I3,054(') 

224.349(2' 

57 
12,735 



200 



42,800 



333,690 



547 



3.867 



1.453 
1,080 

5.399 

10.500 

6,455 
828 



100 

2,227 



2,954 



3,708 
350 



112 
100 
100 

too 

SO 
4S 
20 



500 



25,516 



3,554 



1,734 



57 



9.500 



197.099 



12,735 



200 



11,723 



600 



30,477 



41,653 



33,987 



18,020 



240.030 



<" Amends reporting in previous year's Public Accounts. 

"' National Health and Welfare has been authorized to handle the accounting for and reporting of this case. 



SECTION 14 



1984-85 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS 



Other Miscellaneous 
Information 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Financial assistance given to railways by the Government of 

Canada in 1984-85 14.2 

Losses of $1,000 or more due to accidental destruction of, or 

damage to, assets 14.5 

Return on investments 14.6 

Report of surplus material disposed of in 1984-85 14.10 

Public debt charges 14.12 

Capital leases 14.16 

Education leave costs 14.18 



14-2 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Financial assistance given to railways by the Government of Canada in 1984-85 
(with cumulative figures to March 31, 1985) 



The 1952 Canadian National Railways Capital Revision 
Act stated that "The Minister shall include annually in the 
Public Accounts a summary statement of all assistance, 
including land grants, guarantees and capital subsidies but not 
including grants made pursuant to statutes for the relief of 
unemployment, that has at any time been given by the Govern- 
ment of Canada to each of (a) the National System (Canadian 
National Railway System), including its predecessor compa- 
nies; (b) the Pacific Railways (Canadian Pacific Limited) as 
defined in the 1952 Canadian National-Canadian Pacific Act, 
including its predecessor companies; and (c) any other 
railway". 

The following statement presents the budgetary and non- 
budgetary financial assistance showing annual and cumulative 



payments. Only individual payments of $50,000 or over are 
reported in this statement. 

Railways have been interpreted to include the following for 
purposes of this statement: (i) for Canadian National Rail- 
ways — all companies owned, operated or managed by Canadi- 
an National, (ii) for Canadian Pacific — only companies 
engaged in transportation, communications and hotel activi- 
ties. 

Non-budgetary assistance represents the net increase or 
decrease to loans, investments and advances. 

Budgetary assistance represents a charge to budgetary 
appropriations which affect the annual deficit or surplus of the 
Government. 



Financial assistance given to railways by the Government of Canada in 1984-85 
(with cumulative figures to March 31, 1985) 



1984-85 



Cumulative budgetary and 

non-budgetary assistance 

as at March 31, 1985 



CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY SYSTEM<')<2) 

Non-budgetary 

Repayments of loans and advances - 8,095,71 1 

Capital stock issues^" 6,100,000 

Total - 1.995.7 U 

Budgetary 

Allowance for Newfoundland employees transferred to Canadian National Railway 1,688,314 

Atlantic provinces capital investments in energy conservation 82,962 

Atlantic Region Freight Assistance Act (s) 7,949,930 

Capital cost of rehabilitation of Prairie Branch Railway Lines 62,900,000 

Energy Administration Act (s) 6,731,514 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 12,833,799 

Railway Act (s) 54,023,395 

Railway employee Provident Fund 3,264,169 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 2,351,868 

Termination of the collection of tolls on the Victoria Bridge (s) 2,586,466 

Testing and evaluation of railway operation in Newfoundland 1,445,816 

Western Grain Transportation Act (s) 330,240,471 

Total 486.098.704 

CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITED<2) 

Budgetary 

Atlantic Region Freight Assistance Act (s) 1,973,010 

Capital cost of rehabilitation of Prairie Branch Railway Lines 70,000,000 

Energy Administration Act (s) 862,121 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 1,172,340 

Railway Act (s) 17.629,327 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 1,893,776 

Western Grain Transportation Act (s) 284,671,486 

Total 378.202.060 



227,583,152 
2,625,877,732 
2.853.460.884 



3.291.810.151* 



1.169.700.576 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 



14*3 



Financial assistance given to railways by the Government of Canada in 1984-85 
(with cumulative flgures to March 31, 1985) — Continued 



1984-85 



Cumulative budgetary and 

non-budgetary assistance 

as at March 31. 1985 



VIA RAIL CANADA INC. 

Non-budgetary 
Capital stock<*> 

Budgetary 

Capital costs 44,623,000 

Operating costs and labour assistance 492,893,231 

Total ; '..'.Zl 537.516,231 

BRITISH YUKON RAILWAY COMPANY 

Non-budgetary 
Loan repayment -250,000 

OTHER RAILWAYS 
Budgetary 
Algoma Central Railway — 

Environment 2000 program 126,737 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Railway Act (s) 3,081,491 

British Northern Railway — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Burlington Northern Inc. — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Canada and Gulf Terminal Railway^'' — 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 154,899 

Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Company — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Consolidated Rail Corporation — 

Railway Act (s) 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 1 18,805 

Devco Railway (Cumberland Railway Company) — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Dominion Atlantic Railway^*^ — 

Atlantic Region Freight Rates Act (s) 151,529 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 291,948 

Essex Terminal Railway — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Grand Falls Central Railway Co. Ltd. — 

Atlantic Region Freight Assistance Act (s) 204,012 

Napierville Junction Railway — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Northern Alberta Railway^'' — 

Railway Act (s) 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Ontario Northland — 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Penn Central Corporation — 

Railway Act (s) 

Quebec Central Railway'*' — 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 78,790 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Company'*' — 

Railway Act (s) 

Railway Relocation and Crossing Act 

Total 4.208.211 



9,300,000 



3.155.112,792 



4,750,000 



126.737 

51,545 

14,261.358 

32.836 

197,509 

579,994 

235,065 

751,701 
287,524 

71,116 

457,219 
855,495 

30,616 

553,457 

255,572 

19,506,757 
45.019 

52.401 

153,691 

199,198 

684,127 

85,854 

39.474.791 



14 •4 PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 

Financial assistance given to railways by the Government of Canada in 1984-85 
(with cumulative figures to March 31, 1985) — Concluded 

Cumulative budgetary and 
non-budgetary assistance 
1984-85 as at March 31, 1985 



$ i 

OTHER 

Budgetary 

Albert Southern Railway, New Brunswick 50,460 

Brantford, Waterloo and Lake Erie Railway 57,600 

Bruce Mines and Algoma Railway 53,920 

Canada Central Railway — Peace River Bridge 175,000 

Central Railway of Canada, Quebec 30,145 

Colchester Coal and Railways Company 12,800 

Dominion Coal Company, Nova Scotia 87,808 

Edmonton, Dunvegan and British Columbia Railway 338,382 

Erie and Huron Railway 96,000 

Ha Ha Bay Railway, New Brunswick 231,462 

Harvey Branch Railway, New Brunswick 5,554 

Joggins Railway, Nova Scotia 37,500 

Klondyke Mines Railway 197,184 

Lake Erie, Essex and Detroit Railway 1 1 8,400 

Lake Erie and Detroit River Railway 357,451 

L'Assomption Railway, Quebec 11,200 

Leamington and St Clair Railway 51,200 

Maritime Coal and Railway Company 3,200 

Minudie Coal Company, Nova Scotia 18,544 

North Railway 250,000 

North Shore Railway Company, Beersville Coal and Railway Company 27,616 

Northern New Brunswick Seaboard Railway Company 108,160 

Ottawa and New York Railway 262,384 

Pacific Great Eastern Railway 2,478,500 

Phillipsburg Junction and Quarry Company 23,712 

Pontiac and Renfrew Railway 13,600 

Port Nelson Terminal 6,240,096 

Quebec, Montmorency and Charlevoix Railway 96,000 

Residue of cost of steamer Sheba 78,611 

Schomberg and Aurora Railway 46,144 

St Lawrence and Adirondack Railway 149,482 

St Louis Richibucto Railway 22,400 

Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway 2,134,080 

Total 13.864.595 



Total— Non-budgetary -2,245,711 2,867,510,884 

Budgetary 1,406,025,206 7,669,962,905 



OTHER ASSISTANCE 

Remission of duty and excise taxes (1984-85 only) 

Burlington Northern Railway 284,635 

Canadian National Railway System 413,928 

Canadian Pacific Limited 3,357,322 

Consolidated Rail Corporation 66,858 

Napierville Junction Railway 58,229 

4,180,972 



* Figures restated for cumulative assistance of $309,674,591 related to CN Marine Inc., control of which was transferred to the Government during the year. 

(s) Statutory authority. 

<" Canadian National Railways Company. The Corporation is a beneficiary of loan guarantees by the Government amounting to $97,347,000 in 1985 ($163,052,000 in 

1984). 
(^) Cumulative land grants given to Canadian National Railway System including predecessor and affiliated companies and to Canadian Pacific Railway Company and 

other companies included in that system are 5,728,912 and 32,848,477 acres respectively. 
(^) 12,200 additional common shares purchased by the Government in 1984-85. Total shares issued: 6,523,902 no par value shares. 
<*) Total shares issued: 93,000 no par value shares. 
<^) Controlled by Canadian National Railway. 
<" Controlled by Canadian Pacific Limited. 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS IN FORMA TION 14 . 5 

Losses of $1,000 or more due to accidental destruction of, or damage to, assets which would normally be covered by 
insurance had insurance existed 

The Government does not generally place insurance on movable and immovable property. The Government, therefore, absorbs 
losses when they occur. 



Department and agency 



Buildings 



Contents 



Agriculture 

Communications — 

Department 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications 
Commission 

National Museums of Canada 

Consumer and Corporate Affairs 

Employment and Immigration 

Energy, Mines and Resources 

Environment 171,500 

External Affairs 

Fisheries and Oceans 3,100 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development 236,000 

National Defence 1,248,993 

National Health and Welfare 

National Revenue — 

Taxation 

Public Works 

Regional Industrial Expansion 

Science and Technology — 

National Research Council of Canada 

Secretary of State — 

Public Service Commission 

Solicitor General — 

Correctional Service 15,250 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 30,700 

Supply and Services — 

Department — 
Supply program 

Statistics Canada 

Transport 

Veterans Affairs 

Total 1,705,543 



Equipment 



Vehicles 



Miscellaneous 



Toul 



69,740 
2,282 



1,500 
76,954 



6,619 
10,580 



s 


S 


S 


$ 


1,846<') 


1I6.753(« 


25,690<" 


144,289 


28.767<«) 






28.767 


3,000 


4,660 




7.660 




55,672 




55.672 


4,802(5> 


8,178 




12.980 


38,257<«> 


14,616 




122,613 


5,359(^) 


26,745 




32,104 


96.276<») 


I12,450<») 


32,356("» 


414,864 




99,520<") 




99.520 


340,146('2> 


96,731 




439,977 


81,500('3> 


44,646 


6.311<'*> 


369,957 


16,500 


1,499,404 


522,932<'5' 


3,364.783 


11,483<'« 


6,912 


1,499 


19.894 






12,263<") 


12,263 


54.544<'») 


41,174(") 


12,187 


107,905 




3,850 




3,850 


18,243 


2,723 


18.064<»> 


39.030 


26,034(2') 




80(») 


26.114 


6,783 


74,048 


11,702(") 


1 14.402 


115,572(") 


1,049,042 


1,700 


1.207.594 




2,313 




2.313 




1,729 




1.729 


45,027(") 


91,720<») 


269,099<"> 


405.846 




4.827 




4.827 



167.675 



894.139 



3.357,713 



913,883 



7,038.953 



<•> Includes theft of chain-saws (9) $1,846. 

<2' Includes theft of all terrain vehicle (1) $2,349. 

<^' Includes theft of the following items: word processor (1) $8,925; typewriters (2) $2,126; balances (2) $4,542; cameras (2) $4,597; and VHS recorder (1) $5,500. 

<*' Includes theft of the following items: business computer (1) $6,715; telidon keypad decoder (1) $2,150; teletex decoders (3) $5,040; computer terminal (1) $1,480; 

and oscilloscope ( 1 ) $8,846. 
(^> Includes theft of the following items: VCR recorders (4) $3,602; and attache case, gauges, calipers, calculators, and small tools $1,200. 
(*' Includes theft of the following items: video camera (1) $1,487; and recorder (1) $1,050. 
<" Includes theft of reflector prisms (3) $2,555. 

<*) Includes theft of the following items: incubator (1) $296; PH meter (1) $291; vacuum pump (1) $1,590; trailer mobile laboratory (1) $5,063; bio-oxygen demand 
instrument (1) $125; mercury motor 20 h.p. (1) $610; bathimograph (1) $3,600; rosette sampler (1) $19,674; water level recorder (1) $2,040; and aluminum boat 
(1) $1,050. 
('> Includes theft of a truck $17,500. 

<'°> Includes theft of the following items: brass oil lamps (2) $440; signal flags (11) $1,860; amplifier (1) $744; and 16mm projector (1) $995. 
<"' Includes theft of vehicles (4) $43,000. 

<'2> Includes theft of the following items: marine radio telephone (1) $600; calculators (7) $708; battery charger (1) $100; flare kit (1) $30; mini grinder (1) $159; VHF 
portable radios (2) $1,256; balances (3) $2,850; radiophones (2) $2,569; motor (1) $1,074; chain-saw (1) $548; drill (1) $60; drill bit set (I) $31; chain hoist (I) 
$308; metres (2) $535; power supply (1) $100; pumps (3) $1,321; winch (1) $150; illuminator (1) $50; Are extinguisher (1) $50; vacuum cleaner (1) $67; sleeping 
bags (8) $332; outboard motor (1) $2,698; and press (1) $193. 
I"' Includes theft of projectors (2) $750. 

<'*' Includes theft of the following items: video recorders (2) $2,899; mini-cassette recorders (2) $292; life jackets $210; and stepladder $110. 

('^) Includes theft of the following items: IBM typewriter (1) $1,106; chain-saw and tool kit (1) $1,171; camping equipment $4,380; personal issued equipment $1,026; 
radio and tools $2,626; tool kit and personal issued equipment $2,526; machine guns (2) $1,785; recorders (2) $5,044; generator (1) $1,389; landing boat (I) 
$2,973; clothing and camping equipment $1,080; trombone (1) $1,516; personal issued kit $1,183; survival kit (1) $3,013; floor polisher and vacuum cleaner (1) 
$1,803; radio (1) $1,150; scuba equipment $2,224; photography equipment $1,091; 9 mm pistols (16) $3,883; personal equipment $1,008; and radio set (I) $1,426. 
<'*) Includes theft of the following items: typewriter $1,111; scintillation alpha counter $5,046; and gamma probe $1,800. 

('^) Includes theft of the following items: calculators (1 1) $451; transcriber (1) S595; camera (1) $95; briefcase (1) $35; and pen and pencil pack (1) $4. 
C^) Includes theft of the following items: calculators (2) $212; document-case $70; computer (1) $13,682; floodlights (8) $8,000; video cassette recorders (2) $3,895; 
Mayes smartmodem (1) $1,295; typewriter (1) $375; amplifier (1) $ 1 50; video-proc (1) $125; radio cassette (1) $200; lens (1) $450; Upe recorder ( 1 ) $110; survey 
equipment (46) $17,395; outboard motor (1) $1,434; and camera (1) $900. 
(") Includes theft of a Ford 1 ton crew cab truck (1) $20,000. 
(2°) Includes theft of the following items: balances (4) $5,544; socket sets (2) $515; dictating machines (2) $456; oscilloscopes (2) $3,270; generators (2) $2,094; 

protectovane (1) $25 1 ; cartridge (1) $84; stapler (1) $25; motor (1) $250; multimeters (2) $781; radios (2) $3,460; and power pack (1) $1,334. 
(2') Includes theft of the following items: cassette recorders (11) $3,500; radio cassette (1) $150; video cassettes (2) $3,880; camera (1) $1,490; projector (1) $800; video 

recorders (2) $3,951; typewriters (11) $9,898; color television (1) $500; video camera (1) $300; TV convenor (1) $120; and dictaphones (2) $300. 
(^2) Includes theft of the following items: microphone JVC (1) $20; and cassettes (3) $60. 
(2^) Includes theft of Export A cigarettes (undetermined quantity) $5,195. 
<"> Includes theft of the following items: SSB base station (1) $1,000; VHF mobile Century II (1) $1,000; VHF portable MT500 (3) $10,800; mobile VHF 

MCX-XlOO (1) $2,200; portable MX350 VHF (1) $4,300; portable HT220 (1) $1,100; and mobile Mocom 70 (1) $1,400. 
<2^' Includes theft of the following items: transceiver (1) $1,100; oscilloscopes (2) $3,593; frequency counters (2) $2,792; and modulation meter (1) $1,000. 
<2*' Includes theft of the following items: motorized toboggan (1) $2,369; and compressor generator (1) $1,250. 

(2^> Includes theft of the following items: liferaft (1) $2,500; generator (1) $1,100; racan radar transponder (1) $35,590; outboard motor (1) $1,000; and pneumatic 
boat (1) $2,000. 



14'6 

Return on investments 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 





Amount 


Amount 


invested at 


realized in 


March 31, 


1 984-85" ) 


1985(2) 



LOANS, INVESTMENTS AND 

ADVANCES— 
Crown corporations — 

LENDING INSTITUTIONS— 
Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Canada Mortgage and Housing Cor- 
poration 

Interest $ 873,299,069 

Transfer of profit... 39,654,226 



Export Development Corporation 

Farm Credit Corporation 

Federal Business Development Bank . 
Total lending institutions 



ALL OTHER CROWN CORPORA- 
TIONS— 

Air Canada 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Canada Development Investment Cor- 
poration 

Canadair Limited 

Canadian National Railways 

Interest $ 19,211,633 

Dividends 42,466,690 

Petro-Canada 



40,000,000 
9,859,702,391 



912,953,295 

24,069,088 889,711,654 
451,944,113 4,328,362,035 

33,838,333 557,000,000 
1,422,804,829 15,674,776,080 



17,626,253 556,688,264 
81,581,084 795,085,088 

395,658,315 

739,959 

2,853,460,884 



Other- 
Bank of Canada 

Transfer of profit 

Canada Ports Corporation 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Au- 
thority 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

Canadian Commercial Corporation .. 

Canadian Dairy Commission 

Canadian Film Development Corpo- 
ration 

Canadian National (West Indies) 
Steamships Ltd 

Canadian Patents and Development 
Limited 

Canadian Saltfish Corporation 

Cape Breton Development Corpora- 
tion 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Corpo- 
ration 

Halifax Port Corporation 

Loto Canada Inc 

Montreal Port Corporation 

National Capital Commission 

Northern Canada Power Commis- 
sion 

Northern Transportation Company 
Limited 

Pecheries Canada Inc 

Pecheries Cartier Inc 

Prince Rupert Port Corporation 

Royal Canadian Mint 

Interest $ 1,390,770 

Transfer of profit 3,300,000 



61,678,323 
160.885.660 



1,852,185,490 
1,175,575 

984,547 



18,113,722 



2,252,579 

1,158,545 

541,947 
2,091,213 

18,685,201 

2,293,636 



4,690,770 



4,299,126,174 
8.900.758.684 

5,920,000 

87,649,678 

14,306,914 

3,500,000 

33,000,000 

10,000,000 

116,622,000 

6,313,935 

325,000 

296,199 
12.335,000 

13,442,244 

16,010,205 

25,555,762 

1 

141,365,374 

26,308,948 

230,960,629 

52,105,590 
31,489,900 
10,000 
27,084,979 
12,100,590 



Amount 
Amount invested at 

realized in March 3 1 , 

1984-85"> 1985'^' 

i $ 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority, The 624,950,000 
Jacques Cartier and Champlain 

Bridges Incorporated, The 59,752,867 

Teleglobe Canada 251,327 4,577,976 

Uranium Canada, Limited 9 

Vancouver Port Corporation 361,178 81,1 60,867 

VIA Rail Canada Inc 9,300,000 

1.904,785.730 1.646.444,667 

Total all other Crown corporations 2,065,671,390 10,547,203,351 

Total Crown corporations 3,488,476,219 26,221,979,431 



Provincial and territorial governments — 

NEWFOUNDLAND— 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 266,536 3,661,214 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrange- 
ments 37,071,621 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 310,603 5,410,527 

Special development loans programs 472,862 6,700,000 

Winter capital projects fund 377,248 7,080,196 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry- 
over projects 176,052 1,035,107 

Atlantic Provinces Power Develop- 
ment Act 7,807,912 79,171,086 

Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 4,092,537 36,490,716 

13.503.750 176.620,467 

NOVA SCOTIA— 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Regional electrical interconnections.. 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program .. 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry- 
over projects 

Atlantic Provinces Power Develop- 
ment Act 

Mainland Investments Limited 

Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 

Transport — 
Loading ramp, Yarmouth, NS 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— 
Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Regional electrical interconnections.. 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program .. 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry- 
over projects 

Comprehensive development plan 
agreement 



321,193 



273,174 

155,568 
324,220 
433,077 



324,178 

3,186,303 
140,000 



3,441 
7.906.914 



859,403 



22,271 



2,555,284 



3,397,738 

2,434,793 
4,300,000 
4,582,942 



4,102,124 

43,163,005 
1,500,000 



2,745,760 24,837,822 



28,676 
90.902.384 



8,526,857 



210,169 



48,598 841,297 

15,435 213,582 

147,737 1,112,813 



1,948 

925,298 
2.020.690 



24,975 

11,554,151 
22.483.844 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 
Return on investments — Continued 



14-7 





Amount 


Amount 


invested at 


realized in 


March 31. 


1984-850) 


1985<» 





Amount 


Amount 


invested at 


realized in 


March 31. 


1984-85<'> 


I985"> 



NEW BRUNSWICK— 
Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Regional electrical interconnections . 4.887,043 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 454,189 6,435,049 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 201,390 5,958,031 

Special development loans program .. 398,288 5,375,000 

Town of Oromocto 5,041 44,264 

Winter capital projects fund 791.201 9,596,373 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Atlantic Development Board carry- 
over projects 68,329 868,818 

Atlantic Provinces Power Develop- 
ment Act 2,944,862 42,989,199 

Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 3,533,747 41,936,757 

8.397.047 118.090.534 

QUEBEC— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 4,523,997 61,300,779 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrange- 
ments 58,944 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 2,848,755 50,214,852 

Special development loans program .. 4,952,180 70,300.000 

Winter capital projects fund 7,663.058 91,314,928 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 10,658,331 101,529,166 

30.705.265 374.659.725 

ONTARIO— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program .. 
Winter capital projects fund 



772,223 10,223,077 



1,583,730 
127,244 
3,272,322 
5.755.519 



MANITOBA— 

Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Advances 

Loans 38,363 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Regional electrical interconnections .. 1 1 ,786,75 1 
Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 324,385 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program .. 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 



SASKATCHEWAN— 
Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Advances 

Loans 

South Saskatchewan River project — 

Treasury bills 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Federal-provincial fiscal arrange- 
ments 

Municipal Development and Loan 
Board 



24,158,836 

1,767,624 

34,301,276 

70.450.813 



392 

7,091,545 

130,189,693 



4,259,033 



281,459 
302,919 
216,155 


4,454,710 
4,256,680 
2,505,491 


541,944 
3.491.976 


3,034,757 
155.792.301 


666,912 


28,121 
6,125,727 


361,600 


4,540,000 


62,078 


805.717 




45,826,000 


137,534 
1.228.124 


1,935,605 
59.261.170 



250,967 



310.232 



3.412.233 



ALBERTA— 
Agriculture — 
Agricultural service centres — 

Loans 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program . 

Winter capital projects fund 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 
Special areas and highways agree- 
ment 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Municipal Development and Loan 

Board 

Special development loans program .. 
Winter capital projects fund 

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES— 

Finance — 
Federal-provincial employment loans 

program 

Winter capital projects fund 

Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment — 
Government of the Northwest Terri- 
tories 

YUKON TERRITORY— 

Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment — 
Government of the Yukon Territory 857.242 8.384,601 

Yukon Territory small business 

loans 55,705 362,082 

912.947 8.746.683 

Total provincial and territorial governments 91,213,923 1,146,797,106 

National governments including developing 
countries — 

China— Finance 49,426,1 18 

Greece — Finance 6,214,126 

Jamaica — 
Finance — 
Special program — Economic assist- 
ance 3,021.867 25.000.000 

United Kingdom — 
Finance — 
The United Kingdom Financial 

Agreement Act. 1946 14.995.165 607.025.054 

Developing countries — 
External Affairs — Canadian Interna- 
tional Development Agency — 

Special loan assistance 5,919,622 3.079.954,650 

Development of export trade (loans 
administered by the Export Develop- 
ment Corporation)— External Affairs . 27,101,448 619,286,893 
National Defence — 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization — 
Damage claims recoverable 32.206 

Total national governments including de- 
veloping countries 51.038.102 4.386.939.047 



345.387 
138.000 
372.440 


5,398,889 
4,000.000 
4.240.133 


302.973 
1.409.767 


2.753.626 
20.115.113 


775.328 


10.228.582 


457,314 
1,215,445 
1,482,113 
3.930.200 


7.194,297 
16,944,746 
14,612,349 
48.979.974 


1.640 
26,484 


19,470 
260,370 


1,923,600 
1.951.724 


414,258 
694.098 



14*8 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Return on investments — Continued 



Amount 
Amount invested at 

realized in March 31, 

1984-850 1985(« 



Amount 
realized in 
1984-85<" 



Amount 

invested at 

March 3 1 , 

1985<2) 



laternational organizations — 

International financial institutions 587,738,755 

International organizations and associa- 
tions — 

United Nations bonds 24,732 850,887 

Other 5,293,955 

Other international organizations 1,937,546,839 

Total international organizations 24,732 2,531,430,436 

Veterans' Land Act Fund— Advances 12,007.396 192,362,763 

Joint and mixed enterprises — 

Canada Development Corporation — Re- 
gional Industrial Expansion 322,000,000 

Cooperative Energy Corporation — Ener- 
gy, Mines and Resources 57,804,000 

Lower Churchill Development Corpora- 
tion — Energy, Mines and Resources .... 14,750,000 

Newfoundland and Labrador Develop- 
ment Corporation Limited — Regional 
Industrial Expansion 2,625,000 25,000,200 

N.S. Holdco Limited —Fisheries and 
Oceans 30,500,000 

125459 Canada Limited — Fisheries and 
Oceans 90,775,000 

Sociit6 Inter-Port de Quebec — Regional 

Industrial Expansion 400 

T6lcsat Canada— Communications 30,000,000 

Dividends 1,500,000 

Total joint and mixed enterprises 4,125,000 570,829,600 

Miscellaneous — 

Loans and accountable advances — 
External Affairs — 

Personnel posted abroad 568,024 8,052,676 

Posts abroad 6,974,540 

568.024 15.027.216 
National Defence — 
Imprest accounts, standing advances 

and authorized loans 33,943,867 

Regional Industrial Expansion — 

Personnel posted in Canada 1,563 

Supply and Services — 

Miscellaneous departmental ac- 
countable advances 4,833,854 

Treasury Board — 

Miscellaneous departmental ac- 
countable imprest and standing 

advances 12,839,195 

Total loans and accountable advances 568,024 66,645,695 

Other miscellaneous — 
Agriculture — 
Construction of multi-purpose exhi- 
bition buildings 1,993,053 22,555,159 

Communications — 

Cultural property 3,920 

Employment and Immigration — 

Assisted passage scheme 754,947 54,825,671 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Hydro-Quebec Research Institute ... 2,625,145 13,277,443 
External Affairs — 
Development of export trade (loans 
administered by the Export De- 
velopment Corporation) 17,943,786 344,231,096 

Finance — 
Ottawa Civil Service Recreational 

Association 15,063 307,425 

Saint John Harbour Bridge Author- 
ity 11,687,464 



Town of Oromocto 1,045 12,129 

Town of Oromocto Development 

Corporation 20,957 348,272 

37,065 12.355.290 
Fisheries and Oceans — 
Canadian producers of frozen 

groundfish 47,992 658,879 

Groundfish processors 192,889 

Haddock fishermen 5,823 1,405,981 

53.815 2.257.749 

Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment — 

British Yukon Railway Company 4,7 50,000 

Canadian Arctic Producers Co-oper- 
ative Limited 9,327 122,991 

Chippewa Band of Kettlepoint 65,000 

Council for Yukon Indians 3,806,756 

Eskimo loan fund 217,287 2,894,355 

Indian economic development 2,328,437 46,505,056 

Indian housing assistance 4,488,744 

Indians and Inuit of Quebec 267,606 

Native claimants 1,436.997 77,594,243 

4.259.654 140.227.145 
Labour — 
Provincial workmen's compensation 

boards 4,515,000 

National Defence — 

Canadian Forces housing projects .... 1,971,775 15,498,496 

Public Works — 

Burgeo Leasing Limited 20,723 157,597 

Eurocan Pulp and Paper Co Ltd 1 16,865 1,350.000 

Oil refinery terminal wharf at 
Come-by-Chance. Newfoundland 1 9,3 1 1 ,904 

Sydney Steel Corporation 5,218,162 

137.588 26.037.663 
Regional Industrial Expansion — 

Canadian defence industry 22,545,377 

Canadian manufacturers of automo- 
tive products 175,319 

Consolidated Computer Incorpo- 
rated 12,395,998 

Enterprise development program 231,255 19,979,464 

Footwear and tanning industries 

adjustment program 1,647 80,069 

Industrial and regional development 

program 12.515 1,250,000 

Kennedy Round agreement 952,096 

Pharmaceutical industry develop- 
ment assistance program 173 

Radio Engineering Products Limited 1,000,000 

420.909 58.203.004 
Solicitor General — 

Parolees 19,331 

Supply and Services — 

Defence production loan account 1,724.007 

Transport — 

Coast Ferries Limited 100.000 

Corporation of the City of Montreal 22,608 642,338 

Hamilton Harbour Commissioners .. 62,476 1,166,273 

Lakehead Harbour Commission 29,981 354,661 

Port Alberni Harbour Commission .. 78,946 978,538 

194.011 3.241.810 
Veterans Affairs — 
Commonwealth War Graves Com- 
mission 50,874 

Total other miscellaneous 30,391,748 699,023,658 

Total miscellaneous 30,959,772 765,669,353 

Total loans, investments and advances 3,677.845,144 35,816,007,736 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 
Return on investments — Concluded 



14*9 



FOREIGN EXCHANGE ACCOUNTS— 

Exchange Fund Account — Advances 

Transfer of profit 

International Monetary Fund — Subscrip- 
tions 

Transfer of profit 

Total foreign exchange accounts 

CASH— 

Interest on bank deposits 



Amount 
Amount invested at 

realized in March 31, 

1984-85<') 1985W 

S S 

4.176,638.730 



413,997,251 



14,963,537 



3,985,260,870 



OTHER ACCOUNTS— 

Interest on loans to the Unemployment In- 
surance Account — Finance 

Government's holdings of unmatured debt .. 

Interest $ 37,230,440 

Transfer of profit 32,034,183 

Rent from properties — Public Works — 
Rental 

Interest on investment re: military pur- 
chases — Supply and Services 

Supply revolving fund — Supply and Ser- 
vices 

Government Telecommunications Agency 
revolving fund — Communications 

Canada Lands Company — Mirabel — 
Public Works 

Eldorado Nuclear Limited — Regional 
Industrial Expansion 

Self-Supporting Airports and Associated 
Ground Services revolving fund — Trans- 
port 

Gulf Oil Canada Ltd— Public Works 

Interest on loans to employees posted 
abroad — National Defence 

Interest on short-term investment certifi- 
cates — Labour 

Public buildings and properties — National 
Revenue — 
Rental 



428.960.788 8,161,899,600 
242,705,639 5.857.609.626 



738,477,498 4,815,000,000 
260,475,058 



69,264,623 
21,812,458 

13,049,505 267,545,331 
5,172,809 

960,378 

879,593 

643,456 

537,485 
325,321 

269,765 

130,188 

114.840 



Electrical Reduction Co Ltd — Public 
Works 

Advancement of industrial technology — 
Regional Industrial Expansion 

Tourist Industry Development Sub- Agree- 
ments — Regional Industrial Expansion .... 

interest on sale of irrigated land — Agricul- 
ture — 
Other 

Department owned housing — Employment 
and Immigration — 
Rental 

Interest on direct loans previously deleted — 
Indian Affairs and Northern Develop- 
ment 

Loans and advances to persons posted 
abroad — RCMP — Solicitor General — 

Interest $ 9.828 

Transfer of profit 547 

Town of Mount Pearl — Public Works 

Transportation assistance to settlers — 

Employment and Immigration 

Sundries — Public Works 

Sundries — Veterans Affairs — 

Other 

Sundries — Energy. Mines and Resources .... 



Amount 
realized in 
l984-85<'> 


Amount 

invested at 

March 31, 

1985<2) 


S 


S 


109,854 




57,370 




46,049 




24.578 




15,060 




14.438 





10.375 
3.997 

39 
260,249 

17,363 
958 



Total other accounts 852.198.249 5,343,020,389 



TOTAL RETURN ON INVESTMENTS 5,201.709,820 55,178,537,351 



Summary — 

Interest 2,779,623,597 

Transfer of profit 2,356,135,234 

Dividends 43,966,690 

Rental income from properties 21,942,358 

Other 41,941 

Total 5,201,709,820 



*'> The amounts reported in this column represent interest unless otherwise indicated. 

<^' The amounts reported in this column represent the closing balances of asset accounts as at March 31. 1985. They generally do not represent amounu of principal on 
which interest is calculated and/or dividends paid. 



14*10 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Report of surplus material disposed of in 1984-85 



Obsolete but 
serviceable 



Surplus but 
serviceable 



Department and agency 



Cost 



Value 
obtained 



Cost 



Value 
obtained 



Surplus but 
repairable 

Value 
obtained 



Scrap 



Value 
obtained 



Agriculture 

Communications — 

Department 

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications 
Commission 2,270 

National Film Board 399 

National Library 

National Museums of Canada 10,425 

Public Archives 550 

Consumer and Corporate Affairs 18,627 

Employment and Immigration — 

Department 178,697 

Immigration Appeal Board 

Energy, Mines and Resources — 

Department 257,598 

Atomic Energy Control Board 

National Energy Board 

Environment 325,129 

External Affairs — 

Department 

Canadian Commercial Corporation 722 

Canadian International Development Agency 

International Joint Commission 

Finance — 

Department 

Auditor General 

Insurance 

Tariff Board 

Fisheries and Oceans 297,767 

Governor General 

Indian Affairs and Northern Development 8,818 

Justice — 

Department 

Canadian Human Rights Commission 

Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs 

Supreme Court of Canada 

Tax Court of Canada 

Labour — 

Department 1,335 

Canada Labour Relations Board 

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

National Defence 26,016,140 

National Health and Welfare — 

Department 248,895 

Medical Research Council 

National Revenue — 

Customs and Excise 792 

Taxation 

Parliament — 

The Senate 

House of Commons 

Library of Parliament 

Privy Council — 

Department 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Commissioner of Official Languages 

Economic Council of Canada 9,293 

Public Service Staff Relations Board 1,263 

Public Works 103,646 

Regional Industrial Expansion 36,436 

Science and Technology — 

Ministry of State 

National Research Council of Canada 

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council .. 

Science Council of Canada 

Secretary of State — 

Department 

Public Service Commission 

Status of Women — Office of the Co-ordinator 

Social Development 

Solicitor General — 

Department 

Correctional Service 578,420 

National Parole Board 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 16,632 



S 

14,893 

3,248 

701 
70 

63 

50 

6,023 

7,220 



5,385 



11,530 

350 
50 



15,858 

1.332 

72 

310 

211 

719 
709,009 

9,317 



50 
800 



315 



410 
511 



1.036 
7,600 
1,479 



47,772 



147,225 



36,881 

1,268 

11,993 



5,450 

5,139 

400 

4,920 

24,550 

113,900 

651.377 



543.814 

1.000 

25.677 

413.219 



250,000 

600 
10,166 

412,975 

54,977 

11,000 

42,711 
9,765 

8,827,801 

353,642 

49,312 



$ 

28,894 

11,600 

833 

650 

150 

25 

4,743 

22,992 

45,335 
370 

14,814 

706 

1,697 

85,919 

21,500 

1,078 



200 

327 

5,553 

203,489 

7,421 

34,728 

1,302 

2.703 

13.172 

238 

7.172 

335.138 

27.829 



2,409 
17,113 



10,340 





1,843 




3.532 


9,815 


4.800 


7,475 


3.237 


1,550 


308 


2,002,645 


182.125 


79,689 


255.313 


48,670 


16,181 




5,100,261 


11,988 




100 


4 



886,343 
131,186 



201 

1.473 
571 

127 

184,704 

4 

67.718 



$ 

616,163 

81,989 

2,573 

663 

25 

38,059 

26,658 

215,860 

151,419 
1.315 

68,406 

4,592 

4,408 

817,941 

742,777 

9,107 



20,987 

173 

1,046 

870,590<'> 

406 
166,776 

5,141 
268 



1,337 

6,647 

2,650 

11,252 

4,300,424 

234,549 
160 

91,991 
83.779 

18.461 

79.744 

644 

14,668 
5,303 

3,170 

1,856 

341,914 

58.861 

1,258 
51,657 



4,891 

17,152 

254 

4,092 

1,423 

237,351 

15 

4,055,662 



S 

22,429 

4,338 



1,368 

314.401 

33.006 

17.011 
35 

53.119 
120 
218 

50.861 

231 



50 



160 
6 



24.051 

13.846 

7.140 
112 

45 
1.489 

25 

725 

5,849 
2,142,211 

17,193 



26,073 
15,675 

50 
20,917 

275 

2.692 
417 
640 

1,223 

416,406 

3.121 

55 

12,024 



2.387 

11.774 
35 



10 

83.153 

308 

86.046 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Report of surplus material disposed of in 1984-85 — Concluded 



14* 11 



Obsolete but 
serviceable 



Department and agency 



Cost 



Value 
obtained 



Surplus but 
serviceable 



Cost 



Value 
obtained 



Surplus but 
repairable 

Value 
obtained 



Scrap 



Value 
obtained 



Supply and Services — 

Department — 

Services Program 41,258 

Supply Program 146,266 

Crown Assets Disposal Corporation 

Statistics Canada 

Transport — 

Department 2,606,588 

Canadian Transport Commission 

Northern Pipeline Agency 

Veterans Affairs 93,656 

Total 31,001,622 

(" Includes sale of surplus fish. 



1,071 
9,938 

9,258 


133,849 
48,725 
21,560 


14,632 

13,619 

1,453 

144 


28,487 

92,469 

4.900 

14.517 


16.011 

221.883 

75 


51,657 
810 

1,690 


2.519,671 

24,880 
45,951 


106,231 

17,500 
22,528 


1,610.945 
48.417 


137.672 
80 

93.547 


18,175 


17,786,492 


6,908,949 


15.278.242 


3.862.588 



14'12 

Public debt charges 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Rate of 
interest 



Amount of 
principal^'' 



Amount expended 
in 1984-85(2) 



UNMATURED DEBT— 
Marketable bonds — 

Payable in Canadian currency — 

P 1—1936-96 3 

T 15—1956-96/98 (conversion loan) 3V* 

AT 21 — 1963-88 5 

CT 9— 1964-88 5 

CT 12—1964/65-90 5Vi 

F 6— 1966/67-92 5% 

F 12— 1967-90 5V* 

F 23— 1967-94 6V* 

F 33— 1968-95 6Vi 

F 39—1974-84 (matured April 1, 1984) 7Vi 

F 47— 1969/70/77-86 8 

F 57—1975/78-85 8 

F 61— 1971-89 6% 

F 79— 1980-87 8 

F 81 — 1979-84 (matured April 1, 1984) 8 

F 85—1974/75/76/77-94 9V4 

F 87—1974-84 (matured April 1, 1984) 914 

F 91— 1979-84 (matured Oct 1, 1984) 8y4 

F 96— 1980-85 9V4 

F 97—1975/76-95 10 

J 2— 1976/78-2001 9V4 

J 7— 1977-2002 8% 

J 9— 1977/78-97 9V* 

J 1 1 — 1977-87 SV* 

J 13—1977-99 9 

J 15—1978-88 8% 

J 18—1978-2003 914 

J 22— 1978-2000 9% 

J 23—1979/80-84 (matured June 1, 1984) 10 

J 24— 1979-2004 10V4 

J 25— 1979-2002 10 

J 26— 1979-89 10 

J 28—1979-84 (matured Oct 1, 1984) lOVi 

J 29— 1979/80/83-89 1016 

J 30— 1979-2004 10i6 

J 32—1979/80-84 (matured Dec 15, 1984) llVi 

J 33— 1979/80/83/84-89 11^4 

J 34— 1979/80/83-2002 Iiy4 

J 35—1980/83-2003 11% 

J 37—1980-85 (matured Mar 15, 1985) 13% 

J 38— 1980-90 13% 

J 39— 1980/81/82-2000 13% 

(3) J 40—1980-85 13 

J 41— 1980-90 13 

J 42— 1980/81-2001 13 

J 44— 1980-85 11 W 

J 46— 1980/82-85 10% 

J 48—1980-84 (matured Oct 1, 1984) 1214 

J 49— 1980-90 1214 

J 53— 1980-99 1314 

WJ 55— 1981-86 1214 

J 56— 1981-91 1214 

J 57—1981-84 (matured Aug 1, 1984) 13% 

J 58— 1981-89 13% 

J 59—1981-85 (matured Feb 1, 1985) 1314 

\ J 60— 1981-90 1314 

(3)J 61— 1981-86 1414 

J 62— 1981-91 1414 

J 63—1981-84 (matured April 1, 1984) 1614 

(3)j 64— 1981-86 1514 

J 65— 1981-93 1514 

J 66— 1981-2001 15% 

(3)J 68— 1981-86 14% 

J 69— 1981-93 14% 

J 70— 1981-2000 15 

Wj 72— 1981-86 18 

J 73— 1981-91 18 

J 74—1982-84 (matured Aug 1, 1984) 16 

<3)J 75— 1982-87 1514 

J 76— 1982-92 1514 

J 77—1982-84 (matured Aug 1, 1984) 15 

J 78— 1982-87 15 

J 79— 1982-2002 1514 

J 80—1982-84 (matured Dec 15, 1984) 14% 

J 81— 1982-87 14% 

J 82— 1982-92 15 



55,000,000 
197,045,000 
100,000,000 

50,000,000 
225,000,000 
225,000,000 
125,000,000 
125,000 
100,000,000 

410,380,000 

116,479,000 

150,000,000 

7,000 

764,120,000 



1,345,000 
709,750,000 

1,411,500,000 
252,000,000 

1,032,000,000 
525,000,000 
621,750,000 
125,000,000 
787,500,000 
550,000,000 

2,200,000,000 

1,850,000,000 

200,000,000 

775,000,000 
600,000,000 

1,075,000,000 
1,625,000,000 
2,700,000,000 

839,453,000 
1,050,000,000 

1 5,653,000 \ 
1,784,347,000/ 
1,325,000,000 
450,000,000 
850,000,000 

22,529,000 
400,000,000 
724,583,000\ 
417,000/ 

442,320,000 

592,912,000 
498,945,000\ 
1,055,000/ 

816,308,000\ 

83,692,000/ 

425,000,000 

438,765,000 \ 

11,235,000/ 

175,000,000 

300,1 99,000 \ 

99,801,000/ 

1,1 44,1 96,000 \ 
105,804,000/ 

800,000,000 
350,000,000 

250,000,000 
200,000,000 



1,650,198 

7,390,070 

4,988,584 

2,494,292 

11,782,878 

12,940,406 

7,546,043 

7,795 

6,482,192 

10,740 

32,740,454 

9,298,022 

10,100,672 

559 

13 

75,874,299 

61,149 

32,903 

127,425 

73,020,951 

136,437,768 

22,769,973 

97,660,063 

43,223,015 

57.044,211 

9,912,365 

76,109,922 

55,017,218 

18,186,241 

224,981,784 

184,536,080 

19,945,206 

15,814,608 

81,152,055 

62,827,397 

56,956,206 

122,615,305 

182,378,507 

316,520,935 

52,825,272 

64,000,154 

144,392,291 

137,743,962 

95,669,242 

171,853,825 

50,520,408 

91,124,657 

47,500,195 

2,642,309 

53,876,712 

90,398,829 

17,908 

528,688 

60,508,316 

27,368,164 

51,461,247 

72,214,542 

104,076 

191,645 

124,257,840 

12,678,803 

66,783,673 

64,640,729 

1,949,506 

26,124,046 

55,409,375 

16,393,365 

17,713,115 

180,021,969 

14,039,440 

16,516,393 

120,014,372 

54,256,497 

10,436,075 

36,790,810 

29,931,507 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 
Public debt charges — Continued 



14*13 



Rate of 
interest 



Amount of 
principal'" 



Amount expended 
in 1984-85"> 



J83— 1982-85 

<'>J 84— 1982-87 

J85— 1982-92 

J86— 1982-85 

(3)j 87— 1982-87 

J 88— 1982-92 

J 89— 1982-85 

J 90— 1982-87 

J 91— 1982-92 

J 92— 1982/84-87 

J 93— 1982-92 

J 95— 1982/83-92 

J 96— 1982/83/84-87 

J 97— 1983-85 

J 98— 1983-88 

J 99— 1983-93 

H 1—1983-86 

H 2— 1983/85-88 

H3— 1983-93 

H 4— 1983-85 

H 5—1983/85-90 

H 6— 1983-2005 

H7— 1983-85 

H 8— 1983/84-93 

H 9— 1983/84-2005 

H 11—1983-88 

H 12—1983/84-93 

H 13—1983-85 

H 14—1983/84-86 

H 15—1984-89 

H 16—1984-86 

H 17—1984-94 

H 18—1984/85-2006 

H 20—1984-89 

H 21— 1984-94 

H 22—1984-2004 

H 23—1984-87 

H 24—1984-89 

H 25—1984-94 

H 26—1984-2006 

H 27— 1984-87 

H 28—1984-86 

H 29—1984-94 

H 30—1984-2007 

H 31— 1984-87 

H 32—1984-89 

H 36—1984-2007 

H 37—1984-86 

H 39—1984-94 

H 40— 1984-89 

H 41— 1984-2008 

H 42— 1984-94 

H 43— 1984/85-90 

H 44— 1984/85-95 

H 45— 1984/85-88 

H 46— 1984-86 

H 47— 1984-91 

H 48— 1984-95 

H 49— 1985-89 

H 51— 1985-95 

H 52—1985-2008 

H 54—1985-95 

H 55— 1985-87 

Discounts or premiums 

Commissions 

Payable in foreign currencies- 
United States dollars**)- 

1962-87 

1968-88 

1978-85 

1978-98 

1978-98 

1981-86 



% 

ISK 

IS 

13 

14Vi 

14(4 

MM 

12% 

13 

13^ 

12 

12% 

11% 

11 

9V4 
10% 
liy4 
10 
10^ 
10% 

9% 
10% 

12^4 

\QVi 
11% 
12 
10% 
11^ 
9% 
10 
11 

\OVi 
12 

n^h 

\VA 
13 

\VA 

13'/4 

13% 

14 

13 

13 

13V4 

13% 

13 

12(4 

12% 

12% 

12% 

\Vh 

12 

12(4 

11% 

10% 

WVi 

11% 

10% 

im 
11% 
\\v* 

12 



5 

6^/i 
8.2 
8% 
9% 
16% 



350,000.000 
399,964.000 \ 
36.000/ 
200,000.000 
649,950.000 \ 
50.000/ 
1 50,000.000 
450,000,000 
400,000.000 
475,000.000 
500.000,000 

2,050,000,000 
900,000.000 
275,000.000 
500,000.000 

1.850.000.000 
625.000.000 
875.000.000 

1.050,000,000 
300,000.000 
550,000.000 

1,000,000,000 
300,000.000 

1,025,000,000 

1,775,000,000 
625,000,000 
850,000,000 
350,000,000 
200,000,000 
200.000,000 
350,000.000 
225.000.000 
975.000,000 
575,000,000 

1.025.000,000 
550,000,000 
650,000,000 
525,000,000 

1.200,000,000 

1,025,000,000 
375,000,000 
375,000,000 
250,000,000 
325,000,000 
150.000.000 
150.000,000 
700.000,000 
400,000,000 
475,000.000 
325,000.000 
750,000,000 
900,000,000 
400,000,000 
725,000,000 
250.000,000 
450.000,000 
225.000,000 
475,000,000 
350,000,000 
375,000,000 
325,000,000 
375,000,000 
400.000.000 



69,256.215.000 



65.452,800 
136.360,000 
340,900,000 
340,900,000 
477,260,000 
409,080.000 
1.769.952.800 



54.137.918 
59.870.419 
4.621 
29.006.512 
92.640,461 
5.573 
19.072.603 
58.345.857 
53.857.714 
46.225,968 
63,596,817 

240,350,300 
89.055,803 
26,754.094 
51.132.224 

207.646,713 
62,507.486 
69.135.257 

112,618.014 
27.687.682 
17.312.859 

122.527.510 
31.988.631 

120.160.494 

181.291.152 
67.073.057 

103.416.542 
34.048,367 
19.967.741 
21.916.020 
36.756.877 
27.114.595 
47.213.108 
59.662,448 

105,214,628 
70,599,171 
56,129.479 
54,677.492 

122.252.767 

106.037.901 

37.969.450 

39.725.466 

26.214.035 

35.076.627 

13.509.220 

13.426.036 

52.605.637 

27.990.411 

33,143.670 

18.566.861 

44.808.390 

53,017.291 

3,961.642 

16,117.974 

4,144,696 

15,364,558 

7.511.285 

16.208.562 

8,555.822 

6,852.740 

18,910.802 

4.623.288 

657.534 

105.551.554 

66.748,981 

7,543.813.868 



3,259,163 
9.173,771 
27.621,805 
29.053.423 
43.624.424 
65.297.304 
178,029.890 



14-14 

Public debt charges — Continued 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Deutsche marks*'* — 

1978-84 (matured May 10, 1984) 
1982-89 

Swiss francs**' — 

1979-89 

1984-92 



Rate of 
interest 


Amount of 
principal*" 


Amount expended 
in 1984-85(2) 


% 


$ 


$ 


5 
8>^ 


89,200,000 
89.200.000 


658,033 
7.433,007 
8.091.040 


3H 

5'/4 


152,064,000 

105,600,000 

257.664.000 

2,116,816,800 


5,167,283 

5,005,000 

10.172.283 

196,293,213 



71,373,031,800 



7,740,107,081 



Canada savings bonds — 

S 27—1972-84 (matured Nov 1, 1984) 

c 28 1973-85 

S 30—1975-84 (matured Nov 1, 1984) .''..ZZZ'Z^'^ZZ''Z''.^.''. 

S 31— 1976-85 

S 32— 1977-86 

S 33— 1978-85 

S 34— 1979-86 

S 35— 1980-87 

S 36— 1981-88 

S 37— 1982-89 

S 38— 1983-90 

S 39— 1984-91 

Interest expense adjustment for series which have matured in previous years. 
Commissions 

Special non-marketable bonds — 

Canada Pension Plan Investment Fund 

Treasury bills — 

Unamortized balance carried forward at March 31, 1984 

Amortization of discount on 1984-85 issues 



Borrowings of Canadair Financial Corporation Inc. to be repaid by the Govern- 
ment — 

Payable in Canadian currency 

Payable in foreign currencies 



Notes and loans payable in foreign currencies — 

United States dollars*^)— 

Canadian banks 

American banks 

1982-87 

1983-88 

1985-90 

Swiss francs**' — 

1979-85 (matured March 14, 1985) 

1982-87 

1984-87 

1984-89 

1984-90 

Japanese yen**' — 

1979-89 

1979-99 

1984-92 

Servicing costs and costs of issuing new loans 

Total public debt charges related to unmatured debt.. 



10'/6 




76,976,398 


10Vi-ll'/4 


263,240,350 


64,467.773 


10'/4 




71,482.591 


WVi-lVA 


472,325,300 


68,102,714 


10'A-ll'/4 


400,057,700 


78,531,294 


lO'/i-ll'/* 


2.885,177.700 


457.472,499 


10W-ll'/4 


2.020.676,500 


288,594,371 


lO'/i-llW 


1,361,726,200 


194,061.954 


lO'/i-llVi 


7,756.059,100 


1.031.581.248 


9'/4-10'/4-ll'/4 


6,943,298,400 


824,432.937 


9'/4-10'/4-ll'/4 


7,678,844,200 


955,188.276 


11^4 


12,178,025,006 


587,369,483 

6,694,146 

112,861,438 



41,959,430,456 


4,817.817.122 


205,337,000*" 


21.662.009 


52,300,000,000 


1,016,378,026 
4,199.174,225 


52,300,000,000 


5,215,552,251 



100,000,000 
1,016.976.000 



1.116.976.000 



various 


545.440.000 


43,632,196 


various 


1.363.600.000 


42,111,418 


14% 


1.022.700.000 


148,862,946 


10% 


681.800.000 


74,013,241 


IVA 


681.800.000 


1,960,175 




4.295.340.000 


310.579.976 


3 




6,909,812 


7'/4 


211.200.000 


13,790.372 


4% 


158.400.000 


6,899,588 


5% 


158.400.000 


8,217.000 


5'/8 


105.600.000 


4.810,666 




633,600,000 


40.627.438 


7.1 


169.611.750 


13,041,290 


TA 


190,575,000 


13.579,712 


7.9 


653,400,000 


33,577.495 




1.013.586.750 


60.198.497 



5,942,526,750 


411,405,911 


54,244,474 


172,897,302,006 


18,260,788,848 



OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

Public debt charges — Concluded 



14*15 



SPECIFIED PURPOSE ACCOUNTS— 

Canada Pension Plan Account 

Annuities agents' pension account 

Government Annuities Account 

Canadian Forces Superannuation Account 

Regular forces death benefit account 

Members of Parliament retiring allowances account 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — 

Dependants' pension fund 

Superannuation Account 

Public Service death benefit account 

Public Service Superannuation Account 

Supplementary Retirement Benefits Account 

Canadian Forces 

Diplomatic Services 

Judges 

Lieutenant-Governors 

Judges superannuation account 

Deposit and trust accounts — 

Common school funds — 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Foreign claims fund 

War claims fund — World War II 

Guarantee deposits — Reserve resources 

Land assurance fund 

Federal Court special account 

Contractors' security deposits 

Army benevolent fund 

Halifax 1917 explosion pension account 

Indian band funds 

Indian compensation funds 

Indian moneys suspense account 

Cost recoverable technical assistance program 

Indian estate accounts 

Indian savings accounts 

Medical Research Council — Donations and bequests 

Maritime pollution claims fund 

Western grain stabilization account 

Mackenzie King trust account 

Indian special accounts 

Queen's Fellowship fund 

Inmates' trust fund 

Veterans administration and welfare trust fund 

Allocation of Special Drawing Rights of the International Monetary Fund 

St Lawrence Seaway Authority 

National Museums of Canada — Trust account 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police — Benefit fund 

Total public debt charges related to specified purpose accounts 

TOTAL PUBLIC DEBT CHARGES 

Summary: 

Interest 

Discount on Treasury bills 

Discounts or premiums 

Commissions ,.••• 

Servicing costs and costs of issuing new loans 



Rate of 


Amount of 


Amount expended 


interest 


principal"* 


in 1984-85<2> 


% 


S 


S 


various 


1,707,355,679 


151.501.921 


4 


47.801 


1.371 


7 


1,095,429.638 


74,928,146 


various 


13,134,506,039 


1,327,564,527 


various 


58,736,076 


5,814,566 


6 


22,350,690 


2,312,087 


4 


13,764,359 


1,381.598 


various 


1,815,802,101 


175,873,712 


various 


261,173,828 


24.142,424 


various 


19,622,485,102 


1,970.726,332 


various 


2,417,425,257 


206.505,907 


various 




39,344,977 


various 




1,816 


various 




438,723 


various 




6,688 


various 




6,584 


5 


1,502,256<" 


76,662 


5 


l,175,5I5<»> 


57,226 


various 


1,737,648 


165,203 


various 


9,940,705 


911.325 


various 


455,428 


45.525 


3 


733,186 


19.869 


various 


8,799,789 


555.689 


various 


19,719,319 


15.248.603 


various 


1,131,809 


126.077 


various 


936,174 


95,016 


various 


781,524,250 


84,702,077 


various 


112,600 


12.771 


various 


22,507,376 


1.323.803 


various 


677,494 


144.507 


various 


13,878,795 


258.588 


various 


76,879,131 


7,510,043 


various 


79,079 


8,176 


various 


103,281,206 


11,750,599 


various 


970,514,445 


92,857,946 


9.28 


278.881 


28.687 


various 


588.561 


397,064 


various 


311,814 


6,844 


various 


5,348,840 


393,634 


various 


418,604 


219,002 


various 




91,633,063 


various 


13,000,000 


1,070,072 




414,806 


44,295 


various 


1,798.024 


170,052 




2.037.745.735 


309.832.418 




42,186,822,305 


4,290,383,797 




215,084,124,311 


22,551,172,645 






16,996,213,947 






5,215.552,251 






105.551.554 






179.610.419 






54.244.474 






22,551,172,645 



<•> For unmatured debt, the amount of principal represents the closing balance as at March 31, 1985. For the specified purpose accounts, the amount of principal 

represents the net closing balance as at March 31, 1985. 
<^' Amounts reported in this column represent interest (i.e. interest on unmatured debt (including Treasury bill discounts) and on specified purpose accounts) unless 

otherwise indicated. 
<'> Exchangeable at the option of the holder for an equal par value bond bearing the same interest rate. 
<"' Converted to $ 1 US = $ 1 .3636 Canadian. 
<5> Converted to 1 DM = $.4460 Canadian. 
<*' Converted to 1 SF = $.5280 Canadian. 
<^> Term to maturity is 20 years, or such lesser period as may from time to time be fixed by the Minister of Finance on recommendations of the Chief Actuary of the 

Department of Insurance, redeemable in whole or in part before maturity only at the option of the Minister of Finance. 
(*' Converted to 1 Y = $.005445 Canadian. 
('' Interest on this balance is distributed to the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec on a basis of population. 



14-16 

Capital leases 



PUBLIC ACCOUNTS, 1984-85 



Commitments under capital lease arrangements 

This statement provides details of commitments under capital lease arrangements which are summarized in Note 1 5 to the 
audited financial statements in Section 2 of this volume. A capital lease is a lease that, from the point of view of the Government, 
transfers substantially all the benefits and risks incident to ownership of the asset to the Government, 
(in thousands of dollars) 



Department and agency Lease 

identification Inception term in 

of capital lease date years 

Employment and Immigration 

Electronic data processing. Phase IV .... Oct 12, 1982 5 

Environment 

Cray computer Jan 11,1983 6.5 

Public Works 

Charlottetown, DVA Building Apr 1, 1984 35 

Guy Fav